Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Orange, TX
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    Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    If you work around the F-162/163s much, sooner or later (probably sooner) you're going to run across that center intake/exhaust stud that passes thru the manifold is firmly rusted in and the manifold assembly "locked" to the block and won't budge. Whether the nut came off or the stud twisted off flush with the manifold, it would seem there's no way to get it off even with heating the manifold (hard to get to all the "stud" areas to properly heat.
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    There's usually at least one other stud that remains in the block that can't be removed with the manifold in place but if the rest of them do come out, the manifold assembly can be "unscrewed" from the block with the center stud still firmly planted. The lifter cover needs to come off to do so and once the manifold is off, the stud can be pressed out while properly supporting the manifold to prevent breaking it.


    BUT. What if you can't get all the rest of the studs out or another one broke off above the surface preventing the manifold assembly from being turned? That's when you have to "break it to fix it".

    With all the other nuts or nut/studs removed (or broken off), standing opposite the manifold assembly, grab the exhaust pipe and pull toward you to break the remaining long stud off at the block. You'll likely take out the top thread in the stud hole but not to worry as the hole is deep enough to give one up for the cause.
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    Once off, the stub of the stud is easily removed from the block and the rusted in stud can be pressed out - again while properly supporting the manifold. I use a short, hardened pin (held with pliers for stability) to press against the stud to get things started and then finish up with a long drift. Once the stud is out, clean the thru hole out with a drill and to help prevent a repeat of the matter, I use a 7/16" drill for added clearance and anti-sieze on the stud at assembly time.
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    A couple more shots to finish it up . . .
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    MUTT Suitcase Wirefeeder
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  2. #2
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    May 2008
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    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    . . . showing the removed section of stud and quick fix using a long bolt to make a new stud.
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    Thanks for looking.
    MM200 w/Spoolmatic 1
    Syncrowave 180SD
    Bobcat 225G Plus - LP/NG
    MUTT Suitcase Wirefeeder
    WC-1S/Spoolmatic 1
    HF-251D-1
    PakMaster 100XL
    '68 Red Face Code #6633 project
    Star Jet 21-110

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    SoCal
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    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    So, is it through bolted from now on?
    City of L.A. Structural; Manual & Semi-Automatic;
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    Danny

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    11,095

    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Splain Duane, please? It looks thru bolted.
    "Any day above ground is a good day"

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  5. #5
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    May 2008
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    Orange, TX
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    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Post 2, pic 2 shows the full bolt that was used to make the new stud (cut head off and thread) inserted thru the manifold following removal of the remnent of broken stud shown in post 2. pic 1. Done so for illustration only.

    Post 2, pic 3 is the new stud installed in the block and post 2, pic 4 is the manifold temporarily installed on the block with a nut and washer.

    Does that answer the questions? Technically it would be considered "thru-bolted" but using a new stud as original.
    Last edited by duaneb55; 03-16-2012 at 06:51 PM.
    MM200 w/Spoolmatic 1
    Syncrowave 180SD
    Bobcat 225G Plus - LP/NG
    MUTT Suitcase Wirefeeder
    WC-1S/Spoolmatic 1
    HF-251D-1
    PakMaster 100XL
    '68 Red Face Code #6633 project
    Star Jet 21-110

    Save Second Base!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    50

    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Simple and effective.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Works for me..

    ...zap!


    I am not completely insane..
    Some parts are missing

    Professional Driver on a closed course....
    Do not attempt.

    Just because I'm a dumbass don't mean that you can be too.
    So DON'T try any of this **** l do at home.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Pacific Northwest
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    821

    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Photo # 3 - How does that "style" of easy out work for you? That is one of the few that I have not tried. I'm just about to the point of completely drilling out (leaving only the threads) the broken stud and re-tap to clean out old threads.
    Lincoln SA200's... at least 15 - 20. They come and go. Growing partial to the "Short Hoods" in my old age. Last count on Short Hoods was 13 in possession.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Spring Branch,Tx
    Posts
    119

    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Good info, I must of got lucky when I pulled the manifold off my cousin's welder. But then again I soaked them with a mixture of acetone and atf.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    cincinnati
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    429

    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Quote Originally Posted by hobohilton View Post
    Photo # 3 - How does that "style" of easy out work for you? That is one of the few that I have not tried. I'm just about to the point of completely drilling out (leaving only the threads) the broken stud and re-tap to clean out old threads.
    Me too.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Sparks, NV
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    If it ain't broke, then fix it till it is! Nothin worse than extracting broken and rusted bolts.... There was another post recently about using a specific welding rod for extracting broken bolts too. Anyone recall what rod that was? Gotta try that some time. Have to go down to my buddy's wrecking yard and ask him to save me the next junk piece with rusted/broken bolts.
    Tiger Sales: AHP Distributor www.tigersalesco.com
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  12. #12
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    s/e ohio
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    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Quote Originally Posted by soutthpaw View Post
    If it ain't broke, then fix it till it is! Nothin worse than extracting broken and rusted bolts.... There was another post recently about using a specific welding rod for extracting broken bolts too. Anyone recall what rod that was? Gotta try that some time. Have to go down to my buddy's wrecking yard and ask him to save me the next junk piece with rusted/broken bolts.
    I think I posted that in another thread of Duane's

    http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=182101
    If you cant fix it with a hammer, it must be an electrical problem.

    "Boy, everyone starts with a full bag of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before the bag of luck is empty."-Grandad circa 1990ish

  13. #13
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    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Quote Originally Posted by hobohilton View Post
    Photo # 3 - How does that "style" of easy out work for you? That is one of the few that I have not tried. I'm just about to the point of completely drilling out (leaving only the threads) the broken stud and re-tap to clean out old threads.
    Quote Originally Posted by gimpyrobb View Post
    Me too.
    They work very well unless the thread piece that is rusted in is real long and offers far more resistance to breaking loose than grip the tool is capable of providing. If the drill size is of the proper diameter to allow the tool to get a full bite, there's a good chance it won't "strip out" under pressure. The smaller ones have shanks that can actually twist off if the subject bolt/stud is too tough of an opponent.

    This one just spun right out because it wasn't rusted into the block just the manifold.


    Quote Originally Posted by Asolis View Post
    Good info, I must of got lucky when I pulled the manifold off my cousin's welder. But then again I soaked them with a mixture of acetone and atf.
    Trouble is, there's about 3" of this stud that passes thru the manifold and I doubt any amount of soaking would have helped here. Took a far amount of force from the press to push the remaining section out.
    MM200 w/Spoolmatic 1
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    Bobcat 225G Plus - LP/NG
    MUTT Suitcase Wirefeeder
    WC-1S/Spoolmatic 1
    HF-251D-1
    PakMaster 100XL
    '68 Red Face Code #6633 project
    Star Jet 21-110

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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Niagara on the lake Canada
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    Re: Sometimes You Have To Break It To Fix It

    Duane Would this a good time to try heat and a candle? Just wondering if you have tried that or if it would work in a case like this?
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