7018ac on a dc machine?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    550

    7018ac on a dc machine?

    Are there any issues or concerns with running 7018ac on a dc machine?
    -Ruark
    Lincoln 3200HD
    Hobart Stickmate LX235
    TWECO Fabricator 211i

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,739

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    nope, works fine
    Millermatic 252
    Syncrowave 250
    Purox Metalmaster

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    124

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    There is a recent thread about Hobart electrodes that reminded me of the same basic topic.

    That got me thinking, so I dug through my miscellaneous pile of rod boxes and found a 1lb box of Hobart 1/8" 7018AC that I have no idea where I got. I had just finished an overhaul/cosmetic refresh on a Miller Dialarc 250 and wanted to test it out, so I used this Hobart rod and ran some beads with it. I'm no pro, but the beads looked really nice, and the slag popped right off...think I was running 125-130amps give or take. I wouldn't hesitate to use them on anything short of code work (which I don't do). I thought they might give off a bit more smoke than I'm used to with Excalibur or Atom Arc, but I didn't do a comparison to be sure.
    Check out my bench vise website:
    http://mivise.com


    Millermatic 251
    Miller Syncrowave 250DX
    Miller Dialarc 250
    Hobart Champion Elite
    Everlast PowerTig 210EXT

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    NW ON Canada
    Posts
    3,255

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruark View Post
    Are there any issues or concerns with running 7018ac on a dc machine?
    No. Works fine.
    Jason
    Lincoln Idealarc 250 stick/tig
    Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
    Miller Bobcat 250
    Torchmate CNC table
    Thermal Arc Hefty 2
    Ironworkers Local 720

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    1,829

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    Only thing I'd want to observe is the depth of fusion...……………..does the AC flavor tend to undercut as much as the DC version. It's been my experience that 7018AC has less "penetration" than 7018DC . I've never run the stuff on DC, so I couldn't really give an opinion on the "dig".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Brethren, Mi
    Posts
    776

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    Runs better on dc

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Western New York State, USA
    Posts
    1,913

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    most dont notice any differences. some 7018AC flux is slightly more fluid and flows or moves about more but welder usually increases rod lean angle slightly and travel faster slightly at slightly higher amps to compensate
    .
    and ALL 7018 is rated for AC its just 7018AC rod is rated for lower open circuit voltage machines with a more stable arc
    .
    its like people hung up over 6010 rod and resist using 6011 rod if it was called it 6010AC instead of 6011 would it make you feel better ??
    .
    if you got a crappy welding machine sure some rods run slightly better than others. get a decent welding machine and you can run any rod you want on it. if you really welding alot like over 1000lbs of weld rod a year at over $2000. cost per year it dont take much to figure buying a better welding machine is worth it. not saying you need a $10,000 welding machine but spending at least $1000. or $2000. for a better welding machine is not unheard of

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Brethren, Mi
    Posts
    776

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    You don't even need to spend that much to get a better machine.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    4,823

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    Agreed, it runs well on either polarity. If there are "nuances" to be found, check the operator.
    City of L.A. Structural; Manual & Semi-Automatic;
    "Surely there is a mine for silver, and a place where gold is refined. Iron is taken from the earth, and copper is smelted from ore."
    Job 28:1,2

    Lincoln, Miller, Victor & ISV Bible

    Danny

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,419

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?


    WNY_TomB


    Quote Originally Posted by WNY_TomB View Post
    most dont notice any differences . . . if you got a crappy welding machine sure
    some rods run slightly better . . .

    . . . cost per year it dont take much to figure buying a better welding machine is
    worth it . . .

    . . . not saying you need a $10,000 welding machine but spending at least
    $1000. or $2000.for a better welding machine is not unheard of
    Informed reply ^ ^ ^ / AKA - the real cost of 'going cheap' on hardware . . .

    Most of the banter - about this machine/over that machine - usually speaks:
    to universality, and whistles and bells . . .

    Rarely, is the 'caliber of current' discussed [save for 'the push' of a SA 200]
    for stationary machines.

    With stick - there is no substitute for heavy copper coils = tall duty cycle = a
    very stable
    : incandescent stream of metallic vapor carried via an electric arc -

    For the unknowing - all TIG welders - are first/foremost stick machines [with
    extensive toys].

    If I were in the market - I'd buy this Boat Anchor . . .
    https://weldingweb.com/showthread.ph...lder-w-chiller

    If all of the TIG functions crapped - it would still be a great stick machine . . .


    Opus

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Brethren, Mi
    Posts
    776

    Re: 7018ac on a dc machine?

    I would just as soon have a DC buzzer if I didn't need the tig. So much more practical and cost less, runs from a number 10 wire.

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