Page 498 of 498 FirstFirst ... 398448488496497498
Results 12,426 to 12,443 of 12443

Thread: Show us what you welded today

  1. #12426
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    W. Wisc
    Posts
    523
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Makes sense - Thanks. And that is some impressive OF cutting. Mine looks more like the lava that comes from a volcano...
    -Dave
    XMT304 with: 22A Feeder, or HF251 Hi Freq DC TIG air cooled

  2. #12427
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by davec View Post
    Makes sense - Thanks. And that is some impressive OF cutting. Mine looks more like the lava that comes from a volcano...
    Thank you ! Practice practice practice.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. Likes ronsii liked this post
  4. #12428
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Mount Tabor VT
    Posts
    7,164
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Joegreen02 View Post
    Ah! I gotcha. I know exactly what youíre talking about now. Thatís a great idea but with the springs that are going on the hinge Iím not sure it would work out. For what itís worth the ramps will land nice and flat when on the Albertís truck.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes, & I prefer feet on the hinge end of the ramp. Start far enough from the hinge to clear & come down perpendicular to the top of the ramp. Running a heavy wheeled machine up, those ramps will try to lift the ground end as the front tires hit the hinge. You want the feet under the trailer. I've had the ramp lift, placing the weight on the rear of the trailer. It lifts the rear wheels of the truck.

    Lots of bad things can happen when the truck's rear wheels are off the ground!
    I no longer own that trailer!
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  5. #12429
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    MN/WI
    Posts
    368
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie B View Post
    Yes, & I prefer feet on the hinge end of the ramp. Start far enough from the hinge to clear & come down perpendicular to the top of the ramp. Running a heavy wheeled machine up, those ramps will try to lift the ground end as the front tires hit the hinge. You want the feet under the trailer. I've had the ramp lift, placing the weight on the rear of the trailer. It lifts the rear wheels of the truck.

    Lots of bad things can happen when the truck's rear wheels are off the ground!
    I no longer own that trailer!
    Century buzzbox that I learned on 40+ years ago (was Dad's)
    Crappy Century 110volt mig 70 amp pigeon pooper.
    Lincoln Idealarc TIG-300

  6. Likes Munkul liked this post
  7. #12430
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Mount Tabor VT
    Posts
    7,164
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by bead-boy View Post
    Never done anything as dramatic as those examples, but ramps lifting while loading and or the rear wheels lifting while loading on a downhill get real spooky fast!

    I had a three axle trailer with poorly designed ramps. The pavement in front of my home is a 6% pitch downhill. To do that, you need as many chocks as you have tires!
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  8. #12431
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Made a simple portable hay feeder out of scrap today. Wanted to see if I could make something that would help waste less hay. Seems to be working real well the first couple days. Already has saved me a day of not putting out hay.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #12432
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by AgDawg15 View Post
    Made a simple portable hay feeder out of scrap today. Wanted to see if I could make something that would help waste less hay. Seems to be working real well the first couple days. Already has saved me a day of not putting out hay.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Sweet! I like that.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. Likes 12V71 liked this post
  11. #12433
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today



    The sum of my day. Bastard thing. I fixed it, found some new nuts, tightened them up and tacked them in place. Aggravating thing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. Likes 12V71, ronsii liked this post
  13. #12434
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Central Wa. state
    Posts
    4,073
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Joegreen02 View Post


    The sum of my day. Bastard thing. I fixed it, found some new nuts, tightened them up and tacked them in place. Aggravating thing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "Tacking nuts" "aggravating thing"... I think I have 2 of them in a milk crate somewhere, leftovers from the processing plant turn-arounds. 20' lift half ton capacity, it never failed when you were 3" from home plate the stupid thing would jump the hand chain and get bound up.

  14. Likes ronsii liked this post
  15. #12435
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by 12V71 View Post
    "Tacking nuts" "aggravating thing"... I think I have 2 of them in a milk crate somewhere, leftovers from the processing plant turn-arounds. 20' lift half ton capacity, it never failed when you were 3" from home plate the stupid thing would jump the hand chain and get bound up.
    1 ton capacity this thing... Reese model, but I have never used a single one of these things that didnít piss me right the hell off. From the jets to harbor freights. Absolutely never fails to jump a link. Especially once you get in a good groove up or down.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  16. Likes ronsii, 12V71 liked this post
  17. #12436
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Mount Tabor VT
    Posts
    7,164
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Joegreen02 View Post
    1 ton capacity this thing... Reese model, but I have never used a single one of these things that didn’t piss me right the hell off. From the jets to harbor freights. Absolutely never fails to jump a link. Especially once you get in a good groove up or down.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Gee, farmers all had them rigged to a track & hopper rig. manure corn or sawdust was put in a hopper, toted around the barn. These were used in pretty adverse conditions. I've never known one to fail. Every repair garage in the world had them for engines or lifting one end of a car.

    The Cold Storage, a business that supplied ferns to florists had a big elevator to move pallets of ferns to the second floor. They used one.

    The mortuary, never in business in my lifetime, still has one.

    Of course, those were all good quality American made machines.

    I've always wanted one.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  18. Likes Joegreen02 liked this post
  19. #12437
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    1,170
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Joegreen02 View Post
    1 ton capacity this thing... Reese model, but I have never used a single one of these things that didnít piss me right the hell off. From the jets to harbor freights. Absolutely never fails to jump a link. Especially once you get in a good groove up or down.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    We have Yale, Trifor, Tractel and a few other good brands in our workshop... worth it. Never a problem with jumping chains. The Yale blocks are particularly good, as the control chainwheel has a swivelling guide/shroud on it, so the only way you can get it wrong is if you tangle the chains yourself.

    Then again, this stuff is all inspected 6 monthly, so anything dodgy would go straight in the bin.
    Confirmation bias is the tendency to search for, interpret, favour, and recall information in a way that confirms or supports one's prior beliefs or values.

  20. #12438
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    420
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    IDK if we're all talking about the same thing, but a guy I knew here in town was killed when the tractor he was driving onto his trailer raised the rear wheels of his truck causing the trailer and truck to travel backwards down his drive way. He had no way to stop it and the tractor ultimately fell on him when the trailer jackknifed throwing the tractor off. He was still on the tractor which landed on him. He would be alive today had he not tried to load on a slant and if he had legs under the pivot points on the ramps. He had done it this way at least a hundred times.

  21. #12439
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie B View Post
    Gee, farmers all had them rigged to a track & hopper rig. manure corn or sawdust was put in a hopper, toted around the barn. These were used in pretty adverse conditions. I've never known one to fail. Every repair garage in the world had them for engines or lifting one end of a car.

    The Cold Storage, a business that supplied ferns to florists had a big elevator to move pallets of ferns to the second floor. They used one.

    The mortuary, never in business in my lifetime, still has one.

    Of course, those were all good quality American made machines.

    I've always wanted one.
    Just to be clear they are quite reliable at lifting. Iíve never had one fail and drop an object. Itís just the drive chain that is problematic. I agree. I had one at a time that was older than me and never had a single issue. Iím sure if I spent a little more coin on one I could alleviate my frustration


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  22. #12440
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Mount Tabor VT
    Posts
    7,164
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Joegreen02 View Post
    Just to be clear they are quite reliable at lifting. I’ve never had one fail and drop an object. It’s just the drive chain that is problematic. I agree. I had one at a time that was older than me and never had a single issue. I’m sure if I spent a little more coin on one I could alleviate my frustration


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I don't know if they are available these days. Never had enough loose cash to go searching. A very good come along is $300. While it is not as nice for lifting, it is more versatile. I've made do with come along. I do find it impossible having so many sons. These days I hide one for my use. I think I own four very nice ones, & one nobody would borrow.
    Last time the world came to an end, I needed a come along, all had been "borrowed", Mrs B took action.

    I can't say what MINE cost. It is nice! Several months the boys didn't know I had it. Now it takes extra effort keeping it hidden.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  23. Likes Joegreen02 liked this post
  24. #12441
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Central Wa. state
    Posts
    4,073
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Joegreen02 View Post
    Just to be clear they are quite reliable at lifting. I’ve never had one fail and drop an object. It’s just the drive chain that is problematic. I agree. I had one at a time that was older than me and never had a single issue. I’m sure if I spent a little more coin on one I could alleviate my frustration


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    That's been my experience too, the cheap sheetmetal guide for the hand chain comes loose and lets the chain jump, the nuts that hold it on have to be tacked to the studs. I've even had the same issue with a "budget" model CM hoist.

  25. Likes ronsii, Joegreen02 liked this post
  26. #12442
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    We use CM and Yale's at work. Never had an issue so far.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  27. Likes Joegreen02 liked this post
  28. #12443
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    4,030
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by AgDawg15 View Post
    Made a simple portable hay feeder out of scrap today. Wanted to see if I could make something that would help waste less hay. Seems to be working real well the first couple days. Already has saved me a day of not putting out hay.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm not bein' an azzhole, but I think that feeder won't survive the Winter. Cows tear up just about anything. I make my feeders out of channel, and square tubing......weigh about 400ish pounds. We have seven of them, and the oldest dates back around 17 years. The other two, set up for loaderless use, are in the 5-600lb range.

    I know portability is an issue with a lot of folks, but it costs you dearly in the long run.

    I'm not trying to be mean about it, just pragmatic.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,611,785,562.73983 seconds with 13 queries