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Thread: Blacksmithing tools

  1. #1951
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    tackit here is a pic of what I made for my propane forge. It is a horizontal 2" receiver with telescopic work rest for "long" material.




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  3. #1952
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by tackit View Post
    ... could you please explain in more detail what you are getting at, Thanks
    You're not the first person to not understand me!

    Like Lis2323 shows in his picture, you've got to have something outside of the forge to support long bars that you might heating. If you're only doing something that's 6" long, sure, you can rest it in the forge and leave enough sticking out that you can grab with the tongs. BUT.... when you try heating the end of a long bar, the weight outside of the forge is going to tip it down. This leaves the heating end jammed up against the roof of the forge, chewing up the insulation and maybe just sliding out entirely. Very aggravating!

    I have a little shelf outside my not-so-majestic. Had to add it myself since the forge doesn't come with any kind of shelves or outrigger-style supports.

    I keep saying I'm going to make something like this.... and I just never get around to it.

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    Kinda funny, too, since I'm always complaining about not spending enough time forging for myself and trying out new techniques. Here's a great forging project... and I automatically start thinking how I could weld it up real quick just to get me by. I frustrate myself no end!!
    Last edited by VaughnT; 01-26-2021 at 08:59 AM.

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  5. #1953
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    With the first post I couldn't figure out why you were putting a chimney on it.... now I see it's a stand. Duh! Looks great! Where did you source your brick from?
    I got the bricks off of Amazon. Pro tip - look for the "Amazon Warehouse" section (if your area has it available). That's where they list all the returns or damaged stuff at a discount. Normally $43, I got these for $31 - all because the box was dented. But the way the manufacturer packages it - awesome. Nice thick foam pieces surrounding every brick on all sides and tight - they can't shift and chip.
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  7. #1954
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by tackit View Post


    That's a really well thought out Forge design Lis, were did you get the end caps, are they new pickled pipe covers? Again nice job! I like your your forge design better than what I had in mind, I'm going to copy it if you don't mind.
    The flat faced end caps were from my friend Phil many years ago. I don’t recall if I ever knew what they were originally designed for or where they came from.

    IF I had more, two of them would already be on their way to you.


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  8. #1955
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Fire bricks are readily available in my area from the masonry supply outfits and even some lumber yards.


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  10. #1956
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    Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    You're not the first person to not understand me!

    Like Lis2323 shows in his picture, you've got to have something outside of the forge to support long bars that you might heating. If you're only doing something that's 6" long, sure, you can rest it in the forge and leave enough sticking out that you can grab with the tongs. BUT.... when you try heating the end of a long bar, the weight outside of the forge is going to tip it down. This leaves the heating end jammed up against the roof of the forge, chewing up the insulation and maybe just sliding out entirely. Very aggravating!

    I have a little shelf outside my not-so-majestic. Had to add it myself since the forge doesn't come with any kind of shelves or outrigger-style supports.

    I keep saying I'm going to make something like this.... and I just never get around to it.

    Name:  Cam Lock Support.jpg
Views: 100
Size:  188.4 KB



    Kinda funny, too, since I'm always complaining about not spending enough time forging for myself and trying out new techniques. Here's a great forging project... and I automatically start thinking how I could weld it up real quick just to get me by. I frustrate myself no end!!
    I would be inclined to fab up one universal stand and use it for stock support for bandsaw, drill press etc .....




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    Last edited by Lis2323; 01-26-2021 at 01:47 PM.
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  12. #1957
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    I would be inclined to fab up one universal stand.....
    I still love that stand. Great design and aesthetic, and I sure wouldn't mind having a dozen of them around the shop to keep a unified look.

    It's exactly the kind of thing I normally do, a few quick welds and you're in business. As a blacksmith, though, I'm seeing that a lot of people (myself included) are relying on that ability to glue the metal together and it's draining the creativity from us. Nobody thinks about how to forge something for the shop because it's quicker and easier to just weld up a couple of straight bars and lots of 90º angles. No flair. No riveting. No bending and shaping the metal like you'd expect from some who can make a hundred S-hooks and brag about it all over social media.

    For example, let's consider this wonderful hammer rack made by a fellow smith. He could have got some straight bars out of the rack and welded them together, but then he wouldn't have gotten the experience that comes with making all those little details.

    Too often, we forget the lessons that come with the projects and how we can apply them to paying jobs. If we don't practice on our own kit, we're behind the curve when it comes to filling a custom order. Plus, it's great advertising for when customers walk in the door and can see an element that they really like, but never knew existed before.



    Or a wall-mounted style that might be a bit simpler to construct...




    Like I said, though, I'm the world's worst when it comes to preaching and not following my own gospel. It's just so much easier to throw up something quick-n-dirty that'll get the job done!

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  14. #1958
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    I still love that stand. Great design and aesthetic, and I sure wouldn't mind having a dozen of them around the shop to keep a unified look.

    It's exactly the kind of thing I normally do, a few quick welds and you're in business. As a blacksmith, though, I'm seeing that a lot of people (myself included) are relying on that ability to glue the metal together and it's draining the creativity from us. Nobody thinks about how to forge something for the shop because it's quicker and easier to just weld up a couple of straight bars and lots of 90º angles. No flair. No riveting. No bending and shaping the metal like you'd expect from some who can make a hundred S-hooks and brag about it all over social media.

    For example, let's consider this wonderful hammer rack made by a fellow smith. He could have got some straight bars out of the rack and welded them together, but then he wouldn't have gotten the experience that comes with making all those little details.

    Too often, we forget the lessons that come with the projects and how we can apply them to paying jobs. If we don't practice on our own kit, we're behind the curve when it comes to filling a custom order. Plus, it's great advertising for when customers walk in the door and can see an element that they really like, but never knew existed before.



    Or a wall-mounted style that might be a bit simpler to construct...




    Like I said, though, I'm the world's worst when it comes to preaching and not following my own gospel. It's just so much easier to throw up something quick-n-dirty that'll get the job done!
    That sounds like me!!!!

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  16. #1959
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    LOL.... ditto.... I was thinking after one of his previous posts that I'm more of a function over form sort of guy... but I'm my only customer and nobody even sees my work unless I post it up here.
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  18. #1960
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by tackit View Post
    Very kind of you to say that Lis. Those caps make your forge look store bought. I'll come up with something, I have a ring roller I can make the side of the caps with, i just need to get the tube in my hands so I take measurements. I don't think the pipe caps would fit tube anyway, unless I rolled a piece of 1 X 3/8 flat stock and welded it on the ends of the what I think will be 12" OD tube.
    I know round forges like Terry's look great... but bricks are square. lol... I may suffer the wrath of Vaughn ( odd how that rhymes with the wrath of Kahn ) but wouldn't it be easier to weld up a square forge than wait for your buddy's gimpy leg to heal? I know I'm back to function over form, but it seems to me what you really want is a lot of heat, and a well insulated way to keep it there. Do you really want to be putting the square peg in a round hole?
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  20. #1961
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

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  22. #1962
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    I know round forges like Terry's look great... but bricks are square. lol... I may suffer the wrath of Vaughn ( odd how that rhymes with the wrath of Kahn ) but wouldn't it be easier to weld up a square forge than wait for your buddy's gimpy leg to heal? I know I'm back to function over form, but it seems to me what you really want is a lot of heat, and a well insulated way to keep it there. Do you really want to be putting the square peg in a round hole?
    Our gas and oil fired furnaces were all round. Flame was introduced so it traveled around the curve of the lining rather than straight onto it. We were putting crucibles into the furnace and it gave a more even heat, rather than have the flame impinge on the crucible or refractory. We used Blu Ram from Vesuvius, service temperature to 3100 F. It is a rammable refractory so you can make a monolithic block in whatever shape you want, either by forming it with a hammer or ramming it into forms. It worked great for us. http://corerefractorysys.com/index.p...ts/monolithics
    ---Meltedmetal

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  24. #1963
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    And to qualify my remarks, I am probably this least experienced in this crew. I don't even have a working forge yet... just throwing out ideas.
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  26. #1964
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    ...{odd how that rhymes with the wrath of Kahn... ) but wouldn't it be easier to weld up a square forge than wait for your buddy's gimpy leg to heal? I know I'm back to function over form, but it seems to me what you really want is a lot of heat, and a well insulated way to keep it there. Do you really want to be putting the square peg in a round hole?
    Just about, spot on the money. The outside shell can be just about any shape you want since there's so much difference between it and what the chamber looks like.

    Quote Originally Posted by Meltedmetal View Post
    Our gas and oil fired furnaces were all round. Flame was introduced so it traveled around the curve of the lining rather than straight onto it. We were putting crucibles into the furnace and it gave a more even heat, rather than have the flame impinge on the crucible or refractory.
    MM, yep. Having the flame "swirl" around the chamber does a far better job of distributing the heat and minimizing the "hot spot". When you have the flame pointing directly at one surface, impacting in a straight 90º orientation, it causes major major flame erosion in that spot. Far better to have the flame entering at an angle so it glances off the plane, swirling around the forge.

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    With every commercially-available forge I've seen, it's a balance between what is good physics, what is good for manufacturing, and what is good for dealing with the vagaries of shipping. A great forge design might be too expensive for the average person, or so flimsy that it arrives with all the insulation cracked after being bounced around by UPS.

    I've never liked forges made from pipes, personally. While they work for a lot of people, and they are certainly strong enough, I've always found them rather limiting in terms of capacity since you're constrained by what size pipe you can find. Sure, if you can get something honking big, you can design a forge that's got plenty of room in the chamber. For companies making forges, it's often easier to buy lengths of large pipe simply because that's a mass-produced thing and easier than forming their own shells. There's always that balance that needs to be struck because the more time and effort they put into the shell, the more costly the forge is going to be and the fewer people who are will be able to afford it. The companies already have to compete with the DIY types.

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    For the average tinkerer putzying around on the weekends, some sheet metal can be bend up in no time flat. Even using the very expensive and very sheets available from places like Tractor Supply, you can have a shell "rolled" in mere moments just by bending it over your leg. With self-tapping screws and rivets, you don't even need to weld it up. After laying in the insulation and refractory, it'll be plenty strong enough to move around if you needed to carry it somewhere.

    MM, I opted for Metrikote and Cast-O-Lite for the refractory and IR reflective coatings. No idea how they'll work compared to what you're familiar with, but I'll be danged if I could make sense of all the options that were available. Bubble Alumina is fun to say, but what does it mean for the average smith and his forge? Trying to choose the best for a forge in terms of durability, heat expansion, cost and all that really gave me a headache.

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  28. #1965
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    One of my favorite forge designs made from sheet metal....

    They even took the time to angle the burner tubes so they'd get the swirling heat mentioned earlier.


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  30. #1966
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    I like the look of that angle iron mailbox design, Vaughn.


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  32. #1967
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    MM, I opted for Metrikote and Cast-O-Lite for the refractory and IR reflective coatings. No idea how they'll work compared to what you're familiar with, but I'll be danged if I could make sense of all the options that were available. Bubble Alumina is fun to say, but what does it mean for the average smith and his forge? Trying to choose the best for a forge in terms of durability, heat expansion, cost and all that really gave me a headache.
    Take 2 aspirin and call me in the morning.


    We used a variety of refractories and types. Castable for arches in a reverbratory, plastic in pit furnaces and crucibles, dry ram and/or alumina or magnesia pots in our induction furnace along with refractory slurries, bricks and plasters. If one can find the right people at the refractory company they can recommend a suitable product for the job at hand. I presume that like, with most things, the best idea is to use the right tool for the job. That includes the size and shape of the forge. Build it to suit what you plan to do and when that changes build another one.
    ---Meltedmetal

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  34. #1968
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    I like the look of that angle iron mailbox design, Vaughn.
    Ain't that sweet? As soon as I saw the pic, I thought, "hmm, that'll make an awesome forge!", so I slid it over into my little file folder of ideas. I have some 8" heavy-wall pipe that I just might try this with. I need a new mail box, but I hate just cutting up some pipe and slapping a door on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Meltedmetal View Post
    I presume that like, with most things, the best idea is to use the right tool for the job. That includes the size and shape of the forge. Build it to suit what you plan to do and when that changes build another one.
    Wise words. Someone once said that 'better is the enemy of good enough' and I think that might apply here.

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  36. #1969
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Manufacturers used to do a better job of balancing form and function:



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  38. #1970
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    I'd give my eye teeth for a set of stands like that!

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  40. #1971
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    What are eye teeth?


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  42. #1972
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Actually he probably meant to say I-Teeth... apples new chewing apparatus designed to link to your I-phone and control eating habits...


    Just kidding .... but I'm sure they're thinking about something like that

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  44. #1973
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    No idea which teeth they are, but there are eye teeth. It's an old saying so you know it has value!

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  46. #1974
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Google search -Canines are sometimes referred to as eye teeth because of their alignment under the eyes. Incisors. Incisors are the front teeth on both your upper and lower jaws. Because their primary purpose is to bite into food, their name came from the Latin word “incidere,” which means cutter.

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  48. #1975
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Finally got the CAT loader delivered on Friday, and after they left I notice this nice cross peen hammer head on the floor. Not sure what they were using it for yet, but I don't think I'll put a handle on it until I'm sure it's not part of the parking brake....

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    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
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