Page 509 of 516 FirstFirst ... 9409459499507508509510511 ... LastLast
Results 12,701 to 12,725 of 12888

Thread: Show us what you welded today

  1. #12701
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Mount Tabor VT
    Posts
    7,392
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Deadsquiggles View Post
    I’m not sure if this was directed at me, but I’ll answer. I’ma beginner but kinda not. When I first start working in ship repair as a outside machinist, we were expected to be able to do our own tack and stitch welds, and those of us that caught on better and could run good beads could find weekend week with the welders. Sounds ended up welding for 30-60 minutes a day, actual arc time, probably 5 of 7 days in my work week. But this was back in 2012-2013 when I was 18-19 and all we ran was 3/32” and 1/8” 7018. Needless to say, I was a decent stick welder, but I actually didn’t pick up a mig gun for the first time last year in April when I got back from a 3 month work trip and picked up a welder for the garage. Then I spent another 4 and half months out of town between then and Christmas. But I weld every chance I get at home. When my wife goes out with the girls, or my son is down for a nap, I’m always trying to find a reason to weld. Thin or thick plate, sheet metal, scraps, just to try and get better. I want to be as proficient with a mig gun as I was with a stinger.
    I'm sorry, I took your MIG as beginner TIG work. That's the goal MIG like TIG.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  2. Likes William McCormick liked this post
  3. #12702
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,963
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today


    Deadsquiggles


    Quote Originally Posted by Fnord5 View Post
    Opus is a water head, just ignore him. Chains don't melt. That's why
    they should be chained.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deadsquiggles View Post
    Not sure why I didn’t think about that since it makes perfect sense.
    Consider this . . .

    https://weldingweb.com/vbb/threads/4...erse+shrinkage

    Read the entire thread - note post #12 - this solidly establishes,
    my welding 'Water Head' credentials . . . and why I should be
    ignored . . .

    hth


    Opus



    .

  4. #12703
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Mount Tabor VT
    Posts
    7,392
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by OPUS FERRO View Post

    Deadsquiggles






    Consider this . . .

    https://weldingweb.com/vbb/threads/4...erse+shrinkage

    Read the entire thread - note post #12 - this solidly establishes,
    my welding 'Water Head' credentials . . . and why I should be
    ignored . . .

    hth


    Opus



    .
    I believe most of us agree you are overwhelmingly knowledgeable. My father would have summed it up as "smarter than 7 or 8 grownups". Even you must admit many of your posts are cryptic. While I have great respect, I often wonder "Why does he talk in riddles? Is he a Batman villain?"
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  5. #12704
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, California
    Posts
    1,589
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by OPUS FERRO View Post

    Deadsquiggles






    Consider this . . .

    https://weldingweb.com/vbb/threads/4...erse+shrinkage

    Read the entire thread - note post #12 - this solidly establishes,
    my welding 'Water Head' credentials . . . and why I should be
    ignored . . .

    hth


    Opus



    .
    And yet you've never shown your work.

    I don't question your knowledge(or at least your ability to Google search)
    But your nonsensical posting style and your offering "nuggets of information" that either miss the point of the post you are responding to, or are so obfuscated by your questionable syntax and word choice that they are the equivalent of a tourettes outburst.

  6. Likes ronsii, Shootr, VaughnT, timrb, Dave66 liked this post
  7. #12705
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock
    Posts
    5,985
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Miller 211
    Hypertherm PM 45
    1961 Lincoln Idealarc 250
    HTP 221


    True Wisdom only comes from Pain.

  8. Likes Fnord5, Shootr, Guardian liked this post
  9. #12706
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
    Posts
    33
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie B View Post
    I'm sorry, I took your MIG as beginner TIG work. That's the goal MIG like TIG.
    No worries. I'd love if my beginner TIG looked like that. However, I have no idea what my TIG would look like since I've never done it lol I definitely have less issues with MIG when I running longer beads, but with that lead holder, I was definitely trying to give the weld the best appearance as opposed to complete structural integrity. I'm definitely not worried about that holder needing more than a few tacks.
    Current machine: Miller 211
    Past machine(s): Hobart Handler 190
    “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants” - Thomas Jefferson

  10. #12707
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Central Wa. state
    Posts
    4,428
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Yesterday afternoon, I was helping build a foot bridge for our shooting range. 24 foot bridge to cross a 12-14 foot ditch. Name:  IMG_0954.jpg
Views: 696
Size:  218.7 KB
    Time for a beer and cigar after welding all the mesh down. Name:  IMG_0951.jpg
Views: 702
Size:  228.4 KB
    Theres going to be a handrail on the side with the overhanging mesh.

  11. #12708
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    264
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by 12V71 View Post
    Yesterday afternoon, I was helping build a foot bridge for our shooting range. 24 foot bridge to cross a 12-14 foot ditch. Name:  IMG_0954.jpg
Views: 696
Size:  218.7 KB
    Time for a beer and cigar after welding all the mesh down. Name:  IMG_0951.jpg
Views: 702
Size:  228.4 KB
    Theres going to be a handrail on the side with the overhanging mesh.
    Is that going to have some built in camber by tacking/welding that mesh with the structure supported in the middle?

  12. #12709
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Central Wa. state
    Posts
    4,428
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarmstrong View Post
    Is that going to have some built in camber by tacking/welding that mesh with the structure supported in the middle?
    Yep, it worked out with 2-1/2" of camber by just having it supported by the forklift when all the cross pieces and mesh were welded. The side beams are 4"x4"x.250 tube scavenged from some dead farm implement.

  13. #12710
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    109
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    4"x4" tubes over 24' span?

    Is there intermeddle support to make it 2 continuous spans?

    If not, that is going to a mighty flexible footbridge. Span/depth ratio of 24'x12"/4" = 72!

    Rule-of-thumb is SPAN/24 = 12" deep section required.

    Maybe the hardrails will stiffen it up :-)
    LINCOLN
    Square Wave TIG 200
    Power MIG 210 MP
    Ranger 330 MPX

    MILLER
    Thunderbolt AC/DC

    HYPERTHERM
    Powermax 190C
    Powermax 45XP

    HOUGAN
    HMD 130
    HMD 505

    FEIN/SLUGGER
    14" COLD METAL CHOP SAW
    9" COLD METAL HAND-HELD SAW

  14. #12711
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Southern CT
    Posts
    753
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Made 2 more v-twin stands, needed to park this shovelhead somewhere so I could work on the frame.
    Name:  8DB5FDEA-02A1-43FC-B39A-1E584F34EB8E.jpg
Views: 644
Size:  107.2 KBI
    Spent about 5 hours welding on the frame. Lower motor/transmission mounts are notorious for cracking.
    Finally finished the neck with the addition of a gusset. Previously fabricated a new front nose for the frame, backbone, neck and down tubes.
    Name:  997E2868-54CE-414F-927A-983B1944AF37.jpg
Views: 646
Size:  139.1 KB
    Ernie F.

  15. #12712
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Central Wa. state
    Posts
    4,428
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Ingenuity View Post
    4"x4" tubes over 24' span?

    Is there intermeddle support to make it 2 continuous spans?

    If not, that is going to a mighty flexible footbridge. Span/depth ratio of 24'x12"/4" = 72!

    Rule-of-thumb is SPAN/24 = 12" deep section required.

    Maybe the hardrails will stiffen it up :-)
    It's going to have 2 concrete supports (retaining walls) 6' from center. We blocked it at those points and everything is pretty stable. The approach ends will be buried to gently slope to the deck. But yes, If I was the one building the span frame I would have used a taller rectangle tube.

  16. #12713
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    109
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    I am pleased to hear that it is not spanning 24'. 12' central span with end overhangs seems more reasonable.
    LINCOLN
    Square Wave TIG 200
    Power MIG 210 MP
    Ranger 330 MPX

    MILLER
    Thunderbolt AC/DC

    HYPERTHERM
    Powermax 190C
    Powermax 45XP

    HOUGAN
    HMD 130
    HMD 505

    FEIN/SLUGGER
    14" COLD METAL CHOP SAW
    9" COLD METAL HAND-HELD SAW

  17. #12714
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    4,003
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Not much welding involved, but I decided to make a "Sam fixture" for my welding table...
    Name:  IMG_5332.jpg
Views: 491
Size:  106.8 KB
    Name:  IMG_5336.jpg
Views: 494
Size:  104.0 KB
    Name:  IMG_5337.jpg
Views: 497
Size:  99.8 KB

    For those not familiar, it allows you to hold a round rod or broken bolt in alignment to weld them back together straight...
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  18. Likes farmersammm liked this post
  19. #12715
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    86
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by txpitdog View Post
    Nothing as heavy duty as what y’all are working on, but the kids and I are building a drift trike. Our welds are 50/50 good vs. “well I suppose we’ll grind that and try it again”, lol.

    I think our frame is overbuilt, but that might help with some rigidity. We’re using 1 1/4” tubing with a 1/8” wall. The frame is flat and square. Weird tacking in the bearing hangers tonight and will start on the front end as soon as the back wheels come in. We’re going to try and use the height of the back wheels to set the neck angle on the front end so that the frame is flat.

    Then it will just be paint, and bolt the engine and everything on. Hope to be riding by spring break!




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Update on the trike. She’s a rolling chassis now. Got some hiccups with the throttle and parts we’re working through and waiting for the seat to come in.





    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  20. Likes ezduzit, farmersammm, whtbaron liked this post
  21. #12716
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock
    Posts
    5,985
    Post Thanks / Like

    Show us what you welded today

    interesting
    What size engine?

    Looks cool but I’m not sure if I would trust the two rails going up to the fork neck.
    Eventually it will crack or bust off.

    Maybe you can weld a couple gussets in there
    Miller 211
    Hypertherm PM 45
    1961 Lincoln Idealarc 250
    HTP 221


    True Wisdom only comes from Pain.

  22. #12717
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    86
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by John T View Post
    interesting
    What size engine?

    Looks cool but I’m not sure if I would trust the two rails going up to the fork neck.
    Eventually it will crack or bust off.

    Maybe you can weld a couple gussets in there
    We’re starting with a Predator 212cc 6.5hp. Depending on how it runs, we may add a Stage 1 kit and regear it. We’ll keep an eye on all the welds. It’s built from 1/8” material, so it is pretty rigid. It’ll run only on pavement, so I am hoping there won’t be much stress on the joints.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  23. Likes whtbaron liked this post
  24. #12718
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    4,514
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    I think John might have a valid point. You might try standing on the frame, and observing the deflection in the steel that connects to the fork neck. I'm sure it's pretty meaningful. The length of the two vertical pieces is pretty extreme.

    It's not so much about the welding, or the fatigue factor affecting the welds themselves. It's more about the fatigue acting on the steel adjacent to the welds. Any good filler material with good mechanical properties ought to handle the stress...........it's the parent metal that comes into question.

  25. #12719
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    1,256
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Nice project Why is the axle moved forward so far? You have less stability in a drift with a short wheelbase. Especially if you're sitting over the top of the axle, you're upsetting the weight distribution a long way.

    It'll be a lot of fun no matter what, though.
    Confirmation bias is the tendency to search for, interpret, favour, and recall information in a way that confirms or supports one's prior beliefs or values.

  26. #12720
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    86
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by farmersammm View Post
    I think John might have a valid point. You might try standing on the frame, and observing the deflection in the steel that connects to the fork neck. I'm sure it's pretty meaningful. The length of the two vertical pieces is pretty extreme.

    It's not so much about the welding, or the fatigue factor affecting the welds themselves. It's more about the fatigue acting on the steel adjacent to the welds. Any good filler material with good mechanical properties ought to handle the stress...........it's the parent metal that comes into question.
    We spent about an hour riding it by standing on the frame rails and pushing it like a scooter. No issues so far, but I’ll keep an eye on it. The frame is still parallel to the ground as it was before we rode it. I’m 180 and one of my boys is 190. I will probably add gussets to the joints where the down tubes meet the frame, just to make sure. We’ve put a lot of work into it, so might as well make sure it lasts.

    The rear axle looks really far forward, but that’s only because the back of the frame is longer than necessary. Our wheelbase is right in line with what I’ve seen recommended. It tracks straight and seems stable with the live rear axle. It’ll be fun using the engine torque to snap the back end loose. The engine will sit behind the axle, but it’ll be closer than we thought, so the last 4” of frame will serve as a bumper.

    Here’s a vid of my son pushing it. We still have to do the foot pegs, seat, and engine plate before hooking up the engine.




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  27. Likes William McCormick, whtbaron liked this post
  28. #12721
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,652
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Will you support that further in from the ends as well as on the ends? If not it could develop quite the bounce unless you add some rails that add to the rigidity. Looks good it may depress and stretch in the centers of the mesh.

    Sincerely,

    William McCormick
    If I wasn't so.....crazy, I wouldn't try to act normal, and you would be afraid.

  29. #12722
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,652
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by txpitdog View Post
    Update on the trike. She’s a rolling chassis now. Got some hiccups with the throttle and parts we’re working through and waiting for the seat to come in.





    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    When I was a kid not many kids had a go-cart, the only error in design was my father used a plastic wheel from an erector set. Upon drifting an excessive amount on a slightly sloped dew-soaked grassy area of my grandfather's yard and crashing into a tree I realized that the plastic does not hold up. My chest took the impact of the shaft and nut that held the plastic steering wheel, it left marks. I suggest looking at the effect of the inevitable crash before it happens. But it looks great.

    Sincerely,

    William McCormick
    If I wasn't so.....crazy, I wouldn't try to act normal, and you would be afraid.

  30. #12723
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,652
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by Ingenuity View Post
    4"x4" tubes over 24' span?

    Is there intermeddle support to make it 2 continuous spans?

    If not, that is going to a mighty flexible footbridge. Span/depth ratio of 24'x12"/4" = 72!

    Rule-of-thumb is SPAN/24 = 12" deep section required.

    Maybe the hardrails will stiffen it up :-)
    If you look at commercial construction done in the sixties you will see that if done to code a span of 24 feet required a 24" high support, if you didn't want flex, and in commercial buildings, you do not want flex. Because of equipment like punch presses that can setup different harmonics of movement that could cause lesser structural support to start to bounce.

    Sincerely,

    William McCormick
    If I wasn't so.....crazy, I wouldn't try to act normal, and you would be afraid.

  31. #12724
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    7,509
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick View Post
    When I was a kid not many kids had a go-cart, the only error in design was my father used a plastic wheel from an erector set. Upon drifting an excessive amount on a slightly sloped dew-soaked grassy area of my grandfather's yard and crashing into a tree I realized that the plastic does not hold up. My chest took the impact of the shaft and nut that held the plastic steering wheel, it left marks. I suggest looking at the effect of the inevitable crash before it happens. But it looks great.

    Sincerely,

    William McCormick
    Those tires are just wrapped with plastic piping. If the piping wears out you are left with the grippy rubber tires inside the pipe sleeves. This is done specifically for drifting.
    Lincoln, ESAB, Thermal Dynamics, Victor, Miller, Dewalt, Makita, Kalamzoo. Hand tools, power tools, welding and cutting tools.

  32. Likes whtbaron liked this post
  33. #12725
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    4,003
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Show us what you welded today

    I built a go-kart for the boys and we broke it... sometimes the failures are as much fun as the successes. Looks like fun... I'm a grandfather of 6 and I still want to drive it.
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  34. Likes N2 Welding liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,618,339,303.72224 seconds with 15 queries