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Thread: 6010!

  1. #26
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelvin View Post
    Maybe you should try it once before commenting on how worthless it is...? Just a thought.

    FWIW, I know of no rod that gives deeper penetration...if you're into that kind of thing. Ya know, for deep roots and stuff. It's also great for filling big holes.

    And yes, there are plenty of times when you need to bodge something together from rusted, greasy or painted material -- temporary jigs, holding fixtures, whatever -- where grinding to shiny metal would just be a waste of time. And sometimes (field repairs of equipment for example) you can't get in with a grinder to prepare a cleanroom-ready surface for welding. Just sayin
    Equipment repair is a real example of where 6010 (& 6011 on AC) works good - 300 horse tractor & a big rock, plow broke. It has been setting out for years & the old paint & rust has taken hold. Break out the rosebud heat it & beat it back close, fire up the 6010 & lay a stringer root - filling gaps as needed. Hit it with a grinder & wire brush & you have a clean joint prepped to finish out with 7018. All the crud was burned off by the 6010. Use for 1st pass on galvanized steel also after it is ground clean - the zinc has a tendency to smear when you grind it - quick pass with 6010 cleans it up - a quick grind & brush job & you are ready for 7018.

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  3. #27
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by mla2ofus View Post
    Gee, how did all us old welders get by without all the bells and whistles??
    Same way people had to use carriages to ride around before motor-vehicles & airplanes: they had to accept the compromise and lack of advantages. Plenty of us use motor vehicles, so we can easily see how the advantages are not so un-wanted.
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  4. #28
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    Re: 6010!

    If the subject is 6010, I don't think there has ever been a machine that is more preferred for 6010 than an SA200 and best ones are the older ones. Actually any of the Lincoln generators are the cat's meow for 6010.

  5. #29
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by axehind View Post
    ha!
    Hey before electricity they used O/A. I've done some O/A welding and I do like it. Though from memory, doing a fillet with O/A could be challenging.
    Electric welding came before O/A welding.

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  7. #30
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    Re: 6010!

    I never would have read through this thread if I hadn't seen the sale on welding rod at Fleet Farm. I did not have any 6010 so I bought a 5 lb box for sh1tz and giggles. Why is 6010 almost double the price of the other rods?

    And then I see this thread and the conversation about settings, which made me look at my old Lincoln 300 TIG (it's way more machine than I deserve). It has a toggle switch labeled "soft start". Another toggle switch labeled "spark switch" and a knob labeled "spark intensity" I assume it's just different terminology for the stuff discussed above. Now I gotta get out the manual and read up on those again and play with different settings.
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  8. #31
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by bead-boy View Post
    I never would have read through this thread if I hadn't seen the sale on welding rod at Fleet Farm. I did not have any 6010 so I bought a 5 lb box for sh1tz and giggles. Why is 6010 almost double the price of the other rods?

    And then I see this thread and the conversation about settings, which made me look at my old Lincoln 300 TIG (it's way more machine than I deserve). It has a toggle switch labeled "soft start". Another toggle switch labeled "spark switch" and a knob labeled "spark intensity" I assume it's just different terminology for the stuff discussed above. Now I gotta get out the manual and read up on those again and play with different settings.
    you assume wrong... Spark adjustment is for HF start options, and soft start is for current... again for TIG. Nothing to do with stick welding.

  9. #32
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    Re: 6010!

    Well it takes more than a 5lb box of rod to become proficient with 6010 lots of times to long of arc causes a lot of your spatter problems also your amperage might be a little high also travel speed and the whipping motion donít try to drag it like LH
    You guys talk about red rod just 5P and 5P+ go back some more when it was white and it was just straight old 5

  10. #33
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    Re: 6010!

    I weld a lot of sheet metal with 1/8 6010 5P+
    Itís my sheet metal smaw electrode of choice.
    Your invertec v275 will run it very well. Itís a totally different animal than 7018.
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  11. #34
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    Re: 6010!

    The old red 6010 was tough to run. It was a digging fool to be sure I actually enjoy 5P+, it is much more controllable


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  12. #35
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by snoeproe View Post
    I weld a lot of sheet metal with 1/8 6010 5P+
    Itís my sheet metal smaw electrode of choice.
    1/8 6010 on sheet metal? How?

  13. #36
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    Re: 6010!

    1/8Ē or 12g hot rolled sheet welds great with a 1/8Ē 6010 electrode.
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  14. #37
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    Re: 6010!

    6010 and 6011 will a regular welding machine with just 1 amp knob works good, weld might appear rougher if used to 7018 or 6013
    .
    dont need arc force or hot start adjustment. if gap filling they can actually make things more difficult. cause it is quick freeze often people use a whip either a short to long to short arc length or moving forward and back in direction of travel (with normal arc length) to fill gaps. if machine has arc force knob way too high it might say 90 amps but you might be getting 120 amps with a short arc length. many beginners better off turning arc force and hot start off or way down. many regular welding machines dont even have those extra knobs and they work just fine without
    .
    many use a welding amp chart to save time
    if fillet welding 1/4" thick on a bench 1/8 rod 6010/6011 usually start with 115 amps or use 5/32 rod at 135 amps
    .
    if welding 1/8 thick fillet weld vertical down might use 1/8 rod at 100 amps or start with that. point is amp chart is to save time and start welding using rod size and amps close to needed and not waste time figuring it out every time. different machines the amp knob might be off calibration. standard test is if 1/8 6010 rated for 70 - 130 amps +/- if at 135 amps if burning 1/8 rod in one use down to 2" if stop look at flux covering rod is it on fire or brown and smoking from over heating full length of rod remaining. its same with 7018 if stop welding and flux covering is red hot the amps are too high
    .
    thats often difference in beginners and professionals the beginner picks rod and amps and spends considerable time practice welding and adjusting til it looks good enough. professional going to start off with settings that work good and if at most need only a small adjust. many make a chart for there particular machine as many the amp knob is off calibration often 10 or more amps
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  15. #38
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by Munkul View Post
    soft start is for current... again for TIG. Nothing to do with stick welding.
    You can also use it for stick. I use the soft start feature on my 330A/BP all the time, particularly on thin material...it lets you get the arc lit so you can see what's going on before it ramps up (and blows holes)

  16. #39
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by Welder Dave View Post
    6010 generally runs the same as amps as the size smaller of 7018. A general setting for 1/8" 6010 would be around 90 amps, the same as 3/32" 7018. You're in the ball park and the whip and pause technique is the most common when burning 6010. A nice thing about 6010 is it can make sound welds with some strength going downhand. Downhand is not recommended for other rods.
    For the sake of the old-timers who are thinking it but have learned to keep their mouths shut for the sake of peace:
    Downhand welding is not the same thing as downhill welding.
    ...
    Flat Position (1G Or 1F)

    This type of welding is performed from the upper side of the joint. The face of the weld is approximately horizontal.

    Flat welding is the preferred term; however, the same position is sometimes called downhand.

    Note: The axis of a weld is a line through the length of the weld, perpendicular to the cross section at its center of gravity.

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  17. #40
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    Re: 6010!

    Going by the pipeline term which is generally referred to as downhand which is slightly downhill to full down hill to overhead. I don't what angle downhand becomes downhill. Vertical up is often referred to as uphand. One of those things where sometimes terms are interchanged. Not much different than people insisting 7018 has to be kept in an oven.

  18. #41
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    Re: 6010!

    language translation or what words or terms used in different countries I wouldnt get overly concerned with.
    .
    I got invited to a Sea Container ship launching once. 7 story tall ship holding 1024 sea containers going into the water that day. They used to invite Americans cause they were proud but also most would see massive shipyard approximately 10 to 100 bigger than most Americans were used too and it would burst their pride bubble and they would come away feeling like small potatoes.
    .
    When dealing with other people what they call stuff doesnt mean that much. Alot of Americans didnt think much going on in the Chinese cities. But it meant you had to look for stuff. Most bigger cities were massive, hard to describe. If you questioned the Chinese workers I am sure they would not use all the proper English words and terms for stuff. I found most knew what they were doing and quite skilled at it even if they were not using terms and words that a American would be familiar with
    .
    many Chinese buildings had ground floor shops with a garage type door. they open door and you could see stuff being made. alot of welding done for example stainless window bars tig welded what i saw they were very skilled at it. most workers I am sure didnt use proper words and terms for stuff that a American would understand.
    .
    you ought to try to use machine shop tools and welding equipment where everything labeled in Chinese and the operator manuals explaining stuff all in Chinese. I went to a old abandoned Chinese industrial library where they had 1000's of books in many languages. 95% of books totally couldnt read the language same as I cannot read and write Chinese at all. I am illiterate in every language except English and even English I dont claim to be a English teacher
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  19. #42
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    Re: 6010!

    same with terms for metal. A chart showing what different countries call the same steel, it was same with welding rod. American terms not always understood by most of the rest of the world.
    .
    translation is not easy. even 2 workers might call same thing by different words. many welders wouldnt understand what 6010 meant even if they used that rod before. its not called that in other countries
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  20. #43
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelvin View Post
    Maybe you should try it once before commenting on how worthless it is...? Just a thought.

    FWIW, I know of no rod that gives deeper penetration...if you're into that kind of thing. Ya know, for deep roots and stuff. It's also great for filling big holes.

    And yes, there are plenty of times when you need to bodge something together from rusted, greasy or painted material -- temporary jigs, holding fixtures, whatever -- where grinding to shiny metal would just be a waste of time. And sometimes (field repairs of equipment for example) you can't get in with a grinder to prepare a cleanroom-ready surface for welding. Just sayin
    yup, it aint always nice and clean...to be honest most of the time it isnt. go into a coal breaker sometime on a saturday when they usually do the maintenance. they give you a list of what needs to be repaired. you go out to the yard and find some scrap metal to work with. most of it has been out in weather for years. take it upstairs ad cut out your pieces and the junk they want you to fix. the stuff your gonna weld that piece of scrap to is full of sulfur from the coal. sometimes you can burn most of it out with a torch sometimes not. the scrap your using to fix it is full of sulfur too most of the time. most coal breakers use those old tombstone ac welders. if you are lucky you might know what for rods you gonna use. most breakermen want you to use the rods they got settin on the old coal stove. they got em for nothin somewhere so they got em and they dont wanna pay you for yours. you might have some 7018 some 6010 6011 6013 some jetrod maybe some manganese all in one handful. most of the time you cant tell without studying each rod but there aint time for all that...so you go with what you got in your hands and you make it work. it might look pretty when your done if your good and it might not even if your good. as long as it stays together and dont leak til they shut down for a week or 2 to replace it altogether the right way.

    these old breakermen will tell you anyone can weld with good stuff thats nice and shiny and clean and using rods stored in a can in the dry or an oven using a machine with all the bells and whistle. it takes a real welder to weld this stuff with this stuff. and never ever let anyone tell you you cant weld 6010 with an ac machine or that the machine wont run a certain rod, ive done it many times and made it work and it looked pretty dam good.

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  22. #44
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by mla2ofus View Post
    Gee, how did all us old welders get by without all the bells and whistles??
    We knew what we were doin and made it work

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  24. #45
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by tapwelder View Post
    Electric welding came before O/A welding.
    Not for pipeline work. Cross country line near here installed back in '32. 40' joints OA welded, using acetylene generators. Then the 80' joints were Dresser coupled.

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  26. #46
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    Re: 6010!

    Electric welding was developed first. O/A followed closely and quickly became more popular and useful for field work.

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  27. #47
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    Re: 6010!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelvin View Post
    You can also use it for stick. I use the soft start feature on my 330A/BP all the time, particularly on thin material...it lets you get the arc lit so you can see what's going on before it ramps up (and blows holes)
    Fair enough. Most people go the opposite way if anything and use a hot start feature... usually set around 120% main current for stick welding. Usually built in to MMA inverters by default these days.

  28. #48
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    Re: 6010!

    I gotta say that working with the cellulose electrodes gave me a much more solid understanding of how a puddle works and the mechanics of how it forms the finished weld than any amount of reading and using other methods did.

  29. #49
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    Re: 6010!

    Oxy/acetylene welding is the best for learning about the puddle but is almost a lost art now. A lot people who don't know better think 6010/6011 isn't as good a weld because it has a rougher appearance and more spatter. It generally uses a different technique than other stick rods.

  30. #50
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    Re: 6010!

    I love me some 5p+ 6010 . I honestly prefer it over 7018 . Unless 7018 is required. Plus I like inspecting other peoples 6010 beads . You can judge someone's stick welding skill by looking at their 6010 welds .

    I love dimes

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