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  1. #26
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    Sep 2013
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    Re: 140 amp mig question

    I use a pure sine wave power inverter and lithium battery to power my little 120v welder.
    No generator required.
    https://weldingweb.com/showthread.ph...owering-welder
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  2. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    3,935

    Re: 140 amp mig question

    I just use my Klutch MP140si plugged into a standard 20 amp 120 outlet.. It surprising how much power you can get out off new little machine. Just flat out blows away the passport I owned or ony Lincoln/Miller/ Thermal-arc 140/Hobart standard mig too.. Started to really notice the difference with the Thermal-arc 211 120/240 machines. If people are using those other type of older machines to compare to the newest 120 units, then it's not telling what the story is now..
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  3. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Laredo, Tx
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    3,826

    Re: 140 amp mig question

    Quote Originally Posted by mad welder 4 View Post
    I use a pure sine wave power inverter and lithium battery to power my little 120v welder.
    No generator required.
    https://weldingweb.com/showthread.ph...owering-welder
    Pics or it never happened!
    1st on WeldingWeb to have a scrolling signature!

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  4. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Cascade mountains
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    74

    Re: 140 amp mig question

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrapman Industries View Post
    I was just wondering if it could weld 1/8" plate off the 110 side with a max amp output being 140. I've never welded with a 110v machine before so I don't really know. I also couldn't find anything on the internet on running this machine off 110v.
    Yes you can.

    Its not that you can't find this info on the internet, it's that what you CAN find is so fulla BS, people saying it can't be done etc. People saying it's dicey. People setting the rig at MAX power to weld 1/8" then they pop a 15A breaker in the garage. And then they think it's"duty cycle" and pat themselves on the back for outwelding their machine. All hogwash. Well that's cuz those folks are "dicey welders" but now they have a machine to blame. And the problem was they set the machine too high due to internet advice, or popped their worn-out circuit breaker.

    And the other folks just don't know, they just "type" on the internet.

    Of course it can be done and done well. 110v MIGs are not "new" they've been around for what, 30 years? They work well and are very handy. I suppose there are junk ones out there, but if you're buying a new machine red/blue/green etc, you will get one that works well (if not $99.95).

    Typically a 110v machine can weld 1/8 very well on a 15Amp household circuit, (note 1/8" is not full-bore for a 110v machine). Modern 110v machines weld 3/16" very well. 1/4 and thicker can be done .... with more knowledge (but not much). And thicker can be done with even more knowledge and technique (and sometimes preheat for heavy items).

    But back to your question..... 1/8" is child's play for a (good) 110v MIG.

    Probably the best thing to do is trust the MFR's specs. If red/blue/orange/green spec their machine for 3/16" then you KNOW that 1/8" is well within the specs, and they're kinda like way more expert than "the internet", right?

    What you need the internet for..... is whether it can weld MORE than the specs (which it can). And HOW to do it (if such things are beyond your current skill level).
    Last edited by J_Akuhead; 01-20-2019 at 08:43 PM.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Eastern Pa
    Posts
    134

    Re: 140 amp mig question

    Quote Originally Posted by J_Akuhead View Post
    Yes you can.

    Its not that you can't find this info on the internet, it's that what you CAN find is so fulla BS, people saying it can't be done etc. People saying it's dicey. People setting the rig at MAX power to weld 1/8" then they pop a 15A breaker in the garage. And then they think it's"duty cycle" and pat themselves on the back for outwelding their machine. All hogwash. Well that's cuz those folks are "dicey welders" but now they have a machine to blame. And the problem was they set the machine too high due to internet advice, or popped their worn-out circuit breaker.

    And the other folks just don't know, they just "type" on the internet.

    Of course it can be done and done well. 110v MIGs are not "new" they've been around for what, 30 years? They work well and are very handy. I suppose there are junk ones out there, but if you're buying a new machine red/blue/green etc, you will get one that works well (if not $99.95).

    Typically a 110v machine can weld 1/8 very well on a 15Amp household circuit, (note 1/8" is not full-bore for a 110v machine). Modern 110v machines weld 3/16" very well. 1/4 and thicker can be done .... with more knowledge (but not much). And thicker can be done with even more knowledge and technique (and sometimes preheat for heavy items).

    But back to your question..... 1/8" is child's play for a (good) 110v MIG.

    Probably the best thing to do is trust the MFR's specs. If red/blue/orange/green spec their machine for 3/16" then you KNOW that 1/8" is well within the specs, and they're kinda like way more expert than "the internet", right?

    What you need the internet for..... is whether it can weld MORE than the specs (which it can). And HOW to do it (if such things are beyond your current skill level).
    Thats kinda what I was looking for. I mean I have seen a video online where someone was welding on 110v but their electrical situation was about as bad as mine which is kinda why I run the generator at home anyway even if I'm only using the grinder. So I wasn't really sure what the actual real life capabilities of these machines are having never really used one myself. I know the packaging says one thing but thats under so and so parameters having the most ideal electrical situation. Taking just a random average circuit and doing real life things with it is what I was looking for. Although I am now pondering about the suitcase. Never ran one of them either. But I feel like just being able to throw a welder in the truck and not have to worry about a generator of any sorts would still be beneficial. I could even just get a strap and carry a welder and grinder on my bicycle or motorcycle if I really wanted to in some situations. Would get rid of alot of headaches sometimes. since my generator storage situation also isn't ideal. one day I'll have a shop and a dually ready to go where I can just flip a switch and drag a cord. but today is not that day.
    Last edited by Scrapman Industries; 01-23-2019 at 01:20 AM.

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    3,262

    Re: 140 amp mig question

    what is the weight of the intupulse welder. Take the batteries out and use them with a Readywelder. I cannot see that being practical for remote welding. Looks cool, though.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Cascade mountains
    Posts
    74

    Re: 140 amp mig question

    I've been using a suitcase welder (Miller Multi-Matic 200 MIG/TIG/Stick 120/240v) for years and it suits me well. I've never seen or read about modern battery welders before so this was interesting. I know jeepers have pooled their 12v batteries together and weld themselves out of the woods (for years).

    Here's a Welding tips & Tricks review of the Hobart Trek 180 (battery powered MIG).



    I know very well the hassle of stringing electrical cords, carrying generators around etc just to make 4 inches of weld, then put it all away. By far the biggest part of the job was "carrying stuff" and the weld was 2% of the work. A battery welder that can weld even 20 inches would be extremely useful, just like the 18v tools that have RULED for 20 years now. And some people still think 18v tools are just "modern homeowner gimmicks". Probably mostly on the internet.

    Puzzling how the internet can leave so many people in the dark.
    Like me,,,,, I'd never even heard of the Hobart Trek 180!! (and now it's gone). But there's no stopping the cut-the-cord revolution, there will be a replacement.

    The Hobart Trek 180 battery powered MIG welded 80 to 100 inches off one battery charge. That's more than a whole day for LOTS of (real world) fabrication. But the Trek 180 has disappeared from the Hobart website, and nothing comes up for the search "battery" or "portable" so apparently something went wrong. https://www.hobartwelders.com/search?term=trek%20180#/

    Interesting stuff and we all knew that day was coming.
    Last edited by J_Akuhead; 01-23-2019 at 12:32 PM.

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