Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: High School Senior Getting Into Welding

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    High School Senior Getting Into Welding

    Hey guys, hows it going tonight? With High School coming to an end- it is time for me to start thinking about what I want to do with my life, going to a University is not one of them. So Ive decided I want to give welding a try. I have statue like steady hands. There is this local community college that has welding classes- I know they teach TIG and MIG, I am going to go there. I live in North Carolina by the way, I heard where you live plays a big role in employment oppurtunities. But my main questions are: Is becoming a welder for a living in today's world a good idea? How likely am I to get employed? Whats life like for a welder at work? Thanks .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    8,225
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: High School Senior Getting Into Welding

    Welcome to the forum.

    Can't offer any advice since I'm just a hobby welder but just like anything you get out of it what you put in.

    Good luck to ya
    Ed Conley
    http://www.screamingbroccoli.com/
    MM252
    MM211 (Sold)
    Passport Plus & Spool gun
    Lincoln SP135 Plus- (Gone to a good home)
    Klutch 120v Plasma cutter
    SO 2020 bender
    Beer in the fridge

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    N . GA
    Posts
    81
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: High School Senior Getting Into Welding

    it all depends . nothing wrong with learning a skill , but being stuck with only that skill can be very
    limiting to the jobs you can get . weldors' jobs come in many forms - from $8.00/hr jobs where any
    monkey who can point a mig gun is fine - to critical boiler and pipeline work to underwater work to
    welding engineers . if the thought of 10 hr days production welding fence panels or patio furniture doesn't appeal
    to you...... maybe keep your options open . welding for hours on end is hard on the body - hard on the
    back , knees , eyes , and lungs . constantly breathing in vaporized metals , ozone , and grinding soot -
    can't be healthy to the body.

    that said, if you truly enjoy the work , and you have a talent for it - go for it . i'd ask at your tech school
    and local weldors where they work for a living , what's available , and how they like it . perhaps there's
    a local shop where you can work part time and gain some experience and get in some trigger time .

    i would suggest learning some other disciplines that bridge well with welding -

    Industrial maintenance is in demand . it involves mechanics , hydraulics , electronics , welding ,
    machining , etc . pays well too .

    another good paying job is tool and die maintenance and repair - involves machining , welding ,
    metrology (precision measurement ) , metallurgy (heat treating , tool steels).....

    automotive- body / repair / mechanics - another trade where welding skills may make or break the
    deal when applying for a job .

    i am a professional machinist - welding was something i learned out of necessity . i wish i had taken
    welding classes while in school . it would have saved me many headaches learning on my own .
    a machinist who welds too is more of an asset than one who's clueless .

    be sure to absorb everything you can while you're in school . you can't learn on the job if you've
    no technical background - you'll just learn repetitive motions and what works for the job at hand .
    (conversely , tech school won't teach you how to work , won't give you job experience - you really need both)

    good luck.
    Miller S60 feeder
    Cobramatic push/pull feeder
    Miller CP-252ts
    Lincoln Tig250/Tig250
    Lincoln weldpak 100 -italian
    C-H 90A- italian
    Harris & Victor O\A
    full manual & CNC machine shop

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal-LA
    Posts
    9,860
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: High School Senior Getting Into Welding

    Welcome,

    Find out if your CC has a degree program, and if so look at the class schedule and requirements. Most include technical math, blueprint reading, metalurgy, machining, and so forth, All of these skills are highly desired and can deliver much higher pay. That is the route I went 35 years ago and I am glad I did.

    Good luck.
    Weld like a "WELDOR", not a wel-"DERR"
    MillerDynasty700DX,Dynasty350DX4ea,Dynasty200DX,Li ncolnSW200-2ea.,MillerMatic350P,MillerMatic200w/spoolgun,MKCobraMig260,Lincoln SP-170T,PlasmaCam/Hypertherm1250,HFProTig2ea,MigMax1ea.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    232
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: High School Senior Getting Into Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by tnmgcarbide View Post
    it all depends . nothing wrong with learning a skill , but being stuck with only that skill can be very
    limiting to the jobs you can get . weldors' jobs come in many forms - from $8.00/hr jobs where any
    monkey who can point a mig gun is fine - to critical boiler and pipeline work to underwater work to
    welding engineers . if the thought of 10 hr days production welding fence panels or patio furniture doesn't appeal
    to you...... maybe keep your options open . welding for hours on end is hard on the body - hard on the
    back , knees , eyes , and lungs . constantly breathing in vaporized metals , ozone , and grinding soot -
    can't be healthy to the body.

    that said, if you truly enjoy the work , and you have a talent for it - go for it . i'd ask at your tech school
    and local weldors where they work for a living , what's available , and how they like it . perhaps there's
    a local shop where you can work part time and gain some experience and get in some trigger time .

    i would suggest learning some other disciplines that bridge well with welding -

    Industrial maintenance is in demand . it involves mechanics , hydraulics , electronics , welding ,
    machining , etc . pays well too .

    another good paying job is tool and die maintenance and repair - involves machining , welding ,
    metrology (precision measurement ) , metallurgy (heat treating , tool steels).....

    automotive- body / repair / mechanics - another trade where welding skills may make or break the
    deal when applying for a job .

    i am a professional machinist - welding was something i learned out of necessity . i wish i had taken
    welding classes while in school . it would have saved me many headaches learning on my own .
    a machinist who welds too is more of an asset than one who's clueless .

    be sure to absorb everything you can while you're in school . you can't learn on the job if you've
    no technical background - you'll just learn repetitive motions and what works for the job at hand .
    (conversely , tech school won't teach you how to work , won't give you job experience - you really need both)

    good luck.
    I agree 100%. If I were you I'd take a tech school welding program. Get a job has a welder and continue taking night courses in machining/tool + die, electronics, auto or small engine repair, hydraulics. Then persue a maintance job. Please don't think your going to complete this tech school and get the highest paying welding job out there. A Welder also has to have experience. I've been a welder for 17 years and I just hate it when kids come out of school and think there worth big money. They can MIG weld steel but could hardly stick weld. So expect to start at a lower wage and a not very high tech shop until you get some experience. I'm in the midwest and they can't seem to get enough welders. My company offers a weld training program to anyone with high school or backyard welding experience and if they pass the weld test when there done with training they are eligible for a welding postion when one comes up. Even when the economy took a dive in 2008-9 some of my coworkers got laid off and found welding jobs at other local places with in 2-3 days. Just my opinion for what I've seen

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: High School Senior Getting Into Welding

    Alright thanks guys. An industrial maintenance job sounds like something Id really enjoy doing. Im good at fixing things. And my dad was an industrial maintenance technician... So maybe it runs in the family, eh? There is a community college near me that has an Industrial Technology section they teach HVAC, Welding and alot of Industrial related stuff. Here is a link if you guys want to see if this is what it takes to become an industrial maintenance technician: http://www.johnstoncc.edu/appliedind...echnology.aspx

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,627,729,152.62471 seconds with 13 queries