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Thread: Pipe Poll Barn

  1. #51
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    A simple post and beam is easier to build. I uses 2x8 to 2x12 for joints.
    Photo below is one I built.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Morin View Post
    On Not everyone will have these three conditions, so if you don't this post will be more a curiosity or waste of time, please bear with.

    First, not everyone needs or can afford a full slab in their new shop. Still you'd need some basic foundation so here are some thoughts.



    put a plywood box form together that will knock down and can be re-used.



    the form is buried at (eventual grade) so you can cast a block of concrete as a post support. This can be done with a wheel barrow or small mixer to conserve the costs of a ready mix truck, but if they were all buried and ready to go (?) the truck might be a faster answer?



    Of course, no concrete form proposal or discussion is complete without considering a metal, pre-rolled, (maybe) pre-oiled, alternative form; to cast the building post bases. These forms are readily available in some areas of the country, often coinciding with the presence of surplus tubing.

    In each of the post-only concrete images above I'm showing a plate with rebar welded below that is cast into the slab, the base pier or whatever will hold the framing post/columns.



    Here a red steel plate with rebar welded to the bottom is shown with the eventual column base above it. By casting the plate into the concrete and welding the column base to the slightly oversized base plate the foundation bolting routine is skipped.

    Some old Jet rod put in as a down hand, drag fillet, between these two pieces of plate will keep the column in place on most buildings.



    the concrete surface is not shown in these images to make the parts more clear and less confusing in the pictures.



    For those who can afford a slab, and will be using a footer as just a slab edge that is thicker, the same plate is shown cast in place.



    Columns of 3-1/2" pipe would get a little wobbly above 15 feet so double them up. One shop I help build had no 3-1/2" only 2-7/8 (2-1/2" pipe) so the owner put four posts per column - "Just to be sure". He'd only paid 0.50$ a foot; so four pipes per post only cost him $2.00 per foot of column and his welding time. I believe the building is still up and the walls are 25'+ at the eaves.



    To hang a pipe frame door, use the concentric sizes of the pipes and cut hinges and hinge stops.



    Of course there are plenty of other ways to make the doors hinge, but this will allow the entire end wall to open up -if that were needed in your barn?



    To attach purlins that will hold the sheeting, I go to the metal distributor and have them cut hundreds of unequal leg angle 'clip's or L's on their iron worker. They usually keep the cost to 0.50$ per clip or less if you get a couple of hundred. (green angles)

    Do the same with some 3/16" x 4" flat bar (red) and weld them together and drill two to four holes in the red plate. The angles weld to the outer legs, truss tops, and any where else you'll need to have purlins for sheeting.

    Next post
    Cheers,
    Kevin Morin
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by smithdoor; 06-02-2021 at 12:26 AM.

  2. #52
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    Quote Originally Posted by smithdoor View Post
    A simple post and beam is easier to build. I uses 2x8 to 2x12 for joints.
    Photo below is one I built.

    Dave
    No quality Thumbnail ?


  3. #53
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    I have a basic drawings 24 foot span .

    Simple to build I use square tubing so if I want to sides it easy to do later.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by danielplace View Post
    No quality Thumbnail ?


  4. #54
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    My shed is 57X45 feet,, and 22 feet high at the highest point.
    The building is constructed on steel wide flange beams, eleven of them.
    Each beam sets on a 3X3X3 concrete block, I dug the hole square, no wood was used, the concrete was simply poured in the hole.
    (it was easy to calculate how much concrete was needed,,, LOL!!)

    18" long bolts were pushed into the wet concrete,,
    The beams each had a plate welded on, with matching holes for the bolts.

    My neighbor "helped" me, he fanatically made me erect the building square,, the tolerance was always under 1/2" for location of anything he measured.
    I understood his demand for holding tolerance when I went to put the steel siding on,, everything was SUPER easy.

    The building went up in 1999,,
    ALL of my neighbors tell me if there is ever a hurricane, or tornado,, they are coming to my shed,,

    The entire frame was welded with 1/8" 7018, and a Miller Bobcat,, before the siding and roof were installed.



    For scale, that roll up door is 11 feet high, and 18 feet wide.

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  6. #55
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    The largest shop i built for my use was 80 foot span and 16 foot tall but but no photo.
    I used a Victor bug for cutting and welding, 40 foot continues weld then welded the center.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by SweetMK View Post
    My shed is 57X45 feet,, and 22 feet high at the highest point.
    The building is constructed on steel wide flange beams, eleven of them.
    Each beam sets on a 3X3X3 concrete block, I dug the hole square, no wood was used, the concrete was simply poured in the hole.
    (it was easy to calculate how much concrete was needed,,, LOL!!)

    18" long bolts were pushed into the wet concrete,,
    The beams each had a plate welded on, with matching holes for the bolts.

    My neighbor "helped" me, he fanatically made me erect the building square,, the tolerance was always under 1/2" for location of anything he measured.
    I understood his demand for holding tolerance when I went to put the steel siding on,, everything was SUPER easy.

    The building went up in 1999,,
    ALL of my neighbors tell me if there is ever a hurricane, or tornado,, they are coming to my shed,,

    The entire frame was welded with 1/8" 7018, and a Miller Bobcat,, before the siding and roof were installed.



    For scale, that roll up door is 11 feet high, and 18 feet wide.

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  8. #56
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    Forgive me as it's been awhile and everyone wants to know progress, welp I'm here to say I will start my own thread on my build once I get all the pieces together. Got the concrete and drill stem here just was lacking the roofing material and walls. Due to material costs that have exacerbated in these crazy times my ideas have done the same. Let me introduce you to some 20 gauge steel, curved, galvanized and free if you are crazy enough to withstand 20 plus mph winds with temperatures no lower than 90 degrees and no AC to retreat to 16 hrs a day. Might take some engineering to apply it but I can make it work.
    Repurposed 18' grain bins I took 7 of them down and (5) 14' grain bins down with 4 more 18' grain bins to go after my knee heals.Name:  Grain Bin 3.jpg
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  10. #57
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    Quote Originally Posted by _Weldman_ View Post
    Forgive me as it's been awhile and everyone wants to know progress, welp I'm here to say I will start my own thread on my build once I get all the pieces together. Got the concrete and drill stem here just was lacking the roofing material and walls. Due to material costs that have exacerbated in these crazy times my ideas have done the same. Let me introduce you to some 20 gauge steel, curved, galvanized and free if you are crazy enough to withstand 20 plus mph winds with temperatures no lower than 90 degrees and no AC to retreat to 16 hrs a day. Might take some engineering to apply it but I can make it work.
    Repurposed 18' grain bins I took 7 of them down and (5) 14' grain bins down with 4 more 18' grain bins to go after my knee heals.Name:  Grain Bin 3.jpg
Views: 234
Size:  94.4 KBName:  Grain Bin 7.jpg
Views: 235
Size:  99.9 KBName:  Grain Bin 8.jpg
Views: 238
Size:  102.4 KBName:  Loaded1.jpg
Views: 237
Size:  92.1 KB
    I can see your determination and resourcefulness make it work just fine.

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  12. #58
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    Grain bin Gazebo... Had to drive 60 miles to get the pic.Name:  20210619_113013.jpg
Views: 214
Size:  197.8 KB

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  14. #59
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    Quote Originally Posted by 12V71 View Post
    Grain bin Gazebo... Had to drive 60 miles to get the pic.
    I have seen those, I am surprised there is one next to you that close. I was thinking of a 14' pool with one with a 18' one working as a gazebo to go over it and have an option of closing it in, in the winter time. The 4 extra ones I got are Eaton ones and their roof profile I love the best since it curves downwards just doesn't terminate as seen in the picture you posted.

  15. #60
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    I didn't go out of my way to get that pic, we were out tooling around in Superford exploring the country side and I remembered this thread. I had a pic of the gazebo on another phone that, well... met an early demise under a lowboy trailer tire.
    It seems most of the old smaller bins in this area have Butler stenciled on them. Must have had a good dealer for them.

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  17. #61
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    Weldman,
    since the bins are rolled "the hard way" in their forming process- might consider a roof that was rolled or part of cylinder? not sure but seems like 20gauge galvanized would only need to be supported 2 or three places in a span? so the trusses of pipe wouldn't need a continous upper chords and might be made of series of smaller triangle- the upper apex of each one hold a Z strip/purlin and the rolled sheet was support there?

    If you wanted to consider using the rolled sheets as roofing? You might also arrange them like the half cylinder, baked clay, roofing tiles of Mission Style roofs in SW? Using a longer span roll sheet in pairs (say for example) with a shorter rolled piece inverted and spanning between the two longer spans? This would give a roof that was two humps but... would still take advantage of the forming/stiffening already done to the sheeting?

    Another idea might be to see what a 'gothic' (pointed top) arch might look like? Where instead of having the rolled material's ends 1/2 the cylinder horizontal from the top of a wall- instead tip them up on end and let them touch in the middle/centerline of a span- so the section of this idea would look like a pitched roof with curved to chords? Barn roof with curves instead of the two pitch traditional shape.

    (and still) Another idea to kick around is to 'cut' each cone topped cylinder along the vertical axis so you ended up with 1/2 circular 'bay's' with half conic roofing. Then arrange these along the walls so the building's floor plan was 'scalloped' on the wall lines- made up of 1/2 grain bin where 3 bins per wall would give a 54' inside dim. OR a 2x3 half bins would give 36' x 54' walls and side roofs?

    Just some thoughts about designing around rolled forms of material.

    Cheers,
    Kevin Morin
    Kenai, AK

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  19. #62
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    Re: Pipe Poll Barn

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Morin View Post
    Weldman,
    since the bins are rolled "the hard way" in their forming process- might consider a roof that was rolled or part of cylinder? not sure but seems like 20gauge galvanized would only need to be supported 2 or three places in a span? so the trusses of pipe wouldn't need a continous upper chords and might be made of series of smaller triangle- the upper apex of each one hold a Z strip/purlin and the rolled sheet was support there?

    If you wanted to consider using the rolled sheets as roofing? You might also arrange them like the half cylinder, baked clay, roofing tiles of Mission Style roofs in SW? Using a longer span roll sheet in pairs (say for example) with a shorter rolled piece inverted and spanning between the two longer spans? This would give a roof that was two humps but... would still take advantage of the forming/stiffening already done to the sheeting?

    Another idea might be to see what a 'gothic' (pointed top) arch might look like? Where instead of having the rolled material's ends 1/2 the cylinder horizontal from the top of a wall- instead tip them up on end and let them touch in the middle/centerline of a span- so the section of this idea would look like a pitched roof with curved to chords? Barn roof with curves instead of the two pitch traditional shape.

    (and still) Another idea to kick around is to 'cut' each cone topped cylinder along the vertical axis so you ended up with 1/2 circular 'bay's' with half conic roofing. Then arrange these along the walls so the building's floor plan was 'scalloped' on the wall lines- made up of 1/2 grain bin where 3 bins per wall would give a 54' inside dim. OR a 2x3 half bins would give 36' x 54' walls and side roofs?

    Just some thoughts about designing around rolled forms of material.

    Cheers,
    Kevin Morin
    Kenai, AK

    That's what these are for is roof pieces and maybe go with wall pieces, it's undecided on that front. Here is what I have conjured up so far on my drawings. I'm sure things will change with time such as framing but overall this is a rough draft. Since there is no transition pieces to be bought from the roof to wall seems I provided a 3 inch overhang with the roof. The upper center roof will act as a ridge vent for summer time with doors to open on the sides.Name:  Pole barn.jpg
Views: 130
Size:  51.9 KB
    Last edited by _Weldman_; 06-21-2021 at 09:19 AM.

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