Stainless Steel Safety
RSS | Subscribe | Contact Us | Advertise | About Us
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1

    Stainless Steel Safety

    I have done a bit of stainless mig welding (mostly just tacking up, and way less then 8 hours total) in my attached garage. Any cutting has been done with a bandsaw, though the parts were also cleaned up with wire wheels and used flap discs.

    Aside from opening the garage door and wearing a 3m 2097 respirator for lung protection, should I be concerned with clothing getting contaminated?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Hamlin, NY
    Posts
    1,294

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    No

    Sent from my LM-Q710.FG using Tapatalk
    Ryan

    Miller Multimatic 200 tig/spool gun/wireless remote
    Millermatic 350P, Bernard/XR Python guns
    Miller Dynasty 350, Coolmate 3.5 & wireless remote
    CK WF1 TIG wire feeder
    Miller Spectrum 375 Xtreme
    Optrel e684
    Miller Digital Elite
    Miller Weld-Mask

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Lockhart,Tx (BBQ capitol of the world)
    Posts
    980

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    Contaminated with what?

    Stainless welding is the cleanest welding you will ever do!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Not there
    Posts
    3,930

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    I's be VERY concerned with the clothes being contaminated. By that boleshiit your ol lady gets for soap and fabric softener.
    A lil 304/308/316 dust....might make your ballz itch if it doesnt come out in the spin cycle.
    Good choice of a respirator. The wheel is far worse than the steel

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal-LA
    Posts
    9,231

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonzoo View Post
    I's be VERY concerned with the clothes being contaminated. By that boleshiit your ol lady gets for soap and fabric softener.
    A lil 304/308/316 dust....might make your ballz itch if it doesnt come out in the spin cycle.
    Good choice of a respirator. The wheel is far worse than the steel
    Leave your balls it of it. Most probly its that wacky tobacky.
    Weld like a "WELDOR", not a wel-"DERR"
    MillerDynasty700DX,Dynasty350DX3ea,Dynasty200DX,Th ermalArc400GTSW,LincolnSW2002ea., MillerMatic350P,MillerMatic200w/spoolgun,MKCobraMig260,Lincoln SP-170T,PlasmaCam/Hypertherm1250,HFProTig4ea,MigMax1ea.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    499

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    I should hope not... most people don't even bother with a respirator while cutting and TIG welding S/S.

    MIG and stick welding S/S is a different ballgame - according to HSE guidelines it puts out a much larger amount of hexavalent chromium than TIG. Should definitely wear a respirator with that. Nasty lung cancer particles.

    Having said that, I've done my share of stick welding stainless and didn't even realise there was an issue until recently.

    http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr770.pdf quite a decent bit of unbiased research
    Last edited by Munkul; 03-27-2019 at 03:59 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    2,727

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    A buddy who was on a large stainless job said that with all the workplace rules it was easier to assume the worst and put everyone on respirators with clean breathing air supply. That was easier than having environmental consultants run up huge charges determining where the stainless dust and fume was a danger. Once you get used to the apparatus you adapt. Some rigs allow you to regulate the temp of the air from warm to cool according to the temp you are working in.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,873

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    All that gets contaminated is the wire and disc. Never use a wheel for carbon and then use it for stainless.

  9. #9

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    Thanks for the tips! I will check everything here.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Jasper TX
    Posts
    1,405

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    You should be concerned...

    https://www.plymovent.com/us/blogs/w...tainless-steel

    Welding stainless steel produces hexavalent chromium

    Welding of stainless steel is a common process, which has increasing raised concerns for the working environment. Chromium is next to nickel one of the basic alloy element of all groups of stainless steels. During the welding process, chromium is converted to its hexavalent state, Chromium (VI).

    The production of these elements occurring in stainless steel welding fume is believed to have serious effects on the health of welders and people in the welding environment. Cr(VI) fume is highly toxic and can damage the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs and is carcinogenic.

    Methods and fume production
    Manual Metal Arc welding (MMA welding) produces a lot of potentially hazardous welding fumes.The amounts of fumes released during the welding of stainless steel depend largely on the welding method used. The most common methods are:

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG)
    Metal Inert Gas / Metal Active Gas (MIG/MAG)
    About 80% of welding operations use this method:

    Manual Metal Arc (MMA)
    and 5% specialist companies uses for specific applications:

    Flux Cored Arc (FCA)
    TIG produces the least fume although it does produce significant amounts of ozone and nitrous oxide both of which are irritant gases. MIG and MAG generally produce quite a lot more fume. MMA welding and FCA tend to produce the most fumes.



    About 60% of companies take no preventative measures
    Surveys in Great Britain and the USA indicate that one third of welding companies protect their welders against fumes from welding stainless steel with proper and professional ventilation systems. This means that more than 60% of the companies should address this issue and carry out risk assessments with a specialist in ventilation systems and personal protection equipment to improve the working conditions of welders and protect their health.



    Be aware of the risks
    “As a welder you should also be aware of the risks of welding stainless steel”, warns the American specialist Vicki Bell in several publications. “Before beginning a welding job, it is important to identify the hazards for the particular welding operation. The hazards will depend on the type of welding, the materials (base metals, surface coatings, electrodes) to be welded and the environmental conditions (outside or in a confined space).”

    Advice
    She is also very clear in her advice. “Ask for a material safety data sheet (MSDS) to identify the hazardous materials used in welding products and the fumes that may be generated.A mobile filter unit of Plymovent combined with an extraction arm provides effective welding fume extraction. Make sure you know what you are welding before you start. Some fumes, such as those released from welding on a cadmium-plated surface, can be fatal in a short time. After identifying the hazard, implement appropriate control methods.”



    Adequate ventilation needed
    “Use adequate ventilation. Local exhaust ventilation, which removes fumes and gases at the source, is the most effective method. Use a partial enclosure, such as a ventilated workbench, or extraction arm positioned as close to the point of welding as possible. Clean and maintain ventilation systems regularly."
    Owner of Fast Leroy's Bar and Grill
    Liquor up Front, Poker in the Rear

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock
    Posts
    4,658

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    Quote Originally Posted by shovelon View Post
    Leave your balls out it of it. Most probly its that wacky tobacky.
    In Bonzoo's defense,
    He doesn't like to wear underpants.

    could be jungle rot.
    Miller 211
    Hypertherm PM 45
    1961 Lincoln Idealarc 250
    HTP 221


    True Wisdom only comes from Pain.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Western New York State, USA
    Posts
    1,913

    Re: Stainless Steel Safety

    thorium in tungsten when grounding sharp point. its radioactive
    .
    vanadium in some steel is nasty too. old 6010 used to have asbestos in the flux
    .
    if worried about family contamination then dont weld at home. i have met 2 welders that got brain cancer. not sure if job related

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
RSS | Home | Penton Media | Contact Us | Subscribe | For Advertisers | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement