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Thread: Changing regulators

  1. #1
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    Changing regulators

    Hi, I am new to welding. l recently got an oxyacetylene setup at a yard sale but the regulators are not the same size. l think the acetylene is heavy duty and the oxygen is medium duty. Also the inlet tube is bent on the acetylene regulator like it took a pretty good hit. They’re both very old and I was thinking of replacing them both with medium duty if that will work. The torch is a heavy duty Victor 315; would there be a problem putting medium duty regulators to it?

  2. #2
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    Re: Changing regulators

    The only issue I can think of is if your using a really large tip, and even then the limiting factor is usually acetylene withdrawal rate.

  3. #3
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Shouldn't be a problem at all but you can likely use the regulators you have. You can replace the inlet on the acet. if need be. Regulators are mixed and matched all the time. Can you post pics of the regulators?

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    Re: Changing regulators

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    Thank you for the replies - Here are some pictures. They are both pre 1960 victors. The acet is a sr 410 (that is the one with the bend) and the oxy is a sr 200.

  5. #5
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Those are almost collector items. Might be worth taking them to a repair shop and see what they say.

  6. #6
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Rio View Post
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    Thank you for the replies - Here are some pictures. They are both pre 1960 victors. The acet is a sr 410 (that is the one with the bend) and the oxy is a sr 200.
    That inlet tube on your acetylene regulator can be replaced, your weld supply folks should have one available or can get you one, but as long as it dont leak you are fine. Hook em up check em out make sure you got no leaks and that your gauges read pretty accurate and that your adjustment works as it should and then start cuttin or weldin whatever you are goin to do with it.

    Have fun learn lots and be safe

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  8. #7
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye an old miner View Post
    Hook em up check em out make sure you got no leaks and that your gauges read pretty accurate and that your adjustment works as it should and then start cuttin or weldin whatever you are goin to do with it.
    The thing is I don’t know what happened to bend that inlet. Do you think it could be possible that the impact that bent the inlet might have caused invisible internal damage that could lead to an explosion when I go to try it?

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    Re: Changing regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Rio View Post
    The thing is I don’t know what happened to bend that inlet. Do you think it could be possible that the impact that bent the inlet might have caused invisible internal damage that could lead to an explosion when I go to try it?
    Like Popeye said.............hook it up, and see if it works. Just keep away from the front of the regulator. If things are really bad inside the regulator, the face might blow out. Otherwise, I'd say it's all good if the diaphragm doesn't leak.

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  11. #9
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    Re: Changing regulators

    When first testing a regulator with tank pressure take the hose off. Back of the regulator handle until just starting to do something going back in with it. If it is passing tank pressure the excess can escape out the low side and discharge in time for you to close it tank back up. If all goes well turn the handle in a little until gas just escapes then back off again. Check that it is not leaking.
    New hoses for sure. Cheap insurance.

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  13. #10
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Hey guys I hooked up the regulators and the gauges seem to be pretty accurate. They both leak a little: the acetylene from the inlet to tank connection and the oxy from the back of the regulator through a o-ring. A new o-ring and inlet should fix it I will get them the next time I go to town

  14. #11
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    Re: Changing regulators

    I Went to airgas and got the inlet tube for the acetylene and it fixed the leak. But they didn’t have the o-ring for the oxy. I don’t think it’s a very big leak. l closed the tank and the regulator so the pressure was trapped in the high pressure side of the regulator at 2100 psi; it lost about 200 psi in an hour and a half, and twelve hours later it was at 700. It will take at least a week to order the o-ring on line. Do you think I can use the torch in the meantime?

  15. #12
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Rio View Post
    I Went to airgas and got the inlet tube for the acetylene and it fixed the leak. But they didn’t have the o-ring for the oxy. I don’t think it’s a very big leak. l closed the tank and the regulator so the pressure was trapped in the high pressure side of the regulator at 2100 psi; it lost about 200 psi in an hour and a half, and twelve hours later it was at 700. It will take at least a week to order the o-ring on line. Do you think I can use the torch in the meantime?
    I wouldn't worry about it. Most hoses probably leak that much over time.

  16. #13
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by Rio View Post
    I Went to airgas and got the inlet tube for the acetylene and it fixed the leak. But they didn’t have the o-ring for the oxy. I don’t think it’s a very big leak. l closed the tank and the regulator so the pressure was trapped in the high pressure side of the regulator at 2100 psi; it lost about 200 psi in an hour and a half, and twelve hours later it was at 700. It will take at least a week to order the o-ring on line. Do you think I can use the torch in the meantime?
    yes you can use it, just shut the bottles off when you are done, the oxygen wont burn without fuel there, so you shoukd be ok, if it would be the acetylene leakin that wouldnt be a good thing

  17. #14
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    Re: Changing regulators

    Regulators aren't like cylinder valves and will eventually leak down when the cylinder valve is closed. That's hardly any leakage and since weldors who want to live ALWAYS shut off their cylinders when not using the torch I'd have no problem running it so long as there are no detectable external leaks (Ivory Soap and water was the old recommended leak check by Oxweld/Purox before commercial leak check juice). The design is such that the inlet nipple can bend or snap off (which protects the cylinder valve from damage) and the guts will be fine as they're safely armored in heavy brass.

    All my (many, I ran into a lifetime supply at auction) Victor regs and flowmeters of various types are rebuilds (mostly by me unless an oxygen reg was nastier than I felt like cleaning) and they're basically immortal. You can still get rebuild kits for both your regulators online or have them done which I would do in preference to new since a rebuilt reg is effectively new.

    I have 1920s and '30s US-made torches whose original seals are fine (and passed nitrogen pressure tests well above factory spec which I did for giggles). The Victor 315 is an excellent torch and should live longer than the owner. I'd rather have old torches and regs than new ones.

    The only hazard is collecting is addictive.

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