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Thread: Future Welder.

  1. #1
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    Future Welder.

    Hi I am Brandon and I am 24 years old and I wish to make welding my career.

    If all goes good I will be going to trade school in July.

    I am not a genius but I am smart enough to know that the more you know will help you succeed in this trade. So I want to know as much as I can about welding before taking the course. If anyone has an itinerary that I can look up and study each part prior to college, that would be great. I want good marks that is why I want to start the theoretical part right now!

    Last year in June I went to the trade show in Vancouver, BC, Canada. I did two simulator welds and did good. I also did a real weld and the guy thought I did this before. He said I was a natural. But hey he could be bull ****ting me lol.

    So all I am looking for is to learn on these forums.

    Also how old were you when you got into this trade?

  2. #2
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    Re: Future Welder.

    So I found Welding for Dumbies. Is this a good start for someone who know nothing about welding?

    http://golftechs.us/Manuals/Welding%20for%20Dummies.pdf

  3. #3
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    Re: Future Welder.

    To be honest, i would have expected you to have years of hobby and home welding under your belt before ever thinking about becoming a welder. As a friend said to me, "you can't be something you don't know about".
    But, that being said, go have fun. Welding is for every one, and if you work hard, you can make some pretty $$$$$.

  4. #4
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    Re: Future Welder.

    Well that is the thing. I tried it once and I liked it. You can make a lot of money doing welding. And a lot of opportunities for improving your career. Such as under water welding.

  5. #5
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    Re: Future Welder.

    I would suggest working as such before investing in school. no offense to education, but everything you learn there you could be getting paid to learn.

    the fine details you don't learn from old grumps at work, you can learn here! just turned 25 and have been working as a welder/fabber since 18.

    a school will teach you process, theory, and try and teach skill, though that is something that comes purely from practice.

    process and theory is all over the internet. . . .for free!
    bosses stuff:
    trailblazer 325
    maxstar 200

    my stuff:
    sa 200
    fronius transpocket 180
    100 amp Lincoln w/f
    97 f350 DIT

    Kevin

  6. #6
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    Re: Future Welder.

    But it doesn't come with a certificate which you need!

  7. #7
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    Re: Future Welder.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Weldist View Post
    Well that is the thing. I tried it once and I liked it. You can make a lot of money doing welding. And a lot of opportunities for improving your career. Such as under water welding.
    I hate to be rude, but you should know more. I have a friend who is very sensitive to welding fumes and smoke, you could be too, but you might now know. Ya see what i am saying? Welding is not just about, well, welding. Its about prepping, science ( a little) , knowledge, and patience.
    What i would do if i were you, is go and buy a cheep stick welder right now. Just a Lincoln 225 AC buzz Box. You can start now, and just lay the beads down. Understand the different electrodes, metal types, possible jobs in the welding industry and what interests you, like under water welding. Get GOOD GEAR!
    Nothing will prepare you for welding trade school more then, well, welding. You, my friend, have the right idea. Welders will always be needed, and with the oil rush right now, they are in short supply.
    Now, go out and weld!

  8. #8
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    Re: Future Welder.

    You are right. I should try some welding and do a few projects.

    are you talking about something like this? http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/li...l#.Uu7zAPldV_Q

  9. #9
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    Re: Future Welder.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Weldist View Post
    You are right. I should try some welding and do a few projects.

    are you talking about something like this? http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/li...l#.Uu7zAPldV_Q
    CANADIAN TIRE!!!! You bet i am! Those babys come on sale at "crappy tire" about once a month. You can wait, or buy it and if it comes on sale next week, they should give you the sale price. Any way, you can pick up some electrodes for it, just a mixed bag of the different types. I really highly advise you check out ChuckE2009 on youtube. He is also a member here, but he makes amazing welding vids, and has tons of knowledge on different electrodes.
    Grab a cheap helmet, gloves, and start welding scrap together. Getting the feeling of stick welding with that, will really help you in the long run.
    If you don't mind me asking, where in Canada are you? I am in Nova Scotia..

  10. #10
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    Re: Future Welder.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian Welding View Post
    CANADIAN TIRE!!!! You bet i am! Those babys come on sale at "crappy tire" about once a month. You can wait, or buy it and if it comes on sale next week, they should give you the sale price. Any way, you can pick up some electrodes for it, just a mixed bag of the different types. I really highly advise you check out ChuckE2009 on youtube. He is also a member here, but he makes amazing welding vids, and has tons of knowledge on different electrodes.
    Grab a cheap helmet, gloves, and start welding scrap together. Getting the feeling of stick welding with that, will really help you in the long run.
    If you don't mind me asking, where in Canada are you? I am in Nova Scotia..

    I will take your advice. I am from Rockland, Ontario, Canada.

    Also what is your opinion on these? http://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/flux-cor.../6000098155046 , http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/ma...l#.Uu73I_ldV_Q

  11. #11
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    Re: Future Welder.

    weldingfordummies may be a decent read, but I think I could make it much shorter.

    basically, in arc welding, you are using high amp, low volt (relatively) current to arc from an electrode (big word for something that conducts electricity) to what you are welding. jumping electricity through air creates a LOT of heat, and this heat will melt your base metal, or what you want to weld. now we have problem: you sent electricity through the air, got the air hot, and melted metal. ever take any basic science or chemistry classes? this melted, heated metal has been exposed to oxygen, and since just about everything will react with oxygen, the carbon in the steel has turned into co2, and the iron has turned into iron-oxide. . . .neither one is strong soooooo

    we need to protect the weld with something.. . . A NON REACTIVE GAS! you may remember your periodic table, and the "noble gasses" (argon, helium, etc). but, there are other gases that are quite stable too, like nitrogen and co2. different ones work in different quantities to produce welds for different materials and processes. lets just use argon, so, with a non-consumable electrode, (tungsten has a high melting point, I bet that would work), we can send our current through our makeshift little argon atmosphere, and melt some metal! no reaction, metals have fused together and made a strong weld.

    new problem though: the weld holding two pieces has taken material from each to make the weld, rendering them thinner and weaker than we want them soooooo. . . . .we need to add material to the weld. pick an alloy that is compatible, but stronger than the base metal would be really cool right? it is often so with common filler metals. they also contain various elements that may sacrifice themselves to bond with impurities/ oxides to make the weld cleaner than the base metal. you could hold a wire or rod of this material in the hand not holding the electrode, and manually feed into the weldment. this is basic tig (tungsten inert gas) welding or GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) as they would teach you in school. they got away from using the inert gas lingo because some shielding gasses are not inert (not a noble gas) but are still considered "non-reactive"

    other processes try to outsmart tig welding, but are more or less similar. maybe, in our non-reactive atmosphere, we could make the filler metal into the electrode, and mechanically feed it into the weldment at a constant speed. . . . . .so, lets take a spool of compatible wire, let an electrode contact it, (wire is energized) and let it feed itself at a rate decided by a dial on the machine. . . .this is basic mig (metal inert gas) or gmaw (gas metal arc welding). various shielding Gasses, and various Metal filler/ electrodes could be used.

    now, where it all started, but to me is the most complex, is stick-welding. take the consumable electrode/ filler idea from mig, and the manual filler feed from tig, and combine the result to get stick. like mig, the filler is energized to become the electrode at the same time. like tig, this filler must be manually fed into the weldment. so, take a rod of compatible material, put it into something you can hold onto that will energize it, and feed it into the weld. the rod gets shorter and shorter as you push it in to make the weld, and is replaced when used up.

    but heres the problem with stick welding or SMAW (shielded metal arc welding), we talked about filling the weld, but with our varying distance from the non-consumable rod-holding thing we hold in our hand (electrode holder, but its a filler holder at the same time) to the actual weld, how do we provide a shielding, non-reactive gas? you cant, not from a bottle anyway. so, some smart chemists found some chemicals they could coat the rod with, that would sacrifice themselves to the oxygenated, natural atmosphere, and create a shielding gas!!!! that's why stick welding rods have a coating on them, the coating is sacrificial, and "burns" to create an atmosphere around the weld to protect it from oxygen. some components in the coating liquefy, and cover the weld to further protect from the harms of oxygen. they harden outside the weld and are easy chipped off to expose the weld.

    you can take the principal of this coating, and add it to the mig process. fill the wire with the same chemical makeup, and it creates its own shielding gas. now, we don't have to haul a bottle around to wherever we work!

    these are the basics and there is still a lot to cover as far as polarities, voltages vs amperages, and the unique characteristics of each shielding gas, but in school what I just told you would have taken a huge amount of time and money. this to me, is as much education as is required to start welding for a living
    bosses stuff:
    trailblazer 325
    maxstar 200

    my stuff:
    sa 200
    fronius transpocket 180
    100 amp Lincoln w/f
    97 f350 DIT

    Kevin

  12. #12
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    Re: Future Welder.

    Well, truly those are, crap. The flux core welder is a very cheap and under powered "pig iron" or china crap. Made poorly, and can't lay a good bead worth a darn...
    That stick welder, well, the reviews should say enough about it! Haha! Not very good.
    I also advise you check out Kijiji in your area and look for welders. Hobart, Miller, Lincoln, those are the names of welder you should look for. You can normally pick up a Lincoln for next to nothing, the the seller normally throws in a bunch of goodies. I know your budget is prolly' tight. And really, there is no need to go "all out" on your first gear. Heck, i use a 12 buck helmet from Princess Auto right now. It works good, but never skimp on welding gloves, and jackets. A mastercraft (canadiantire) angle grinder (4.5") would be a solid investment if you do get a nice welder. Its the best grinder i have found for its price.
    By the way, i think you should get a stick welder. Its what most "pro" or certified welders and pipe fitters use. Flux core is more for hobby and backyard welders. And a decent MIG or TIG with the right gasses can set a fella back some heavy money.

  13. #13
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    Re: Future Welder.

    Quote Originally Posted by 92dlxman View Post
    weldingfordummies may be a decent read, but I think I could make it much shorter.

    basically, in arc welding, you are using high amp, low volt (relatively) current to arc from an electrode (big word for something that conducts electricity) to what you are welding. jumping electricity through air creates a LOT of heat, and this heat will melt your base metal, or what you want to weld. now we have problem: you sent electricity through the air, got the air hot, and melted metal. ever take any basic science or chemistry classes? this melted, heated metal has been exposed to oxygen, and since just about everything will react with oxygen, the carbon in the steel has turned into co2, and the iron has turned into iron-oxide. . . .neither one is strong soooooo

    we need to protect the weld with something.. . . A NON REACTIVE GAS! you may remember your periodic table, and the "noble gasses" (argon, helium, etc). but, there are other gases that are quite stable too, like nitrogen and co2. different ones work in different quantities to produce welds for different materials and processes. lets just use argon, so, with a non-consumable electrode, (tungsten has a high melting point, I bet that would work), we can send our current through our makeshift little argon atmosphere, and melt some metal! no reaction, metals have fused together and made a strong weld.

    new problem though: the weld holding two pieces has taken material from each to make the weld, rendering them thinner and weaker than we want them soooooo. . . . .we need to add material to the weld. pick an alloy that is compatible, but stronger than the base metal would be really cool right? it is often so with common filler metals. they also contain various elements that may sacrifice themselves to bond with impurities/ oxides to make the weld cleaner than the base metal. you could hold a wire or rod of this material in the hand not holding the electrode, and manually feed into the weldment. this is basic tig (tungsten inert gas) welding or GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) as they would teach you in school. they got away from using the inert gas lingo because some shielding gasses are not inert (not a noble gas) but are still considered "non-reactive"

    other processes try to outsmart tig welding, but are more or less similar. maybe, in our non-reactive atmosphere, we could make the filler metal into the electrode, and mechanically feed it into the weldment at a constant speed. . . . . .so, lets take a spool of compatible wire, let an electrode contact it, (wire is energized) and let it feed itself at a rate decided by a dial on the machine. . . .this is basic mig (metal inert gas) or gmaw (gas metal arc welding). various shielding Gasses, and various Metal filler/ electrodes could be used.

    now, where it all started, but to me is the most complex, is stick-welding. take the consumable electrode/ filler idea from mig, and the manual filler feed from tig, and combine the result to get stick. like mig, the filler is energized to become the electrode at the same time. like tig, this filler must be manually fed into the weldment. so, take a rod of compatible material, put it into something you can hold onto that will energize it, and feed it into the weld. the rod gets shorter and shorter as you push it in to make the weld, and is replaced when used up.

    but heres the problem with stick welding or SMAW (shielded metal arc welding), we talked about filling the weld, but with our varying distance from the non-consumable rod-holding thing we hold in our hand (electrode holder, but its a filler holder at the same time) to the actual weld, how do we provide a shielding, non-reactive gas? you cant, not from a bottle anyway. so, some smart chemists found some chemicals they could coat the rod with, that would sacrifice themselves to the oxygenated, natural atmosphere, and create a shielding gas!!!! that's why stick welding rods have a coating on them, the coating is sacrificial, and "burns" to create an atmosphere around the weld to protect it from oxygen. some components in the coating liquefy, and cover the weld to further protect from the harms of oxygen. they harden outside the weld and are easy chipped off to expose the weld.

    you can take the principal of this coating, and add it to the mig process. fill the wire with the same chemical makeup, and it creates its own shielding gas. now, we don't have to haul a bottle around to wherever we work!

    these are the basics and there is still a lot to cover as far as polarities, voltages vs amperages, and the unique characteristics of each shielding gas, but in school what I just told you would have taken a huge amount of time and money. this to me, is as much education as is required to start welding for a living

    That a bit confusing for a noobie like The Weldist to understand. You should tone it down a bit. Start what the main processes of welding maybe???
    Haha! Just my 2 cents.

  14. #14
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    Re: Future Welder.

    the company you work for will certify you, I worked with one guy that had a school cert and was good. he was really good. the rest, well they sucked.

    welding is a carreer that appeals to the less educated for a reason. . . . it doesn't really require any education.

    not saying that some welders aren't educated, and DEFINITELY not saying welders are uneducatable, as it does require more knowledge than many jobs need.

    just that, you can get paid to learn welding by doing so under somebody that will check your machine, your filler, your gas, and make decent money when you prove you can take care of all that yourself
    bosses stuff:
    trailblazer 325
    maxstar 200

    my stuff:
    sa 200
    fronius transpocket 180
    100 amp Lincoln w/f
    97 f350 DIT

    Kevin

  15. #15
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    Re: Future Welder.

    Quote Originally Posted by 92dlxman View Post
    the company you work for will certify you, I worked with one guy that had a school cert and was good. he was really good. the rest, well they sucked.

    welding is a carreer that appeals to the less educated for a reason. . . . it doesn't really require any education.

    not saying that some welders aren't educated, and DEFINITELY not saying welders are uneducatable, as it does require more knowledge than many jobs need.

    just that, you can get paid to learn welding by doing so under somebody that will check your machine, your filler, your gas, and make decent money when you prove you can take care of all that yourself
    True, but keep in mind, this guy has only EVER welded ONCE! He (in my honest opinion) could use some schooling. To understand how to set up a welder, how to lay good beads, etc. If he were a high school grad with years of practice, he very well could skip all this crap. But, he is BRAND NEW to welding, my friend...

  16. #16
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    Re: Future Welder.

    If you want to study something then study the numbers on the rod what they mean and what thier uses are, and there are alot of different companies making specialty rods with thier own numbers. In looking at a welding job metal prep, fittment, holding, tacking, correct rod or filler metal, Polarity, amperage, position, and thickness are ALL things that you can study. and once you know these things, when you look at a job, you will ask yourself all of these questions before you strike an arc or get the job.

    Swanny

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