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Thread: Blacksmithing and forging

  1. #1026
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    Blacksmithing and forging

    Thanks, Vaughn. I should have realized that if I had thought about it.

    How about a pic of a forged candleholder.


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    Last edited by Lis2323; 11-19-2019 at 03:04 PM.
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  2. #1027
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by ronsii View Post
    Oh shoot!!!! now there probably gonna be a fence around the place making it harder to turn things blue
    No need to bring paint. Iíll leave a pail of whitewash and brushes next to the gate.

    Thanks,
    Tom


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  3. #1028
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    How about a pic of a forged candleholder.
    Sure......



    Of course, it all depends on the size you start with.......

  4. #1029
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    Sure......



    Of course, it all depends on the size you start with.......
    Okay. What diameter is the candle holder in the pic and what size did you start with?


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  5. #1030
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I believe that's a 2.5" candle, so the post end cap would have been something a bit larger than that. I'll have to measure when I get into the shop next, but the important thing isn't the size of the cap but the size of the candle you'll want to put in it.

    There are a ton of folks forging dishes to hold those little 1" tea candles. They start as something like 3x3x1/8 or 3x3x1/4 and get dished or have a depression forged into them to hold the little candles.




  6. #1031
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    I believe that's a 2.5" candle, so the post end cap would have been something a bit larger than that. I'll have to measure when I get into the shop next, but the important thing isn't the size of the cap but the size of the candle you'll want to put in it.

    There are a ton of folks forging dishes to hold those little 1" tea candles. They start as something like 3x3x1/8 or 3x3x1/4 and get dished or have a depression forged into them to hold the little candles.
    Just a guess .... maintaining the symmetry as you hammer it out is the difficult part? Knowing "where" and "how hard" to hit in order to produce a stretch or shrink result somewhere else ... yes? no?

  7. #1032
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley View Post
    .... maintaining the symmetry as you hammer it out is the difficult part? ... yes? no?
    Yes and No are both correct. It's easy to get things wonky with just one errant hammer blow, but if you're careful..... the things pretty much forge themselves because they've already been "taught" where to bend. The key is to flatten the bottom as the last step, over a surface large enough that it supports the whole rim of the dish. If it's wider than your anvil, flatten the bottom on the concrete floor. If the rim is left unsupported in even the smallest area, that area will want to sink down as you hammer the bottom in.

    If you watch John's video on making a skillet, you can see that he forges what is, in essence, a large pipe end cap and then hammers the bottom flat over his anvil, screwing up the unsupported areas and then having to work doubly hard to fix them. 8:46 mark.

    That wouldn't have happened it he had supported the whole rim by using a piece of thick plate on top of the anvil, even moving to his work bench with its metal top.


  8. #1033
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    Yes and No are both correct. It's easy to get things wonky with just one errant hammer blow, but if you're careful..... the things pretty much forge themselves because they've already been "taught" where to bend. The key is to flatten the bottom as the last step, over a surface large enough that it supports the whole rim of the dish. If it's wider than your anvil, flatten the bottom on the concrete floor. If the rim is left unsupported in even the smallest area, that area will want to sink down as you hammer the bottom in.

    If you watch John's video on making a skillet, you can see that he forges what is, in essence, a large pipe end cap and then hammers the bottom flat over his anvil, screwing up the unsupported areas and then having to work doubly hard to fix them. 8:46 mark.

    That wouldn't have happened it he had supported the whole rim by using a piece of thick plate on top of the anvil, even moving to his work bench with its metal top.

    Good to know
    :

  9. #1034
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    Good to know
    Just don't be telling nobody my trade secrets. Took me ages to develop this stuff and I don't share it with just anyone.

  10. #1035
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I'm still thinking you could turn the back yard into a giant chess board and use those parts to make the pieces...
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  11. #1036
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    Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    I'm still thinking you could turn the back yard into a giant chess board and use those parts to make the pieces...
    Iíll save a bunch for you if you want. More wide open spaces at your place than mine.

    Maybe pick Ďem up when youíre out West visiting your sister?

    BTW finally moved them from blocking the big shop door after a week.



    Itís not procrastination if the task isnít urgent, right??


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    Last edited by Lis2323; 11-22-2019 at 12:30 PM.
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  12. #1037
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Don't hold your breath waiting for my visit... I'm the king of procrastination. Just ask my sister, I haven't made it to her last 3 residences. Busy drying grain and breaking things these days...
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  13. #1038
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Not much going on in the shop around here. Sales are in the pits especially considering that it's Christmas. Filling a couple very nice orders that came in....



    I also joined instagram and will be posting there.

    Next up on the list of things to do is make myself a set of monkey tools. Of course, that's after I make the umbrella stand and some Christmas candle holders.

    Fun times!

  14. #1039
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Those hooks look pretty awesome Vaughn!
    :

  15. #1040
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Monkey tools?
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
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  16. #1041
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    Those hooks look pretty awesome Vaughn!
    Thank you. The Ultra Jig makes it pretty easy as long as you do your part. Of course, getting the tapers and curls as close as you can makes a huge difference in how they come out in the end. That's the real aggravation I'd love to find a solution to!

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Monkey tools?
    Monkey tools are the little gadgets you use to size a round tenon, squaring up the shoulder of the parent stock. It's basically just a short 6" bar with a hole drilled 2" deep down the center, and a cross hole at the end of it for clearing scale. Very handy to have, but I like using hex stock for them and don't have any in the right size.

    These are on ebay right now, in a nice 1045 alloy, but I'm not paying $45 for the things.



    One of the things smiths often forget is to make the hole one hair size larger than you want the tenon to be. Steel shrinks as it cools, so if you forge your tenon to a hot 1/4", it won't be 1/4" once it's cooled down and you've scrubbed the scale off it.

  17. #1042
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Interesting... I've never seen those before.
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
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  18. #1043
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Not many folks use them, to be honest. With welding being so popular, tenons have kind of gone out of fashion.

    I'm just as guilty as anyone in that regard, hence why I want to get back to doing tenons and rivets rather than relying on welding for a lot of projects.

  19. #1044
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging



    Merry Christmas ya'll!
    City of L.A. Structural; Manual & Semi-Automatic;
    "Surely there is a mine for silver, and a place where gold is refined. Iron is taken from the earth, and copper is smelted from ore."
    Job 28:1,2

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    Danny

  20. #1045
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    Thank you. The Ultra Jig makes it pretty easy as long as you do your part. Of course, getting the tapers and curls as close as you can makes a huge difference in how they come out in the end. That's the real aggravation I'd love to find a solution to!



    Monkey tools are the little gadgets you use to size a round tenon, squaring up the shoulder of the parent stock. It's basically just a short 6" bar with a hole drilled 2" deep down the center, and a cross hole at the end of it for clearing scale. Very handy to have, but I like using hex stock for them and don't have any in the right size.

    These are on ebay right now, in a nice 1045 alloy, but I'm not paying $45 for the things.



    One of the things smiths often forget is to make the hole one hair size larger than you want the tenon to be. Steel shrinks as it cools, so if you forge your tenon to a hot 1/4", it won't be 1/4" once it's cooled down and you've scrubbed the scale off it.
    If you wanted the holes slightly bigger, that might be a time when metric drill sizes could come in handy... or just a little extra grinding with the die grinder and straight drum.

    Merry Xmas to you as well Tanglediver
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
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    Les

  21. #1046
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Or, check into numbered drill bit sizes.

  22. #1047
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Hmmm.... good point.... found this downloadable chart.

    https://www.custompartnet.com/drill-size-chart
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
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  23. #1048
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by tanglediver View Post


    Merry Christmas ya'll!
    I got a good laugh out of that. Reminds me of some of the old Wiley Coyote cartoons.
    Lincoln, ESAB, Thermal Dynamics, Victor, Miller, Dewalt, Makita, Kalamzoo. Hand tools, power tools, welding and cutting tools.

  24. #1049
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Forged up another Dog Tag flint striker from 1095. Love the pebbled texture, but sure wish I could understand what's going on in the steel. I should do this again just so I can do a cross-sectional analysis to see if those are air-filled bubbles.

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  25. #1050
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    You could weigh it precisely then do a displacement test and calc up the volume to get theoretical weight... I don't think air bubbles...

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