Page 77 of 78 FirstFirst ... 276775767778 LastLast
Results 1,901 to 1,925 of 1945

Thread: Blacksmithing and forging

  1. #1901
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    8,395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    The big Kanca anvil is coming on sale next week for $1400 Cdn.... it's supposed to be drop forged. https://www.princessauto.com/en/165-...t/PA0008927840
    the price certainly is "reasonable" if the quality is there, considering that's about the same price per pound beat up junk is commanding
    :

  2. #1902
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    8,395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Blacksmithing and forging

    deleted effing duplicate post
    Last edited by Lis2323; 07-31-2022 at 10:39 PM.
    :

  3. #1903
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    8,042
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    At least it has some mass... just watching a couple 100 lb'rs at a local auction. A Swedish anvil that was desirable but badly chipped went for $700. A cheap looking London style anvil (poor imitation of a Peter Wright) went for $400. Think my 97 lb'r will do just fine at those prices...
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  4. #1904
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    9,570
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    What do y'all think about a gas bbq grill / forge conversion ?
    Lincoln, ESAB, Thermal Dynamics, Victor, Miller, Dewalt, Makita, Kalamzoo. Hand tools, power tools, welding and cutting tools.

  5. #1905
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by N2 Welding View Post
    What do y'all think about a gas bbq grill / forge conversion ?
    Um.... I'll come back to this tomorrow/later today. Insert beer emoji.

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk

  6. #1906
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,796
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I like those Swedish anvils for their narrow faces. They have the same mass, but opted for a design that's tall and narrow.

    Having a narrow face makes a lot of things easier, plus they look neat.

    For the money, why not grab a chunk of mild steel that's suitably large and put some hard-facing rod on it? Most HF rods come out around 55RC "as welded", and a couple layers of that is more than enough to make a very nice anvil. Might not have the horn, but the horn really isn't necessary for 99% of the stuff people do - especially if you have a shop full of stuff you can bend around.

    This stump anvil has always made me smile. I know I've seen triangular off-cuts in many a scrap pile back when I was traveling, but never thought to grab one up and put hard-facing rod on it. With a little work to blend things together, smoothing out the beads, maybe some sand blasting, you could have a real dandy of an anvil.



    While small, it's got some great lines and wouldn't be hard to replicate in a larger size if you could source a big enough chunk of steel for the main body...

    Love how the top is slumped over. Makes you wonder just how much work the poor lass has seen!



    Just remember, there's nothing about a London Pattern anvil that's a "must have" for a shop. They're handy, but we all have more than enough tools to make the horn pretty redundant. Having a pritchel hole or the hardy hole is very handy for when you need to do things at the anvil, sure, but that's easy enough to fabricate into a home-brew anvil.

    The real challenge is fabricating something that doesn't just look like a bunch of plates cobbled together. If you check out Grindstone250 on Facebook or wherever, you can really appreciate how much work he puts in to blending all his welds so that the repairs look pristine and you're left wondering if the anvil was ever damaged at all. Most every example I've seen where someone welds up an "anvil" for home use, they end up with something that looks like someone welded up a bunch of plates to make an "anvil".

    We can do better. The goal should always be to fool the experts and have them believing you found some ancient artifact from an unknown land.

  7. Likes Lis2323, whtbaron, N2 Welding liked this post
  8. #1907
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    8,042
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by N2 Welding View Post
    What do y'all think about a gas bbq grill / forge conversion ?

    To burn propane? I don't see how you would keep enough heat in with that design. Most of the ones I've seen were just cut up to hold a brake rotor and was used to burn coal. You just end up with a small coal burning open forge.... which can be entirely workable for small projects. I still have a couple coal forges kicking around that I haven't had time to do anything with. Good coal isn't getting any easier to access either...
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  9. #1908
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    8,042
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    "We can do better. The goal should always be to fool the experts and have them believing you found some ancient artifact from an unknown land. "


    Or better yet, get lucky enough to actually find the ancient artifact from an unknown land....
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  10. Likes VaughnT liked this post
  11. #1909
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    9,570
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    To burn propane? I don't see how you would keep enough heat in with that design. Most of the ones I've seen were just cut up to hold a brake rotor and was used to burn coal. You just end up with a small coal burning open forge.... which can be entirely workable for small projects. I still have a couple coal forges kicking around that I haven't had time to do anything with. Good coal isn't getting any easier to access either...
    just kicking the idea around while Iím shedding junk from my backyard. Come to think of it, itís not a good idea. The lid is stainless steel though. Not sure if Iíll ever have a use for thin sheet stainless steel.
    Lincoln, ESAB, Thermal Dynamics, Victor, Miller, Dewalt, Makita, Kalamzoo. Hand tools, power tools, welding and cutting tools.

  12. #1910
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    8,042
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I suppose you could bend it down to a more square/rectangular shape, line it with firebrick and add a homemade burner....
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  13. #1911
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Whipped up a dapping tool to help shape nostrils on the moai nose. Used a grinding ball and a spike from the mines. I ground a flat on the ball, then some grooves hoping the it'll give the weld something to bite into. Those balls are work-hardened like you can't believe. I tapered the end of the spike, set the mig to 200A and had at it. Pretty sure it'll stand up to some hammering. Worked well for the nose but I need so much more practice on where to hold the metal when hammering to get the shaping I want.

    Name:  20220820-092817-01.jpg
Views: 129
Size:  91.9 KB

    Name:  20220820-093931-01.jpg
Views: 132
Size:  209.3 KB

    Name:  20220820-100813-01.jpg
Views: 127
Size:  124.1 KB

    Name:  20220820-110157-01.jpg
Views: 136
Size:  181.7 KB
    Yeswelder MIG-205DS
    (3) Angle Grinders at the Ready
    Just a hobbyist trying to improve

  14. Likes N2 Welding, 52 Ford, VaughnT, whtbaron liked this post
  15. #1912
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Are you open to a bit of constructive criticism? If so...


    Remember that your surface finish can only be as good as the tools your working the steel with. You don't need to polish your tooling, but I suggest taking something like a DA sander (random orbit sander), a belt grinder, and a wire wheel and clean up any rust or pitting on any of the working surfaces. After you do that liberally apply boiled linseed oil. BLO can be applied either "cold" or "hot". I don't mean cold as in COLD, I mean cold as in below the temperature at which it smokes. On certain tools in the shop, I'll wipe it on with a rag and heat the oiled part with a torch to let the oil soak into the surface of the metal (example being blued tooling). If I'm going for a hot finish for something like hooks that are going to be used outside, I let the part get down to, I dunno what temperature exactly, but below glowing (you need to experiment with this to get the temperature right), then wipe the oil on with a rag or if the parts are small enough, I dip them in the oil. It burns it on and leaves a fairly durable finish. I then apply coats of BLO at room temperature, let it sit, then wipe off excess.

    Boiled Linseed Oil is VERY useful in a blacksmithing shop. I recommend wiping all of your wooden handles down with BLO every few months or maybe twice a year. Just a light coat. I do that to mine and I honestly do believe that they're more durable because of it. BLO dries to make a fairly hard coating. When it's hot, it penetrates wood fairly readily. All of my hammers have charred handles (adds durability) and have been thoroughly coated in BLO. When I reapply it, I clamp the hammer head in the vise, then heat the handle up to maybe 200 degrees F, wiping it with a rag soaked in oil, then heat it again, then apply more, then wipe off the excess at the end.

    I wouldn't give a dime for a bottle of poly finish. First thing I do is sand if off of a hammer handle.

    Well, OK, I DO use polyurethane, but not on hand tools. I still don't like polyurethane. Natural finishes just seem a lot nicer to me.

    Edit: BLO is pretty safe in the shop as far as fire hazards go. Get some and TRY to catch it on fire. Pour some out on a rag, wipe it on something in a THICK coating, then hold a torch to it. Seriously, try it.
    Last edited by 52 Ford; 08-22-2022 at 03:15 AM.

  16. Likes Shootr, VaughnT liked this post
  17. #1913
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    8,395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Are you open to a bit of constructive criticism? If so...


    Remember that your surface finish can only be as good as the tools your working the steel with. You don't need to polish your tooling, but I suggest taking something like a DA sander (random orbit sander), a belt grinder, and a wire wheel and clean up any rust or pitting on any of the working surfaces. After you do that liberally apply boiled linseed oil. BLO can be applied either "cold" or "hot". I don't mean cold as in COLD, I mean cold as in below the temperature at which it smokes. On certain tools in the shop, I'll wipe it on with a rag and heat the oiled part with a torch to let the oil soak into the surface of the metal (example being blued tooling). If I'm going for a hot finish for something like hooks that are going to be used outside, I let the part get down to, I dunno what temperature exactly, but below glowing (you need to experiment with this to get the temperature right), then wipe the oil on with a rag or if the parts are small enough, I dip them in the oil. It burns it on and leaves a fairly durable finish. I then apply coats of BLO at room temperature, let it sit, then wipe off excess.

    Boiled Linseed Oil is VERY useful in a blacksmithing shop. I recommend wiping all of your wooden handles down with BLO every few months or maybe twice a year. Just a light coat. I do that to mine and I honestly do believe that they're more durable because of it. BLO dries to make a fairly hard coating. When it's hot, it penetrates wood fairly readily. All of my hammers have charred handles (adds durability) and have been thoroughly coated in BLO. .
    good advice. this is exactly what i have done up until a few weeks ago when i picked up three hammers for $10cdn

    a "friend" suggested mixing a little tung oil with the BLO





    BIG mistake. it resulted in a soft sticky finish that just wouldn't (wooden) harden.



    i will need to strip off the finish and redo
    :

  18. Likes 52 Ford, whtbaron liked this post
  19. #1914
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    good advice. this is exactly what i have done up until a few weeks ago when i picked up three hammers for $10cdn

    a "friend" suggested mixing a little tung oil with the BLO





    BIG mistake. it resulted in a soft sticky finish that just wouldn't (wooden) harden.



    i will need to strip off the finish and redo
    Here's a picture of some of my hammers.

    Notice the lack of shine on the straight pein/cross pein hammer. That one in particular doesn't get used often.

    I've heard that "back in the day" replacement hammer handles came in a bucket or barrel full of linseed oil.

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk

  20. Likes Lis2323, whtbaron liked this post
  21. #1915
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,796
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Boiled Linseed Oil is VERY useful in a blacksmithing shop. I recommend wiping all of your wooden handles down with BLO every few months or maybe twice a year.

    I wouldn't give a dime for a bottle of poly finish. First thing I do is sand if off of a hammer handle.

    Well, OK, I DO use polyurethane, but not on hand tools. I still don't like polyurethane. Natural finishes just seem a lot nicer to me.
    I'll see your BLO and raise you some Pine Tar.

    While everyone talks about BLO like it's the best thing since sliced bread, I've found that Pine Tar is infinitely better. I use Tenda brand from Tractor Supply, but there are others.

    Pine Tar has a natural anti-microbial thing going on so you don't have to worry about molds and whatnot developing - something I've always had to fight with BLO in humid areas.

    Plus the Pine Tar smells infinitely better.

    Sailors of old used to use Pine Tar to waterproof their stuff - including the ships. It's a natural preservative as well as a waterproofing agent. Modern sailors still use Pine Tar, often called Stockholm Tar, on their wood and rope. You can find a lot of recipes out there, but most of them are a blend of pine tar, BLO, and shellac flakes.

    As you note, warm up the wood and apply the tar, then warm it all up and watch as the thinned tar just seeps right into the pores of the wood.

    I like to thin the Pine Tar down with genuine Turpentine because that's also a pine product, and it makes the Tar last longer. The stuff can be pricey, but it's well worth using on all your tool handles, hammers included.

    Best thing ever, imo, and you're keeping a tradition alive.

  22. Likes Lis2323, 52 Ford, whtbaron liked this post
  23. #1916
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hudsons Hope BC
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Rags soaked with linseed oil will spontaneous combust.
    I was boiled linseed oil on some wood in my house threw the rags on my deck and went back to work. I got one of those nagging feelings, went out and checked on rhe rags and sure enough they were smoking and had red glowing embers.

  24. #1917
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by bcguide View Post
    Rags soaked with linseed oil will spontaneous combust.
    I was boiled linseed oil on some wood in my house threw the rags on my deck and went back to work. I got one of those nagging feelings, went out and checked on rhe rags and sure enough they were smoking and had red glowing embers.
    I've never seen that happen. I'm NOT doubting you, though. When I'm done with a rag, I through it out the shop door. I put them in the burn barrel when I leave the shop. Sometimes I just leave them on the forge, if the forge isn't hot.

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk

  25. #1918
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    I'll see your BLO and raise you some Pine Tar.

    While everyone talks about BLO like it's the best thing since sliced bread, I've found that Pine Tar is infinitely better. I use Tenda brand from Tractor Supply, but there are others.

    Pine Tar has a natural anti-microbial thing going on so you don't have to worry about molds and whatnot developing - something I've always had to fight with BLO in humid areas.

    Plus the Pine Tar smells infinitely better.

    Sailors of old used to use Pine Tar to waterproof their stuff - including the ships. It's a natural preservative as well as a waterproofing agent. Modern sailors still use Pine Tar, often called Stockholm Tar, on their wood and rope. You can find a lot of recipes out there, but most of them are a blend of pine tar, BLO, and shellac flakes.

    As you note, warm up the wood and apply the tar, then warm it all up and watch as the thinned tar just seeps right into the pores of the wood.

    I like to thin the Pine Tar down with genuine Turpentine because that's also a pine product, and it makes the Tar last longer. The stuff can be pricey, but it's well worth using on all your tool handles, hammers included.

    Best thing ever, imo, and you're keeping a tradition alive.
    Can't argue with that.

    As long as you don't put polyurethane on your hammer handles!

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk

  26. Likes VaughnT liked this post
  27. #1919
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Are you open to a bit of constructive criticism? If so...


    Remember that your surface finish can only be as good as the tools your working the steel with. You don't need to polish your tooling, but I suggest taking something like a DA sander (random orbit sander), a belt grinder, and a wire wheel and clean up any rust or pitting on any of the working surfaces. After you do that liberally apply boiled linseed oil. BLO can be applied either "cold" or "hot". I don't mean cold as in COLD, I mean cold as in below the temperature at which it smokes. On certain tools in the shop, I'll wipe it on with a rag and heat the oiled part with a torch to let the oil soak into the surface of the metal (example being blued tooling). If I'm going for a hot finish for something like hooks that are going to be used outside, I let the part get down to, I dunno what temperature exactly, but below glowing (you need to experiment with this to get the temperature right), then wipe the oil on with a rag or if the parts are small enough, I dip them in the oil. It burns it on and leaves a fairly durable finish. I then apply coats of BLO at room temperature, let it sit, then wipe off excess.
    Always open to learning!

    The anvil face is very light surface rust, all but wipes off to a ground-smooth surface underneath. Yeah, the ball needs some finishing/smoothing. I was lazy since the nose was to be rough/rustic anyways.

    Good tip on the oil/steel/heat process - thanks!
    Yeswelder MIG-205DS
    (3) Angle Grinders at the Ready
    Just a hobbyist trying to improve

  28. #1920
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    8,395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Blacksmithing and forging

    Polished dollies and striking tools are best if finer details are required







    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    :

  29. Likes VaughnT, 52 Ford, whtbaron liked this post
  30. #1921
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,796
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    As long as you don't put polyurethane on your hammer handles!
    There could be no greater sin, in my estimation. Worse than putting it on the handles is refusing to take it off the handles. I've actually had people tell me they like it -- oddly, they're always new to the smithing trade and think they know better.

    If you want to do something really fun, I developed a very high-tech and expensive way to duplicate the well-worn feeling of an old hammer handle like your grandfather might have had in his collection.

    Take your brand new, poly-coated hammer handle and run it under your 6" wire wheel on the bench grinder. Not only does it strip off the poly in super short order, but the wires pull out a hair's worth of the softer wood. This leaves you with something that feels absolutely divine in the hand and ready to soak up all the good Pine Tar you can slather on.

    I used to sand and scrape the handles, and just thought I'd try the wire wheel one day for no particular reason. Wow, was it a game changer! Not only do the handles have that "look", but the way your hand can kind of sink into all the little divots really gives you a comfortable grip.

    Once a year, or so, I'll run the hammers under the wire wheel just to take off any built up grime or whatever, and then give them a fresh coat of pine tar to freshen things up.

    Don't tell anyone, though. I'm thinking about patenting my high-tech handle treatment.

  31. Likes whtbaron, 52 Ford, Lis2323, N2 Welding liked this post
  32. #1922
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    There could be no greater sin, in my estimation. Worse than putting it on the handles is refusing to take it off the handles. I've actually had people tell me they like it -- oddly, they're always new to the smithing trade and think they know better.

    If you want to do something really fun, I developed a very high-tech and expensive way to duplicate the well-worn feeling of an old hammer handle like your grandfather might have had in his collection.

    Take your brand new, poly-coated hammer handle and run it under your 6" wire wheel on the bench grinder. Not only does it strip off the poly in super short order, but the wires pull out a hair's worth of the softer wood. This leaves you with something that feels absolutely divine in the hand and ready to soak up all the good Pine Tar you can slather on.

    I used to sand and scrape the handles, and just thought I'd try the wire wheel one day for no particular reason. Wow, was it a game changer! Not only do the handles have that "look", but the way your hand can kind of sink into all the little divots really gives you a comfortable grip.

    Once a year, or so, I'll run the hammers under the wire wheel just to take off any built up grime or whatever, and then give them a fresh coat of pine tar to freshen things up.

    Don't tell anyone, though. I'm thinking about patenting my high-tech handle treatment.
    Ohhh the blisters. When I was working in construction I used to hate how slick my hammer would get from sweat.

    I will say, swinging a hammer for a living made it a lot easier getting into blacksmithing!

    Here's a deck I built. Terrible choice of stain. SUPER hot. Either way, where I was going with this, I remember this one in particular because I drove about 650 nails in right at 1 hour. I was installing the joist hangers.

    I believe that deck is 14 by 46 feet. The left 1/3rd of it is 2X8 joist 12" OC. There are a couple beams under there, too. Supposed to be for a hot tub.

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk

  33. Likes whtbaron, VaughnT, Roert42 liked this post
  34. #1923
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Snyder TX
    Posts
    405
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    As a farmer & heavy equipment welder, I always thought hydraulic fluid was the best handle treatment!

  35. Likes 52 Ford, whtbaron, Lis2323 liked this post
  36. #1924
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    8,042
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    LOL.... used oil... I get that s**t on everything...
    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  37. Likes 52 Ford, Lis2323, Roert42 liked this post
  38. #1925
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    LOL.... used oil... I get that s**t on everything...
    Used oil, grease, FREAKIN' SUPER GLUE... anything that you DONT want to get on everything. I was using super glue a month or so ago. Put nitrile gloves on and everything. Got done, put the cap on the glue, cleaned up, took the gloves off, when to put th bottle of glue away... glued my hand to the bottle.

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk

  39. Likes Lis2323, whtbaron liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,664,636,473.41063 seconds with 15 queries