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Thread: Fishing Rod Holder

  1. #1
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    Fishing Rod Holder

    Ray my customer and friend sent me a drawing and a solid model of the fishing rod holder that he wanted me to machine and weld for him. He also sent me all of the required stock. He designed it on AutoCAD inventor so I pulled the solid model in the STEP format into SolidWorks, so that I could use it.

    1. SolidWorks Model of Rod Holder
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    If I were still working, I would have printed the part full size on our $50,000 roll plotter at work, but I retired in the end of June, so I laid it out full size on piece of paper that I cut from a paper bag. (How far we fall.) I used my Fireball squares to line up the end plates and I rested each end of the tube on a 1” magnetic block also from Fireball Tool Company to hold it off the table. I held the tube in place with two 2” x 2” x 1” magnetic blocks pressed against the side of the tubes on each end.

    2. Magnetic blocks to hold parts in place
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    If you look closely in the following picture you can see my layout pencil lines.

    3. Close up of blocks
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    Next, I positioned all of the parts in the fixture.

    4. Holding pieces in place
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    In this picture you can see how the 1” block holds the tube off the table and how the 2” blocks hold the tube in place sideways.

    5. Close up of magnetic blocks
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    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport
    Lincoln LE 31 MP & Lincoln 210 MP

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  3. #2
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    Ray ordered the blocks from On Line Metals cut to the correct size so I didn’t bother to square them up on the Bridgeport. I drilled and tapped the holes as required and then routered the corners on the router table using carbide tipped piloted router bits.

    6. Plates machined.
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    7. Router table setup
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    Below is a picture of all of the parts ready for welding.

    8. All pieces machined
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    I welded together some scrap Aluminum to try out my settings and to see if I required the 75% Ar 25% He gas that I have. I used an oxyacetylene torch with a rosebud to preheat the block to 250°F. Then I welded them with my underpowered Dynasty 200 TIG welder running full out.

    9. Test weld
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    Settings:

    A/C Current output: 200 amps.
    Balance: 65% Electrode Negative
    Frequency: 100 Hz
    Electrode: 3/32” Tri Mix from Arc Zone.
    Shielding Gas: Straight Argon
    Shielding flow rate: 15 CFH

    As you can see it worked ok, but I would have liked to use a larger TIG welder if I had one.

    I normally grind the tip of my Tungsten electrodes to a 30° angle. I found that when I used this angle the end of the electrode melted away as shown below. The picture on the top is as ground and the others are after use.

    10. Tapered electrode
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    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport
    Lincoln LE 31 MP & Lincoln 210 MP

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  5. #3
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    So, I ground some of the electrodes at a steeper angle as shown below. Again, the picture on the top is as ground.

    11. Blunt electrode
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    I felt that this was acceptable so I moved ahead with my welding project. What else could be done?

    -Use a larger diameter electrode like 1/8”
    -Use an even blunter angle
    -Tried a higher balance setting like 70 or 75% EN
    -Use a spherical end to the electrode, (like we all used to use with pure tungsten with a transformer welder).

    I found that it was more difficult to weld the actual parts compared to my test piece, because both the tubes and the plates were more massive and soaked up more heat. I could establish a puddle, but it was difficult to move it along. I wished that I could push the pedal more.

    12. Small plate welded
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    13. Large plate welded
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    14. All done
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    -Don
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport
    Lincoln LE 31 MP & Lincoln 210 MP

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  7. #4
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    Something isn’t right. With a dynasty you should have a tiny ball on the end. That’s why the welding was hard to do. Looks pretty good for how those tungstens look

  8. #5
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    Quote Originally Posted by motolife313 View Post
    Something isn’t right. With a dynasty you should have a tiny ball on the end. That’s why the welding was hard to do. Looks pretty good for how those tungstens look
    I agree, something is off. Even my old Airco transformer at 50/50 balance didn't damage them that bad.

    Cool project though
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Airco 300 - Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
    MM210
    Dialarc
    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

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  10. #6
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    Quote Originally Posted by Don52 View Post
    What else could be done?
    Definitely go to the helium mix on that. I typically use a 50/50 mix for stuff like that, but the 75/25 would still be way better than straight argon.

    Higher balance setting would benefit you as well, both for overall heat input as well as tungsten erosion. On my power supply (not a Dynasty), 80% is the happy place for that type of part on clean metal.

    Turning your frequency down a little bit can help, too. You're effectively going through zero momentarily with each cycle, so decreasing the cycles lessens the time you're sitting at zero.
    Last edited by bassboy1; 2 Days Ago at 11:35 PM.
    Who is John Galt?

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  12. #7
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    Quote Originally Posted by bassboy1 View Post
    Definitely go to the helium mix on that. I typically use a 50/50 mix for stuff like that, but the 75/25 would still be way better than straight argon.

    Higher balance setting would benefit you as well. On my power supply (not a Dynasty), 80% is the happy place for that type of part on clean metal.

    Turning your frequency down a little bit can help, too. You're effectively going through zero momentarily with each cycle, so decreasing the cycles lessens the time you're sitting at zero.
    Nice catch, I didn't read that part of his settings
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Airco 300 - Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
    MM210
    Dialarc
    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

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  14. #8
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    Quote Originally Posted by motolife313 View Post
    Something isn’t right. With a dynasty you should have a tiny ball on the end. That’s why the welding was hard to do. Looks pretty good for how those tungstens look
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaDave View Post
    I agree, something is off. Even my old Airco transformer at 50/50 balance didn't damage them that bad.

    Cool project though
    Quote Originally Posted by bassboy1 View Post
    Definitely go to the helium mix on that. I typically use a 50/50 mix for stuff like that, but the 75/25 would still be way better than straight argon.

    Higher balance setting would benefit you as well, both for overall heat input as well as tungsten erosion. On my power supply (not a Dynasty), 80% is the happy place for that type of part on clean metal.

    Turning your frequency down a little bit can help, too. You're effectively going through zero momentarily with each cycle, so decreasing the cycles lessens the time you're sitting at zero.
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaDave View Post
    Nice catch, I didn't read that part of his settings
    Experimentation on Rod Holder Welds

    Thanks for all of the comments. I considered all comments and came up with the following conclusions. There are two major problems:

    I. Damage to the electrodes.
    II. Not-enough-heat for puddle to flow smoothly.

    To solve the damage to the electrodes problem I did the following:

    - Increased the electrode diameter from 3/32” to 1/8”
    - Increased the balance from 65% EN to 70% EN.
    - Ground a spherical shape on the end of the electrode

    To solve the not-enough-heat problem I did the following:

    - Used 75% Ar 25% He shielding gas
    - Used a frequency of 60 Hz instead of 100 Hz

    I welded up a second test piece without any preheat. I used the same dimensions as the larger ½” x 3” x 5” plate, because it was a larger heat sink. I used the following parameters:

    A/C Current output: 200 amps.
    Balance: 70% Electrode Negative
    Frequency: 60 Hz
    Electrode: 1/8” Tri Mix from Arc Zone.
    Shielding Gas: 75% Argon 25% CO2
    Shielding flow rate: 15 CFH

    The puddle was established quickly and it was easy to weld the plates as shown on the following two pictures:

    15.Test weld-2a
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    16. Test weld-2b
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    It seemed to me that the new blue marked Arc Zone Tri-Mix Tungsten electrodes had a greater tendency to form the small balls on the tip, while welding, compared to the old tan marked Tri-Mix Tungsten electrodes, so I did the following test. I bumped the balance down to 50% EN and I took a square cut electrode of each type and held the electrode 1/8” away from a ½’ thick piece of aluminum and increased the current until the end of the electrode melted. On the left two electrodes, in the following picture, you can see three balls on the end, which were the electrodes with the blue mark. The two on the right formed a single sphere on the end, which were the electrodes with the tan mark. I should note that if I increased the current even more, I could also get multiple balls to form on the end of the tan marked electrodes, but I found when I attempted to form a single sphere all the way across the end of the blue marked electrodes, it always formed multiple balls.

    17. Knobs on electrodes
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    Below you can see the marking on the ends of both electrodes. This confirmed my hypothesis that it was easier to form multiple balls on the end of the blue marked Arc-Zone Tri-Mix electrodes.

    18. Blue and Tan Marks
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    -Don
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport
    Lincoln LE 31 MP & Lincoln 210 MP

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  16. #9
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    Re: Fishing Rod Holder

    Should be able to run 3/32 on 200 amps with that machine. It can use the 3/32 tungsten at a much higher amperage. 260 and it should still have a tiny ball. You want a small ball. Those tungstens look like a transformer on green tungsten

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