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Thread: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

  1. #1
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    Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Hello All,

    Please see my attached image. I am making a hybrid tee weld. On the opposite side of the weld, there is another piece of steel. So, I am only making a fillet weld on one side of the steel.

    Are there any other situations where a similar weld joint is used?? I'd like to take a look at other examples of this type of weld, so I can do it correctly!

    Thanks!
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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Uncommon isn't really the term I had in mind. Elaborate on what this is. Bigger than a toaster ? 200 feet long ?
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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Name:  weld.jpg
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Size:  19.7 KB Hi Burpee, I am attaching an additional photo. The weld is around the circumference of the circle. Imagine the circle diameter is 3 inches.

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    That's more like it. What thickness is the tube ?
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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    It's about 0.03 inches thick.

  6. #6
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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Almost like a socket weld. But not really.

    Would work for reference though.

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Wow. .030 is like lightweight bicycle tubing thin.

    I think if I were not Tigging it, I would have to roll it out, on the downhill side.
    Shoot, I might even filet braze it.

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    I enjoyed reading this post. I congratulate you for the terrific job you've made. Great stuff, just simply amazing!

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Thanks for the responses everyone. Geezerbill, I am new to welding. Can you give me an explanation on why you would suggest brazing the joint? What are the advantages? akabadnews, thanks for your insight - it definitely looks close to a socket weld, good reference point. The one difference between a socket weld and my situation is that there is an additional wall behind the first weld wall. As geezerbill said, it is a thin wall tube. I did a poor job of adding description to the image. The grey area represents the potential weld. I sectioned a pizza slice out of the circle to give a better view of the wall/weld joint.

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Brazing suggested because welding some 0.030 wall tube is in the realm of NotEasyToDo.

    Brazing suggested because then you are only getting things hot enough to melt and flow the brazing filler and not melting the tube or the 'plug'.

    The weld geometry is not really unusual or anything. Just a fillet weld on a circumference.
    The best laid schemes ... Gang oft agley ...

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Quote Originally Posted by MoonRise View Post
    Brazing suggested because welding some 0.030 wall tube is in the realm of NotEasyToDo.
    Yeah, it can disappear almost magically
    If you are new to welding, you might be able to accomplish a filet braze sooner than a good weld on .030.

    But, if you can get a stable arc at low enough amperage, and run it downhill, keeping most of the heat on the bottom (thicker?) piece, you can make the weld.

    You would need only to wash up a bit on to the .030, not needing equal build-up on it as might be on the thicker piece.

    I did some bicycle tubing (TIG) at about 10 amps, using .045 mig wire as filler.
    No foot pedal.
    It was exciting.

    I hope you have some extra similar material to get the feel of it.
    Let us know how it goes.

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    I'd think brazing would be the method of choice as the capillary action would provide much greater bond to larger inside shoulder than a small weld around the outer lip. Another possibility would be silver solder (braze), depending on the use. Can you face groove the part so the tube slides into a slot? This would give you a stronger joint and cleaner finish when brazed.

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    +1 on brazing or silver solder if you can get a good tight fit up. If you absolutely positively have to weld it, I'd want a 3" diameter chill bar inside the tube, a low amp tig, and a tig finger.

    I am admittedly a novice and low class bedframe welder and so would not even try to do weld that.

  14. #14
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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    56% silver braze and paste flux. Flux the mating surfaces of the plug and tube. Assemble, concentrate the flame on the heavy plug until the tubing gets red. Apply braze on outside of tube (where your weld is in the diagram) and allow it to wick into the joint. Use the flame to move the braze to where you want it. The braze will follow the the flux and heat.

    From the diagram, it looks similar to brazing on a cap to the end of a tube.

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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    I would have to agree with Forhire, cut a groove in the cap and silver solder. Even if welding a groove would make it a lot easier to pull of, you would be working a little bit of the end of the tube that way.

  16. #16
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    Re: Uncommon Weld Joint Question

    Pretty common to see that exact type of joint in the ORV world in suspension and steering links, the tubing is quite a bit heavier but the principal is the same. The joint is use is almost always in some sort of tension with the insert removing the lateral load from the weld joint and basically converting a portion of it to tension.

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