Page 70 of 73 FirstFirst ... 20606869707172 ... LastLast
Results 1,726 to 1,750 of 1820

Thread: Blacksmithing and forging

  1. #1726
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    3,166
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    No problem twisting as long as it is hot enough.
    Make sure it is very hot or it might start to tear.



    Sent from my SM-G996U using Tapatalk
    Millermatic 252 MIG
    Miller Dynasty 200DX TIG
    Miller Spectrum 625 Plasma
    Altas 12x36 Metal Lathe
    Bridgeport Milling Machine
    www.psacustomcreations.com

  2. Likes VaughnT liked this post
  3. #1727
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    997
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Vaughn - I'm addicted to that Russian guy on YouTube you posted a while back. Can't understand a word he says, but I can understand each process. Thanks for turning me on to him.
    Yeswelder MIG-205DS
    (3) Angle Grinders at the Ready
    Just a hobbyist trying to improve

  4. Likes VaughnT, Bruce liked this post
  5. #1728
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,715
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Don't gotta speak Russian when you speak Blacksmith!


  6. Likes whtbaron, Lis2323, Shootr liked this post
  7. #1729
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    3,166
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Another stainless steel arm band/bracelet. This one is 1/2" material. The previous customer wanted something a bit more substantial.



    Sent from my SM-G996U using Tapatalk
    Millermatic 252 MIG
    Miller Dynasty 200DX TIG
    Miller Spectrum 625 Plasma
    Altas 12x36 Metal Lathe
    Bridgeport Milling Machine
    www.psacustomcreations.com

  8. Likes VaughnT, whtbaron, Bruce, N2 Welding liked this post
  9. #1730
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,828
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    If he wasn't a weight lifter before, he will be now...
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  10. Likes Bruce, N2 Welding liked this post
  11. #1731
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    3,166
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    If he wasn't a weight lifter before, he will be now...
    He is a lifter and pretty stout.

    Sent from my SM-G996U using Tapatalk
    Millermatic 252 MIG
    Miller Dynasty 200DX TIG
    Miller Spectrum 625 Plasma
    Altas 12x36 Metal Lathe
    Bridgeport Milling Machine
    www.psacustomcreations.com

  12. Likes whtbaron liked this post
  13. #1732
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Made my first knife at work. Didn't turn out to bad for only having a torch,channel locks, 2 lb. Sledge and a vise.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  14. #1733
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,828
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    No anvil? What did you hammer on? Cliche or not, I want to make one some day too, and a really crude, ugly sword to hang beside Grandpa's broad axe...
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  15. Likes Bruce liked this post
  16. #1734
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    997
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Now that I (almost) have a functional belt grinder and a bucket of old files - I want to start trying to make some knives.

    Is it possible to anneal a file just where the tang will be, and leave the rest of the file hardened?

    Propane torch? Suspend file in water with just tang above and heated?
    Yeswelder MIG-205DS
    (3) Angle Grinders at the Ready
    Just a hobbyist trying to improve

  17. #1735
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    3,166
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Yes, you could anneal the tang that way.
    Why only the tang? The rest of the file or knife is going to be brittle.
    Why not anneal the whole thing, bang on it to general shape, grind to shape, heat treat, then temper like you would normally do?
    There are plenty of knives made out of files. If you want the look or texture of the file left on a portion if the knife, that is easy to do.

    Sent from my SM-G996U using Tapatalk
    Millermatic 252 MIG
    Miller Dynasty 200DX TIG
    Miller Spectrum 625 Plasma
    Altas 12x36 Metal Lathe
    Bridgeport Milling Machine
    www.psacustomcreations.com

  18. Likes shortfuse, Shootr liked this post
  19. #1736
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    instructables.com detailed instructions of building forges, making molds ,casting ,and forge welding

  20. #1737
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    No anvil? What did you hammer on? Cliche or not, I want to make one some day too, and a really crude, ugly sword to hang beside Grandpa's broad axe...
    Well I used the bottom jaw of a vise because it was the flattest thing we have in the shop with no distortion.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  21. Likes Bruce liked this post
  22. #1738
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    AR
    Posts
    2,182
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by psacustomcreations View Post
    Yes, you could anneal the tang that way.
    Why only the tang? The rest of the file or knife is going to be brittle.
    Why not anneal the whole thing, bang on it to general shape, grind to shape, heat treat, then temper like you would normally do?
    There are plenty of knives made out of files. If you want the look or texture of the file left on a portion if the knife, that is easy to do.

    Sent from my SM-G996U using Tapatalk
    X2 on psa's comments on using files.

  23. Likes Shootr liked this post
  24. #1739
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    6,018
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    X3 Good info worth filing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    :

  25. Likes Bruce liked this post
  26. #1740
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,828
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by IAMsteelworker View Post
    Well I used the bottom jaw of a vise because it was the flattest thing we have in the shop with no distortion.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    Better find yourself a flat chunk of steel of some sort... railroad iron or anything... or you'll be joining the boys in the vise repair thread.
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  27. Likes Bruce liked this post
  28. #1741
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Better find yourself a flat chunk of steel of some sort... railroad iron or anything... or you'll be joining the boys in the vise repair thread.
    Ehh, thats easy enough. If this one breaks and I can't fix it, just get a new one on order. Now that you mention it I did see a small piece of rail in the shop a couple weeks ago but I believe it got pitched when I cleaned it out.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  29. #1742
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,715
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Shootr View Post
    Is it possible to anneal a file just where the tang will be, and leave the rest of the file hardened? Propane torch? Suspend file in water with just tang above and heated?
    Yes, you can spot anneal. Just put the file in your vise with the tang standing up straight. Heat it with your torch until you see a little red showing. The jaws of the vise act as a heat sink, stopping any of the tempering from going beyond wherever you place them.

    As Pat noted, the file is way too hard to make a good knife and will need to be tempered back a bit. You might as well do this before anything else because it only makes the grinding and shaping that much easier. Further annealing, like you're asking about, is great to soften the steel as much as possible so you can drill through it for handle pins. Making that hard steel as dead soft as you can will make you much happier when it comes to drilling through it!

    Because files are so hard, you can put them in the oven at whatever heat you want for your temper.... and it'll be knife-hard when it comes out. This saves you having to harden and temper it from the ground up since it's already hardened and tempered. By putting it in the oven, you're softening it to the point that it'll make a good knife, leaving it plenty hard enough to hold an edge and be easier to work with your grinders. You just have to watch that you keep it cool as you're grinding and shaping, especially as you get the edge thinned down.

  30. Likes Shootr, Bruce liked this post
  31. #1743
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,715
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Challenge!


    I mentioned this before but it got lost in the weeds. So, to start the new year out right, I'm issuing a challenge to any and all.....


    Name:  IMG_2154.jpg
Views: 69
Size:  88.9 KBName:  fullsizeoutput_832.jpg
Views: 73
Size:  125.5 KB


    As you can see, there's not much to it. Used for making wire clamps (the predecessor to screw-type hose clamps), these tools are very handy to have around the home and shop. The wire clamps will do things that the more modern hose clamps simply cannot do.

    No rules except that it needs to get the job done and have some forging involved since this is a forging sticky. Use what you've got, make it as nice as you know how, then start thinking about all the ways you can use it!

    If you need some inspiration, I highly recommend watching Advoko's video on how he made his and uses it around his camp. Great guy and a great craftsman, so you should already be watching his videos!


  32. Likes Shootr, whtbaron, N2 Welding, Bruce liked this post
  33. #1744
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    997
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Ahh, never gave any thought to them being too brittle as is.

    Great information from you all, thank you for taking the time to post it for me. Off to learn about tempering temperatures and methods.

    Stopped by my local metal supply and went through the drops to get materials to work on the grinder rest - after work that'll be today's fun. Gotta get that right first.
    Yeswelder MIG-205DS
    (3) Angle Grinders at the Ready
    Just a hobbyist trying to improve

  34. Likes whtbaron liked this post
  35. #1745
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,828
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by IAMsteelworker View Post
    Ehh, thats easy enough. If this one breaks and I can't fix it, just get a new one on order. Now that you mention it I did see a small piece of rail in the shop a couple weeks ago but I believe it got pitched when I cleaned it out.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    Don't do it. That old vise is probably a good dependable chunk of steel. If you screw it up and end up with a new piece of Chinesium, everyone in the shop is going to curse you. There's a reason that chunk of rail was under the bench.
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  36. Likes N2 Welding, Bruce liked this post
  37. #1746
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    8,271
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    Challenge!


    I mentioned this before but it got lost in the weeds. So, to start the new year out right, I'm issuing a challenge to any and all.....


    Name:  IMG_2154.jpg
Views: 69
Size:  88.9 KBName:  fullsizeoutput_832.jpg
Views: 73
Size:  125.5 KB


    As you can see, there's not much to it. Used for making wire clamps (the predecessor to screw-type hose clamps), these tools are very handy to have around the home and shop. The wire clamps will do things that the more modern hose clamps simply cannot do.

    No rules except that it needs to get the job done and have some forging involved since this is a forging sticky. Use what you've got, make it as nice as you know how, then start thinking about all the ways you can use it!

    If you need some inspiration, I highly recommend watching Advoko's video on how he made his and uses it around his camp. Great guy and a great craftsman, so you should already be watching his videos!

    Looks easy enough to make. What are the materials of the wire and frame of the wooden handle? Stainless steel?
    Lincoln, ESAB, Thermal Dynamics, Victor, Miller, Dewalt, Makita, Kalamzoo. Hand tools, power tools, welding and cutting tools.

  38. Likes Bruce liked this post
  39. #1747
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,828
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I like it... would come in very handy in the field (especially at spraying time) when I never have the right size of hose clamp with me when I need it.
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  40. Likes VaughnT liked this post
  41. #1748
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Don't do it. That old vise is probably a good dependable chunk of steel. If you screw it up and end up with a new piece of Chinesium, everyone in the shop is going to curse you. There's a reason that chunk of rail was under the bench.
    Honestly, and I'm not just saying this. That vise hardly ever gets used. I'd have to go look at the name on it to find out. Besides the point now, I found that scrap piece of rail we had if we ever do decide to make more knives. Appreciate the advice.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  42. Likes whtbaron liked this post
  43. #1749
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,715
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by N2 Welding View Post
    Looks easy enough to make. What are the materials of the wire and frame of the wooden handle? Stainless steel?
    Advoko made his from stainless steel and some scrap wood he had, but you can make them from anything that's handy. The bigger you make it, the bigger the wire it can handle and the more leverage you can put on it to draw everything tight. On the one I forged, I kept it small so it was portable and could get into a tight area, like repairing the hose on a radiator.

    Unlike Advoko's design, I decided to use a bolt as the windlass so I could grab it with a wrench or socket if space was limited. Relying only on hand strength like Advoko's does is perfectly fine for 99% of what I'll ever do, but I thought it was nice to have the option there.

    As for the wire you use... that takes some experimentation. I thought the big ol' spool of bailing wire I have would be perfect for it... but the stuff is very brittle and pulls apart with almost no effort.

    The ClampTite website recommends stainless steel wire for it's strength and durability, and sells spools with sizes from .032" up to .090" depending on what you're trying to do.


    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    I like it... would come in very handy in the field (especially at spraying time) when I never have the right size of hose clamp with me when I need it.
    I gave this one to my nephew for Christmas, but not before I used it to reinforce the split handle on my grandfather's hammer. He'd already reinforced the crack with a small brad, almost hidden in the dark wood and a testament to his craftsmanship, imo. A regular hose clamp would never have worked on the compound curve of a hammer handle, but the wire wrap flows smoothly and bites in all the way around.

    It takes some experimentation to find the right wire to use, though. I was really surprised to see my bailing wire failing like it did.

    The Clamp-Tite company makes a commercially-available version that I really like, but it'd be a bugger to try and mimic without a mill to slice the pipe. https://clamptitetools.com

    For what they cost, making your own is a very attractive proposition. If I thought I'd use mine regularly, like what you have to deal with, I'd probably opt to buy the commercial version. At the very least, I think I'd mimic their design because it looks very streamlined and functional.



    If I was a machinist, I'd definitely want to make my own just to say I did it. Nothing overly complicated, so it'd make a good learner project for folks that need something to kill an hour.


  44. Likes Bruce, whtbaron, N2 Welding, Roert42 liked this post
  45. #1750
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    8,271
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I can buy only so many clamps for $70.00 I wonder how many clamps I can make with $20.00 of SS wire?
    Lincoln, ESAB, Thermal Dynamics, Victor, Miller, Dewalt, Makita, Kalamzoo. Hand tools, power tools, welding and cutting tools.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,642,679,035.19350 seconds with 15 queries