Should we always start with the smallest rod? - Page 2
RSS | Subscribe | Contact Us | Advertise | About Us
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 31 of 31
  1. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    122

    Re: Should we always start with the smallest rod?

    Well I got that book and took a first look at it this morning. You're joking aren't you?

    Lincoln Electric is joking. 'Procedure Handbook' ? A handbook fits in the pocket and contains handy tables and such. Here's a good one for you: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...tRdsLRctw9FFvx

    This thing is an encyclopedia, and engineering manual, a history book, a discussion on aesthetics....

    Directing people to this as an answer to a little question is like directing someone who asks what is Pythagoras' theorem to Russell's Principia Mathematica.

    The word overkill doesn't adequately convey...

    But, having said all that I've got to admit it's a great book and I'm glad to have it. An excellent addition to a library. You start reading a little bit and get sucked in further and further. I like it. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

    Until now my 'major' work on welding has been 'Modern Welding' by Althouse, Turnquist, Bowditch - recommended to me as the 'Bible' some years ago by welding aficionados. Now it has a companion. A big brother I think it might be.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    2,291

    Re: Should we always start with the smallest rod?

    You had it correct in the beginning when you said 'more heat = more penetration'. Big rods get down into the bottom of the joint just fine.

    Also, how would the know you had excess penetration in the root if there wasn't a side view? Most of the fillet stuff we do is welded all the way around, you can't see any root penetration from the side.

    There is definitely a tendency to overthink things in this forum.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,166

    Re: Should we always start with the smallest rod?


    abrogard


    Quote Originally Posted by abrogard View Post

    . . . Directing people to this as an answer to a little question is like directing someone
    who asks what is Pythagoras' theorem to Russell's Principia Mathematica. . .

    Name:  GEO - 1.png
Views: 78
Size:  44.5 KB


    Pythagorean math is undisputed - [Pythagoras influenced Plato] - Platonic Ideals are not
    pure mathematics . . . hence the disasters of the 20th Century - and the self-generating
    extinctions in the 21st Century . . .

    Russell
    had help . . . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Gödel . . . via Newton . . .
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standi...ders_of_giants

    For the nonspecialist - this a good first read . . .
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gödel,_Escher,_Bach


    Opus



    ps - are you Down-Under . . . ?

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    270

    Re: Should we always start with the smallest rod?

    Quote Originally Posted by TimmyTIG View Post
    You had it correct in the beginning when you said 'more heat = more penetration'. Big rods get down into the bottom of the joint just fine.
    some one did a cut and etch test video on small rods vers large rods. the large rod had less penetration and think even a bit of lof.
    "more heat = more penetration" is quite right, however if you can do the same heat with a smaller rod you will get better penetration. the other way to look at it is a bigger rod at the same amps will give less penetration.
    the other part of this, and i think this was the point of the video, is the size of the flux. its the overall diameter of the rod that matters. some of the really thick coated rods can give less penetration.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Western New York State, USA
    Posts
    1,749

    Re: Should we always start with the smallest rod?

    Quote Originally Posted by abrogard View Post
    This wouldn't be right else I'd have heard of it before now, but I just thought of it and thought maybe it was worth bringing up.

    In the interests of penetration wouldn't we be better always starting with the smallest rod?

    Because the typical joint is a right angle, true? So to get right into that angle you need a small diameter rod. True?

    Get a great big thick rod and it won't get in the same as a thin one.

    Obviously it just doesn't matter in practice but I wonder if it holds true in theory - would a small rod get in there better than a thick one, at least to some extent?
    .
    .
    rule of thumb use a rod 40% to 100% thickness being welded flat welding on a bench
    3/32 rod for 1/8 thick
    1/8 rod for 1/4 thick
    3/16 rod for 3/8 thick, sometimes 5/32 easier
    3/16 rod for 1/2 thick
    .
    if you weld vertical up or overhead its easier to use 3/32 and 1/8 rod, rare to use 5/32 rod and even rarer to be over 150 amps. vertical down welding you can go faster and use more amps but normally under 200 amps

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    6,878

    Re: Should we always start with the smallest rod?

    "Consider acquiring: Lincoln's - The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding."

    I got a mid-1950's edition for 50 cents. Great read. Though they didn't weld the book cover on very well.

    Mine has some funny parts. Like when they go on and on about how welding is replacing rivets and many modern bridges are welded together.
    Last edited by Oldendum; 08-11-2018 at 06:04 PM.
    "USMCPOP" First-born son: KIA Iraq 1/26/05
    Syncrowave 250 w/ Coolmate 3
    Dialarc 250, Idealarc 250
    SP-175 +
    Firepower TIG 160S (gave the TA 161 STL to the son)
    Lincwelder AC180C (1952)
    Victor & Smith O/A torches
    Miller spot welder

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
RSS | Home | Penton Media | Contact Us | Subscribe | For Advertisers | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement