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Thread: Rolling oil drain pan for home shop mechanic's pit

  1. #51
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    Apr 2008
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    Re: Rolling oil drain pan for home shop mechanic's pit

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarmstrong View Post
    how are planning to vent that area? Pits will trap dangerous gases if left with circulation...
    There is a 500 CFM fan that pulls air from the bottom of the pit. State law requires 66 CFM based on the volume of the pit.

    There is more discussion of this on the Practical Machinist thread I linked too.

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  3. #52
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    Mar 2011
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    Re: Rolling oil drain pan for home shop mechanic's pit

    Quote Originally Posted by kb0thn View Post
    The concrete contractor did not finish the floor to the pit rim as it should have been. Very unhappy about that. Pit rim was dead level. But the concrete is 3/8" above the rim in some places and 1/8" below in other. Pretty pissed off about it. All it would have taken is to run the screed to the rim. But they didn't. And I get to look at it for the rest of my life. I hate concrete guys. But even seeing the defects, he declares the concrete is "perfect". But whatever, it's literally set in concrete. Nothing I can reasonably do about it at this point.
    Attachment 1719935

    I used the last of the really warm weather to paint it. I hate painting. Prep work takes forever.
    Attachment 1719936

    Rolled on Rust-Oleum oil based safety yellow. Did a couple of coats and then weather got cold. Will see how it looks next summer. I should have made the rim out of stainless.
    Attachment 1719937
    I use the rustoleum safety yellow for most all of the bollards and safety railing we do, it's ok paint for how much it costs... the sun will fade it and it's not real hard but is pretty tough although it doesn't handle forklift scrapes too well
    Name:  seatac-usps-bldg7-pic45.jpg
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Size:  74.2 KB

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  5. #53
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    Oct 2013
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    Ohio
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    Re: Rolling oil drain pan for home shop mechanic's pit

    Very nice ! Too bad about the concrete job...can't believe he didnt make it right....

  6. #54
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    Nov 2009
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    Seward, Ak
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    Re: Rolling oil drain pan for home shop mechanic's pit

    You would think that the mud guy would have screeded it away from the rim. Any floor drains? Drains would require sloping the finish towards drains. maybe not doable by this guy.

    Quote Originally Posted by kb0thn View Post
    It was a lot of work. Not really done with it yet. Still need to make covers and get the utilities in there and figure out lights.

    Looks like the start of excavation was September 13th. Looks like the paint photo was from November 10th. I'd guess 100 to 200 hours in there. And I bet it will be $15k by the time I finish with removeable covers for it. On the Practical Machinist thread someone asked about cost and I broke it down in there.

  7. #55
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    Re: Rolling oil drain pan for home shop mechanic's pit

    Quote Originally Posted by akpolaris View Post
    You would think that the mud guy would have screeded it away from the rim. Any floor drains? Drains would require sloping the finish towards drains. maybe not doable by this guy.
    No floor drains on this slab. The floor was supposed to flat and level to within 1/8". This building is for working on stuff and as such I wanted big flat floors to work on. Squeegeeing out some melted snow on occasion is the tradeoff. The building as at the top of a hill, so the only water that comes in is what I bring in.

    I have another building on the farm where stuff is parked and stored. It has 2ft+ of slope over 70ft of length. The "floor" drains are actually in the downhill walls. We just did concrete on that building this summer as well. It actually seems to be working well for storing leaking vehicles on. Everything goes downhill fast.

    But I have other shops where there are floor drains and it just makes the type of work I do a pain in the ***. I hate having to use plywood for shims while welding big things on the floor. I rent another building at work where I have a 16ft wide bay with a drain in the middle of it. 2" of slope in that 16ft. Probably good for washing a car in, but damn there are a lot of shims under the racks and saws and conveyors in there.

    What I see with the drains is that the concrete guys use them as excuses to make ****ty concrete. Put enough slope on it and they can eyeball the concrete in. As far as I can tell, they really don't know how to use anything longer than a hand level in general.

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