Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth
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  1. #1
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    Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Hi All,
    Since I have just gotten into abrasive blasting the subject of dust management has been an important consideration for my HF Bench Top Blast Cabinet mod.
    https://weldingweb.com/showthread.ph...-and-questions
    I also found tons of contradicting info floating around on the web specifically related to glass dust.
    In a nutshell glass dust is "Amorphous Silica Dioxide" which is safe, while sand (or rock) dust is "Chrystaline Silica Dioxide" and dangerous. OSHA defines glass dust as a "nuisance dust" and generally benign. Of course no dust of whatever sort is good to breathe but based on what I researched I am not going to worry about exposure especially since my dust collection system woks so well.

    Here is where I got my information from:
    http://terrazzco.com/osha-silica-rule-glass-dust/
    https://www.fireapparatusmagazine.co...n-a-cloud.html

  2. #2
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Keep believing that.
    BTW, kindly post a selfie with the blood dripping from your nose when you've breathed enough of that crap.

    PS, if you're near one of the bottle recycling plants you can probably get all of it you want free, just for sweeping it up and carrying it off.

  3. #3
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by Virgil5 View Post
    Keep believing that.
    BTW, kindly post a selfie with the blood dripping from your nose when you've breathed enough of that crap.

    PS, if you're near one of the bottle recycling plants you can probably get all of it you want free, just for sweeping it up and carrying it off.
    Last time I looked, glass was made from Silica sand? Would not crushed glass dust be silica sand?

  4. #4
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by 12V71 View Post
    Last time I looked, glass was made from Silica sand? Would not crushed glass dust be silica sand?
    Once the sand is melted & combined with lime and other ingredients the silica hazard found in sand pretty much disappears. Refining silica back out of glass is about as possible as breaking down Freon 12 in the upper atmosphere.

    Glass dust presents an entirely different hazard. Every damn particle is a collection of mini razor blades.

  5. #5
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by Virgil5 View Post
    Once the sand is melted & combined with lime and other ingredients the silica hazard found in sand pretty much disappears. Refining silica back out of glass is about as possible as breaking down Freon 12 in the upper atmosphere.

    Glass dust presents an entirely different hazard. Every damn particle is a collection of mini razor blades.
    I listed a couple of what I believe to be accurate sources and you reply with what seems logical but with no backup. Don't get me wrong, I am not trying to convince anyone that it is ok to breathe glass dust, but rather than repeating what has been told and re told time and time again like an old wives tale I am trying to get to the bottom of this. Folks work in cement manufacturing and production plants, they work in massive rock quarries where there is always dust flying around. We breathe enough silica dust on dirt roads throughout our lives. All of this stuff is microscopically jagged. How is glass dust any more jagged and dangerous?

  6. #6
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by Ullihundi View Post
    I listed a couple of what I believe to be accurate sources and you reply with what seems logical but with no backup. Don't get me wrong, I am not trying to convince anyone that it is ok to breathe glass dust, but rather than repeating what has been told and re told time and time again like an old wives tale I am trying to get to the bottom of this. Folks work in cement manufacturing and production plants, they work in massive rock quarries where there is always dust flying around. We breathe enough silica dust on dirt roads throughout our lives. All of this stuff is microscopically jagged. How is glass dust any more jagged and dangerous?
    2 ways to find out; Buy a magnifying glass and look at the particle or breathe it and watch the blood drip out of your nose.

    If you elect to go with the breathe and bleed option, please take and post pictures.
    Your results may vary, you may be superman, although I have my doubts.

  7. #7
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by Virgil5 View Post
    2 ways to find out; Buy a magnifying glass and look at the particle or breathe it and watch the blood drip out of your nose.

    If you elect to go with the breathe and bleed option, please take and post pictures.
    Your results may vary, you may be superman, although I have my doubts.
    Remember: "If you're not bleeding you're not working hard enough"
    I am using ground glass in my blast cabinet which is now empty and clean since I had to go over the seams with caulk. My dust collection system works very well and I don't even have any vision obstructing dust flying around in my cabinet. I am drilling a hole in the wall behind it for the exhaust just to be safe. What dust generating tools/equipment do you use and how do you mitigate dust exposure?

  8. #8
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

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  9. #9
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    As a kid I did some welding on a glass crusher at a recycling plant in St. Louis. Piles, and piles, of glass. Separate piles for different colors too. They didn't grind it, just crushed it from bottles and plates to particles about the size of an exploded tempered back glass in a automobile. These piles were then loaded into rail cars which were covered before departing. Don't know where the material went for secondary processing. Train cars, (hopper types) were loaded with a belt convey with two large end loaders loading the conveyor hopper at the same time. Don't remember it being dusty but sure was noisy.
    Slob

    Purveyor of intimate unparalleled knowledge of nothing about everything.

    Oh yeah, also an unabashed internet "Troll" too.....

  10. #10
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    I sure hope no one on this forum is snorting or smoking glass, that sh!t will really Fu@k up your head.

  11. #11
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    2 ways to crush glass for recycling. 1 is a hammermill design that creates a lot of fines. Fines are great for media blasting if you have processing. Processing means washing and sifting to get rid of labels. Fines are also good for making products like concrete counter tops and other things I don't know of.

    2nd way of crushing glass for recycling is a spiked roller crusher similar to the crushers used on coal and limestone. That doesn't create many fines.

    Back when everybody went environuts in the 80s, recycling got big, and bankers threw money at people with business plans to recycle bottles. First generation plants were clusterfugis with all kinds of conveyor and wimmen sitting at computers next to the conveyor to enter the bottle owner's ID for payment. Made good coin building 3 of those plants. You can make money using air tools the conveyor manufacturer never thought of till the manufacturer learns what you're doing and puts his own erection crew together. Such is life.

    You make more money revising the plant because the management has no idea the blower that moves empty cans from dump hopper to bailer needs to be balanced. Of course they only called us after they broke the 3rd replacement motor free from its mounting flange. Made more money on the cogeneration system till Diesel went above 87˘ a gallon.

    Whole lot of waste of labor in recycling empty containers. Lot of fun too like when a genius decides to pile bales of cardboard and put trusses across the top. We refused the truss job so they brought in a cheap weldunce contractor. Guess what? Bales of compressed cardboard so burn. They also pizz off firemen who have to pull them apart and drown them.

    Just to make Slob happy, the contractor running 40 yard containers in used Macks. Guy hauling off bales of metal, cardboard & glass was all Peterbilt. Glass went to a bottle plant for remelt for colored glass bottles.
    The heavy money in the operation was in selling the plant to a new owner who knew less than the first owner.

  12. #12
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    I have my doubts about any government agency when it comes to safety...do you all remember the EPA stating the air around ground zero in NYC after the towers came down is safe to breath???

    In a series of public statements issued after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assured the people of New York that the air around ground zero was safe to breathe. ... The EPA's proclamation of safe air was premature and, as it turned out, wrong.
    World Trade Center Rescue Workers Believed EPA, Ended Up Sick ...
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...sgILnI0yzYmtGb

  13. #13
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Even if the glass dust was harmless, some of the things blasted give off some truly interesting particulates.

  14. #14
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    That glass plant where I was had unloading docks where a truck would back up to a pit with crusher jaws and an auger in the bottom which would take the glass to a washing vat to remove labels, glues, paint, etc before being processed into the piles described earlier. Everything about that plant was loud in operation but they'd have a steady stream of trucks in and out all day long. They even took laminated glass and were able to separate the glass from the plastic but I don't know how.

    It's all gone now replaced with a box store lumberyard and most of the former residential neighborhood is built up commercial; and empty as the base has left.
    Slob

    Purveyor of intimate unparalleled knowledge of nothing about everything.

    Oh yeah, also an unabashed internet "Troll" too.....

  15. #15
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Plastic floats on water, glass sinks.
    Probably caustic in the first stage bath to remove labels & glue.

    Possibly closed down by tree huggers.

  16. #16
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbytime View Post
    I have my doubts about any government agency when it comes to safety...do you all remember the EPA stating the air around ground zero in NYC after the towers came down is safe to breath???

    In a series of public statements issued after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assured the people of New York that the air around ground zero was safe to breathe. ... The EPA's proclamation of safe air was premature and, as it turned out, wrong.
    World Trade Center Rescue Workers Believed EPA, Ended Up Sick ...
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...sgILnI0yzYmtGb
    are you saying the air around the wtc cleanup site wasn't safe?
    i.u.o.e. # 15
    queens, ny and sunny fla

  17. #17
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    I have a plan. Let's build a room the size of a school bus and cut loose with "nuisance" material for 6 hours per day for 3 months.They can leave for one hour to get a "lunch at BK or Mcd or other " approved" fine food establishments. These will be "experts' from OSHA. One year later lets review everything and see the results. 50 govt idiots should be sufficient for a semi-accurate conclusion.
    Last edited by Bonzoo; 12-01-2018 at 08:03 PM.

  18. #18
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonzoo View Post
    I have a plan. Let's build a room the size of a school bus and cut loose with "nuisance" martial for 6 hours per day for 3 months.They can leave for one hour to get a "lunch at BK or Mcd or other " approved" fine food establishments. These will be "experts' from OSHA. One year later lets review everything and see the results. 50 govt idiots should be sufficient for a semi-accurate conclusion.
    But the Government only has our best interest in mind...
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  19. #19
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth


  20. #20
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Ok I'll get this post back on track.
    At work we use a large shop vac attached to the vent port of the blast cabinet.
    Besides keeping the air in the shop clean it also keeps the air INSIDE the cabinet clean meaning
    you can actually see what you are blasting!
    Another side benefit is the negative pressure inside the cabinet created by the shop vac keeps the
    glass from leaking out of every tiny point that is not perfectly sealed.
    Glass abrasive on concrete is about equal to greased glass in coefficient of friction!

  21. #21
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by rexcormack View Post
    Ok I'll get this post back on track.
    At work we use a large shop vac attached to the vent port of the blast cabinet.
    Besides keeping the air in the shop clean it also keeps the air INSIDE the cabinet clean meaning
    you can actually see what you are blasting!
    Another side benefit is the negative pressure inside the cabinet created by the shop vac keeps the
    glass from leaking out of every tiny point that is not perfectly sealed.
    Glass abrasive on concrete is about equal to greased glass in coefficient of friction!
    Thanks for your input. My little bucket head vacuum does the same for my application. I can see clearly while blasting with no dust to obstruct my vision.

  22. #22

    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by docwelder View Post
    are you saying the air around the wtc cleanup site wasn't safe?
    There is carbon and metal dust in concrete that will kill you quick. Concrete manufactures denied carbon being in cement for years, finally they came out and admitted that there is carbon in cement. Carbon dust forms very nasty compounds in the lungs that damage the lungs.

    Sincerely,

    William McCormick
    If I wasn't so.....crazy, I wouldn't try to act normal, and you would be afraid.

  23. #23
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick View Post
    There is carbon and metal dust in concrete that will kill you quick. Concrete manufactures denied carbon being in cement for years, finally they came out and admitted that there is carbon in cement. Carbon dust forms very nasty compounds in the lungs that damage the lungs.

    Sincerely,

    William McCormick
    i meant to hit the sarcasm button on that post. i was at the wtc site before the crowd and equipment got there and sucked down a lot of concrete dust and god knows what else. christine whitman said it was safe so what do i got to worry about?
    i.u.o.e. # 15
    queens, ny and sunny fla

  24. #24
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Pretty much any small dust will contaminate lungs.

    Rag shop workers called it brown lung.. Coal miners called it Black Lung.
    SSDD

  25. #25
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    Re: Glass Dust exposure - misconceptions vs truth

    Many sand basting operations will not blast with regular sand and choose black sand from crushed furnace slag. What I was told was that the black sand did not produce the silica dust and the particles were more sharp doing a better job. It certainly produces less dust in the air around the operation. Another choice for blasting media is steel shot.

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