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Thread: Welding Table

  1. #1
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    Welding Table

    Finally getting around to building a table for my shop. Interested in your thoughts please.

    Top frame and legs 2"x3"x1/4" square tube with levelling castor/ feet combo.
    Six slats, 6"x5/8" x one metre long 25mm spacing between.
    16mm holes in slats on 50mm grid.

    Do you think it ok to weld slats down or drill and tap for countersunk scews?

    I can't find a half sheet of plate and not willing to bone up for a whole sheet, hence the slats.

    Suggestions for keeping the slat surface bright and free of rust and oils.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Re: Welding Table

    There have been a few table made with slates, only thing I see is if to much heat is put into the welding of the slates may cause warping.
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  3. #3
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    Welding Table

    May as well do it right.

    Drill and tap. Use countersunk Allen head bolts.
    Last edited by Lis2323; 01-17-2020 at 01:32 PM.
    :

  4. #4
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    Re: Welding Table

    These are welded leveling bolts to 1/2” slats...
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  5. #5
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    Re: Welding Table

    Most Welding table I seen have been welded. That how I built my table.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Woznme View Post
    Finally getting around to building a table for my shop. Interested in your thoughts please.

    Top frame and legs 2"x3"x1/4" square tube with levelling castor/ feet combo.
    Six slats, 6"x5/8" x one metre long 25mm spacing between.
    16mm holes in slats on 50mm grid.

    Do you think it ok to weld slats down or drill and tap for countersunk scews?

    I can't find a half sheet of plate and not willing to bone up for a whole sheet, hence the slats.

    Suggestions for keeping the slat surface bright and free of rust and oils.

    Thanks.
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  6. #6
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    Re: Welding Table

    Thanks all. I think I will drill, tap and countersink. Avoid the risk if warping.
    Square tube is pretty straight so three runners should keep the slats flat without the need for adjusters I'm hoping.

  7. #7
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    Re: Welding Table

    You can always shim if you need to.
    :

  8. #8
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    Re: Welding Table

    Don't go crazy with the welds and you shouldn't have any real problem with warping at that thickness - preheat the plates and clean area well if welding something small (nut, etc) to them, to ensure proper fusion to the thicker plate.

    Drilling/tapping is always a good idea but not always practical (especially at that thickness). Learn to sharpen drill bits either way, will save you so much time/money in the long run and is not hard to do (use any power sander clamped down if you don't have bench sander/grinders).

    I'd weld one, see what kind of effect it has warpage wise and decide from there.

  9. #9
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    Re: Welding Table

    Steel arrived today. The 6 x 5/8 flat bar has slight kinks in it where the steel yard lifted the bar on fork lift tynes.
    Now I have to work out how to straighten it.

  10. #10
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    Re: Welding Table

    Quote Originally Posted by Woznme View Post
    Thanks all. I think I will drill, tap and countersink. Avoid the risk if warping.
    Square tube is pretty straight so three runners should keep the slats flat without the need for adjusters I'm hoping.
    Maybe consider tacking nuts on instead of drilling and tapping

  11. #11
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    Re: Welding Table

    May be an unpopular opinion but if you're not using your table for something with an insane amount of precision, the warpage that occurs on the materials you're using is overstated. I have a very similar setup as you do, and I welded the slats to the top of the frame directly. There was 0 warpage. There is no deviation in the top across the plane. I haven't ran across a project yet that this has given me problems with.

    I started down the path you're going with the bolts and whatnot, but it was way more labor intensive and at this point the work would have been overkill for anything I'd ever need it for.

    If you're using the table where a 10th of a mm makes a difference, it may be worth it. If you're hobby welding, weld it straight to the top and be done with it.

    Also, I really enjoy the slat topper. It comes in handy being able to clamp your work down in any position you want. I also do a lot of wood work and use the welding table for that. Probably one of the best tools in the garage is that table.

  12. #12
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    Re: Welding Table

    Not a home gamer. My home is for beer, bbq and rest.
    My work is certificated pipework, mostly on site. I use my shop for fabbing up control valve stations. Effort is made to keep these headers straight and square. Also plenty of odd jobs and repairs.
    I see time savings with a decent table with a clamping hole pattern. Doesn't have to be big. A tenth of a millimetre is meaningless to me but I do like to build things right.
    Gone decades without one but making the effort now, you know - work smarter not harder.
    Not looking forward to the drilling, countersinking and tapping. I would rather weld if it works hence my request for info. Thanks for your input, it's reassuring.
    I have time to decide, I must straighten the flat bar first.

  13. #13
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    Re: Welding Table

    Quote Originally Posted by Woznme View Post
    Not a home gamer. My home is for beer, bbq and rest.
    My work is certificated pipework, mostly on site. I use my shop for fabbing up control valve stations. Effort is made to keep these headers straight and square. Also plenty of odd jobs and repairs.
    I see time savings with a decent table with a clamping hole pattern. Doesn't have to be big. A tenth of a millimetre is meaningless to me but I do like to build things right.
    Gone decades without one but making the effort now, you know - work smarter not harder.
    Not looking forward to the drilling, countersinking and tapping. I would rather weld if it works hence my request for info. Thanks for your input, it's reassuring.
    I have time to decide, I must straighten the flat bar first.
    Alright with that information my $.02 is welding it directly to the frame will save you a lot of time, drill bits and hardware. The bolt method you're going will get you a very marginally flatter surface for a lot more time. Worst case scenario, put the welds where you can hit them with a angle grinder to remove and add the bolts later if it becomes an issue. It won't become an issue if you get it flat the first time around.

    When you go to weld the slats to the frame, place the slats on the frame without welding, and lay your flat stock across the surface. That way you can see which ones might be high and which ones are low. Shim them up to where they need to be and hit them with a weld.

  14. #14
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    Re: Welding Table

    Quote Originally Posted by iwreckalot View Post
    Alright with that information my $.02 is welding it directly to the frame will save you a lot of time, drill bits and hardware. The bolt method you're going will get you a very marginally flatter surface for a lot more time. Worst case scenario, put the welds where you can hit them with a angle grinder to remove and add the bolts later if it becomes an issue. It won't become an issue if you get it flat the first time around.

    When you go to weld the slats to the frame, place the slats on the frame without welding, and lay your flat stock across the surface. That way you can see which ones might be high and which ones are low. Shim them up to where they need to be and hit them with a weld.
    Thatís a good option. Thatís what I did with a solid top. Tack and shim.

    :

  15. #15
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    Re: Welding Table

    This is a fit up/layout table...

    1/2” plate on top...tacked. I took my time, clamped the hell outa it on my frame build which was very close to flat. By the time I got done carefully tacking, shimming, clamping etc...it came out almost dead flat...very happy with it. It gets used for cabinet work...and fitting together metal work...


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  16. #16
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    Re: Welding Table

    Nice tables, thanks for posting. Did you remove mill scale? if so how and do you treat the surface for rust?
    Levelling castors arrived today, rated 500kg each. They're Chinese but the price was good, right? Construction appears solid and with thrust bearing.
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  17. #17
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    Re: Welding Table

    I welded.

    No warpage. Short beads of 7018; as it's not a structural weld - it's only affixing the slats to the frame. Going to make a few revisions; overall - very pleased with the outcome.

    Do you really know all of the work that goes into getting that fish onto your plate?

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