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Thread: Old school automated torch

  1. #1
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    Old school automated torch

    All the rage today is about CAD and automated this or that. I can appreciate how nice it must be to be able to draw something in your computer and have it cut out on a water jet or laser machine, but I'm just too computer illiterate to get past that "computer" part. I like drawing on paper. Pencils don't have their hard drives crash or get finicky because the shop dust got in them!

    Imagine my surprise when I saw this gadget on one of my favorite blacksmithing Youtube channels! Small footprint, easy to understand, and it follows the lines drawn on a sheet of paper! No idea how it's doing what it's doing, but it looks like it's built well and would last a long time. For a small operation like mine, one of these would be pretty fun to have in the shop!



    Anyone ever use one? Were they common in the US?

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  3. #2
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    Re: Old school automated torch

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    All the rage today is about CAD and automated this or that. I can appreciate how nice it must be to be able to draw something in your computer and have it cut out on a water jet or laser machine, but I'm just too computer illiterate to get past that "computer" part. I like drawing on paper. Pencils don't have their hard drives crash or get finicky because the shop dust got in them!

    Imagine my surprise when I saw this gadget on one of my favorite blacksmithing Youtube channels! Small footprint, easy to understand, and it follows the lines drawn on a sheet of paper! No idea how it's doing what it's doing, but it looks like it's built well and would last a long time. For a small operation like mine, one of these would be pretty fun to have in the shop!



    Anyone ever use one? Were they common in the US?
    ESAB sold one that did the same thing. Much less cost and pretty simple to run. Worked ok until a fly landed on the paper. Sillouette 500 or something like that. they also had one that had a knurled wheel that rode on your part while cutting another. Pantagraph or something like that? Both worked with plasma or ovyfuel
    Thermal Arc 320SP ( Lorch )
    Cobra Pythons
    Thermal Arc 300 AC/DC ( Sanrex )
    ESAB 301i AC/DC ( Lorch )
    Thermal Arc 161STL ( WTL )
    Thermal Arc 190S ( Sanrex )
    Cut Master 82, 42. Cut45 ( WTL )
    Victor Gas Apps.
    Boxes and boxes of welding crap.

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  5. #3
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    Re: Old school automated torch

    There are electric eye pattern cutters that follow a drawing. An Esab Silhouette 500 is this type of machine. The magnetic pattern machines are like this Airco Camograph. Victor, Koike and others also had versions of them.

    https://hanwayauctioneers.hibid.com/...rco-camograph/

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  7. #4
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    Re: Old school automated torch

    That Esab 500 looks a whole lot more complicated, never mind taking up a bunch more room. I could see it being nice to cut larger pieces, though.

  8. #5
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    Re: Old school automated torch

    SheetCam has software called "Scannything" that used a small camera mounted on a Plasma CNC table connected to the computer running their software to trace line drawing and produce a G-code for CNC plasma cutting. I think there are others too.
    DIY CNC Plasma table USB BOB Price THC
    Hypertherm 65
    Everlast PowerTig 255 EXT
    Miler 180 Mig
    13" metal lathe
    Mill/ Drill
    ECT, ECT,

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  10. #6
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    Re: Old school automated torch

    I have a machine like that in my shop. Mine is a C&G, which I bought new in about 1991. I have cut literally tens of thousands of parts with it. Never had an issue with a fly...


    At the time I bought it, adding a computer to control it would have cost an additional ten grand, and then five grand for the software, and by now, 30 years later, I am kinda used to it. For onsies or twosies, its much faster to draw than to dick around with the computer anyway.

    Mine is 4 x 8, and has access to forklift a 4x8 plate onto, particularly if its 1/4" or thicker.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Ries; 1 Week Ago at 03:55 PM.

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  12. #7
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    Re: Old school automated torch

    Lowbuck tools used to sale parts to convert a pantograph into an automated pattern traced. Similar to what Rondo mentioned. I don't see Lowbuck's site anymore, though products are still being sold.

  13. #8
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    Re: Old school automated torch

    The electric eye type
    They came marked in 1940's I look lately to still make new but did 1990's

    It uses paper draw and eye follows the line on paper drawing.

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...20&vt=4&sim=11

    They make 1 torch and up
    The I own had 5 torches and could cut 5' x 10' part and I cut up to 6" plate.
    The one photo is small 24" x 24" they to work great but great for small shops

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    All the rage today is about CAD and automated this or that. I can appreciate how nice it must be to be able to draw something in your computer and have it cut out on a water jet or laser machine, but I'm just too computer illiterate to get past that "computer" part. I like drawing on paper. Pencils don't have their hard drives crash or get finicky because the shop dust got in them!

    Imagine my surprise when I saw this gadget on one of my favorite blacksmithing Youtube channels! Small footprint, easy to understand, and it follows the lines drawn on a sheet of paper! No idea how it's doing what it's doing, but it looks like it's built well and would last a long time. For a small operation like mine, one of these would be pretty fun to have in the shop!



    Anyone ever use one? Were they common in the US?
    Last edited by smithdoor; 1 Week Ago at 07:36 PM.

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