"Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    RI
    Posts
    56

    "Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity

    I just repaired an antique blacksmithing post vise, and had a notion to halt and prevent future corrosion by treating it to a coat of CRC "Rust Converter". However while cleaning up, I noticed the following statement under "Supplemental Information" in the safety data sheet:

    "When exposed to extreme heat or hot surfaces, vapors may decompose to harmful or fatal corrosive gases such as hydrogen chloride and possibly phosgene."

    Obviously, a blacksmith vise will more than occasionally see heat and hot surfaces. I'm not a big fan of chemical weapons such as phosgene. Well-publicized fatalities due to TIG welding over chlorinated brake cleaner residue highlight the damage done by tiny amounts of this poison.

    I shot CRC tech support an email, will post any answers I get, but I wonder if anyone here knows: does this warning apply only to the uncured liquid product, or is it a property of the cured coating in perpetuity?

    The latter would suggest any object so coated is, in effect, a poison gas bomb for anyone who might try to cut, grind or weld on it in the future. Many recommended applications ("cars, truck frames/beds, boats and trailers, railings, fences, iron or steel furniture, equipment, tools and more") will definitely see welding, grinding and cutting at some point.

    Assuming the worst, does anyone know of a good way to remove such a coating? Bit of a catch-22 if you can't safely grind or power brush it. Chem strippers might work, but don't they use dichloromethane?

    Let me know if you have any relevant experience. A safe and happy 2019 to all!

    -Zed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Soda springs,Id
    Posts
    4,725

    Re: "Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity

    An occasional light coat of 80w90 gear oil will prevent rust.
    Mike
    Ol' Stonebreaker
    "Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes"

    Miller 175 mig
    Miller thunderbolt ac/dc stick
    Victor O/A setup
    Makita chop saw

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Not there
    Posts
    3,929

    Re: "Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity

    Sandblast it and then wash it with Red Devil lye. Then paint the damn thing with 1400 degree BBQ paint

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    252

    Re: "Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity

    If the CRC stuff is anything like Ospho, it's not a preventative for long term rust prevention. If the vise will be used regularly, I'd just wipe it down with oil every once in a while. If it's not going to be used, spray it with cosmoline.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Central Indiana
    Posts
    5,124

    Re: "Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity

    How about a needle scaler, it should get into tight spots and clean the surface good enough you shouldn't have to do anything but coated it with beeswax to protect it from rusting.

    https://www.keepingbackyardbees.com/...or-metal-work/
    I've been everywhere but the electric chair, seen everything but the wind...the only two things I can't weld is the crack of dawn and a broken heart!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    RI
    Posts
    56

    Re: "Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity

    Here's the reply from CRC Technical Services.


    On Jan 3, 2019, at 11:53 AM, Technical Services <techservice@crcind.com> wrote:

    Hello sir,

    Thanks for choosing CRC products. I would not recommend this product for the application below at 1100 degrees C. This is beyond the normal use of this product. I would also not recommend welding near it. At that temperature it is possible that the coating may decompose and produce hazardous fumes. To remove the product, I would recommend using abrasion as long as the surface is between 50F and 90F. If you have further questions please let me know. Have a good day.

    Best regards,

    XXX YYYYYY
    Technical Service
    CRC Industries, Inc.
    (800) 521-3168
    The stuff will be coming off, of course. I'm a little embarrassed but also concerned; here is what I wrote back to them. Most of us from time to time find ourselves welding, cutting or grinding on some old hardware covered in mystery paint; I'm sure going to think twice next time.

    Dear Mr. XXXX-

    Thank you very much for your reply, I appreciate that I might have made a grave mistake otherwise.

    In the constructive spirit of safety, it appears to me that essentially _all_ applications listed for the product*, at an age and condition where they would need rust mitigation, would be expected to encounter welding, grinding, heat straightening or torch cutting at some point in their future, whether for repair or for eventual disposal. This poisoning hazard will be invisible to future workers, exposing them without their knowledge.

    Please consider whether the product marketing and packaging should highlight the hazard more prominently, and whether recommended uses of the product should be explicitly restricted, to prevent avoidable injury or death.

    *("Vehicles, trailers, railings, bridges, equipment, overhead cranes, pipelines, storage tanks, transmission towers, fences chairs, tables, dumpsters, etc…”)

    Sincerely,

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    33

    Re: "Rust Converter" coating heat stability and toxicity

    Yeah. I just looked up the MSDS. The magic ingredient is "vinylidene dichloride acrylic copolymer latex" and the chlorine in that is what gives me pause. I wouldn't mess with that at high temperatures, either.

    If you're worried about rust long-term, I'd hit it with a needle scaler, then wax it, as tackit suggested. Occasional applications of something like Boeshield or Cosmoline might be helpful too.

    cl

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