F.n.g.
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Thread: F.n.g.

  1. #1

    F.n.g.

    Hello everyone. I'm in my late 30's, located in Central Oklahoma, and I recently started a blacksmithing project as another hobby and skill. Part of this is going to require some welding, so it's a great reason to finally learn a bit about welding and start burning some rods.

    My father has been employed as an engineer, fabricator and pipe welder for over 40 years, so I asked him to learn me the basics of welding about a month ago. I haven't even held an electrode holder since I was in my early teen years. I fell in love with the arc immediately and felt the same when I started seeing a the challenges that come with learning to weld and welding in general. I don't plan on attempting to be a professional welder but I enjoy learning new skills and always pushing myself to increase my skills, so I'm going to start off stick welding. Obviously being new to welding, I've had a ton of questions and I have been very impressed with the users and the collective knowledge on this forum. I probably can't contribute much to the community but I enjoy learning and maybe I can prove you can teach old dogs new tricks every now and then.


    To start off, I picked up what I believe to be a 2005 made Lincoln AC/DC 225/125. Model 10426. Most of the AC/DC version welders go for about $450.00 used in my area or at least that's what I could find on Craigslist and these were at least 200 miles away. I was however able to find one in Hobbs, NM. It was listed at $250 but the seller understood my drive was going to be a challenge for me (500 miles) so he gave it to me for $200 and included a rolling base, 35' work and electrode leads, along with an extra ground clamp and electrode holder. I still need to get a helmet, gloves and probably a set of arm sleeves. LoL. I'm still sporting spatter burns on my forearms when initially welding with my father.

    I picked up the welder last week. It has definitely seen more use than love so the first order of business was to take the entire welder about and clean it. It's still apart on the bench as I ordered a new switch for it since 1-pole wasn't working. The seller said he had a problem with it a bit. The leads had seen better days so I cut the problem areas out and ended up with a clean set of 20 foot leads. I've added "Welding City" Dinse quick disconnect connectors to both leads and installed face panel sockets to it, linked below. I've installed a new 50 AMP circuit to my panel in the garage with a 6-50R receptacle. It came with a 12-2 AWG power cable installed with a molded 6-50p plug. Seems a little light to me but it's only 6' long. I'll use it a bit and see if it gets hot and go from there. Maybe I'll replace it with a new 8 AWG cable and new 6-50p plug in the future. Still waiting on the replacement switch at this point but I'm forcing myself to not get too excited about it as too make sure I'm not over-looking anything.


    Anyhow, that's my story and what I'm working on and a little about why I'm here.

    Here's a picture of my new little buzzbox before I tore into it.

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    https://imgur.com/KOj1Vsl

    and while it's torn down.............waiting on parts. I was able to take the polarity and heat select switches apart then cleaned, polished, and greased them with a little synthetic grease.

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    https://imgur.com/H368rsu


    Below are the links to the 35-50 SQ-MM DINSE Connectors and Sockets I picked up for the buzzbox.


    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00GK60WZQ

    and

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LZ8QVYL/
    Last edited by R2kone; 11-10-2018 at 03:09 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    2,962

    Re: F.n.g.

    honestly for all that mileage and time spent and it needs repairs you could of bought a brand new one for around $675.00.. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lincoln-...1297/100053881... or cheaper at a lws...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    AJO, ARIZONA
    Posts
    1,108

    Re: F.n.g.

    Welcome! Best of luck with the welder and your new venture. Many years ago my grandfather was a blacksmith, machinist, gunsmith, trapper and varmint hunter in Missouri around the Bolivar/Stockton area if you are familiar with the area.
    NRA LIFE MEMBER
    UNITWELD 175 AMP 3 IN1 DC MIG/STICK/TIG
    MIDSTATES 300 AMP AC MACHINE
    GOD BLESS AMERICA!
    “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.
    We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream".
    RONALD REAGAN

  4. #4

    Re: F.n.g.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbytime View Post
    honestly for all that mileage and time spent and it needs repairs you could of bought a brand new one for around $675.00.. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lincoln-...1297/100053881... or cheaper at a lws...

    You're absolutely correct. I most definitely could have bought a new one for only a few hundred more than I spent on this one after miles, fuel, switch and so on. I have a bit of a soft spot for buying something used and putting it back in service. Plus this allows me to learn more about how it works along with the short coming of the machine. That's just me though. Always trying to learn.
    Last edited by R2kone; 11-11-2018 at 12:04 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Land of the Toxic Avenger
    Posts
    881

    Re: F.n.g.

    I like the idea you saving old machinery, if the repair costs don't surpass the value of the unit. Seems as though everything is disposed of, now a days.

    Like your train of thought. Welcome..


    Btw.., what does F.n.g. mean? First National Guard?
    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  6. #6

    Re: F.n.g.

    Quote Originally Posted by T man View Post
    Btw.., what does F.n.g. mean? First National Guard?
    Thanks T man. My father instilled in me that we don't throw something away when it breaks or is in need of repair. That just translated to me buying something older or in need of some love. Also, like I said earlier, It's another way to learn about something I don't encounter or user everyday.


    F.N.G "F#%king new guy" I'm not sure of the age or popularity of the abbreviation but it's always been associated to inexperienced newbies into any given hobby, profession, or line work.

    Have a good one.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    2,962

    Re: F.n.g.

    Quote Originally Posted by R2kone View Post
    You're absolutely correct. I most definitely could have bought a new one for only a few hundred more than I spent on this one after miles, fuel, switch and so on. I have a bit of a soft spot for buying something used and putting it back in service. Plus this allows me to learn more about how it works along with the short coming of the machine. That's just me though. Always trying to learn.
    try to find an older lincoln round top to restore..they are nice welders.....I hear you on the fix up the old, I enjoy doing that also...

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