Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 96

Thread: Are you always standing on the job?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Are you always standing on the job?

    Hi, guys. I'm a college student considering a new career path. Before I get into the question in the title, I'd like to give a bit of background of myself, so you guys can better assess whether welding would suit someone like me.

    I've been well on my way to get my electrical engineering degree, but I'm getting sick of the general education requirements. I've aced all of my math classes up to multivariable calculus, and aced all the general science (physics and chemistry) classes; but I have no interest in studying completely unrelated topics to engineering. When it comes to writing and oral communication, I feel like I'm already ahead of most of my peers. All of my prior English writing essays last semester had received an A from the instructor, so I don't see why I need to take an additional semester of writing for a career where I'm not going to do much writing. (It's not like I'm going to do research and write research papers.) I don't need to learn more history than what I already know, nor take some useless liberal arts classes.

    I'm good with hand-eye coordination and motor skills. In all the computer games I've played, I had acquired a level of skill that is among the best players of those games; so I don't think working with my hands welding will be too difficult a task to master.

    Here comes the dilemma. I can't stand on my feet constantly for longer than 2 hours before experiencing some major discomfort, and after 8 hours, they are invariably in a great amount of pain. I've tried different shoes and insoles. Nothing seems to work. I want to know if you guys are required to be on your feet constantly. If I can switch between being on my feet, and not, by a time ratio of about 1:1, it would be very manageable.

    If I do choose to go into welding, my plan is to gain 1 to 2 years of work experience after taking welding courses at a local community college, and then get commercial diving certified so I can weld underwater (I imagine it's much easier on my feet to work underwater than on land).

    I would also like to know if I'm physically strong enough for most jobs. I'm 5'4", weighing 135 lbs. I can run 5km (3.1 miles) in 26 minutes, but don't have much upper body strength, as I can barely do 15 push-ups. Since I'm a small guy, I wonder if I would have the strength to work comfortably with heavy equipment and whatnot for hours on end. Your inputs will be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    159
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    How long do you have left in college to finish you bachelor's degree? sounds like not long.

    I ask because if its a year or two and you have spent a ton of money already, dont quit now, suck it up. An engineering degree of any kind can bring in big bucks.

    One other thing I was told about getting a degree was that it shows you can accomplish a long term goal. A lot of jobs require a "4 year degree" but dont actually say in what(I have a degree in drinking beer with a masters in drinking Captain Morgan spiced rum). This is more of a "can this person accomplish a long term goal" type of a requirement.

    As far as the gen-ed type classes that suck, yea they suck. The key is to find classes that satisfy the requirements that dont suck. Say you can pick from 10 different literature classes. Pick the one that seems most interesting to you. I took a literature class on war's. We read and reported on books written during and about wars. I read a lot of great non-fiction books during that class. Find stuff like that that will keep you interested. I had to take 2 physical education class. I took golf(free large bucket of range balls and 18 holes 2x a week) and weight lifting(which I already did anyway). I have a B.S. in Aviation and a M.S. in Safety. I was also a ****ty high school student that dropped out and got a GED.
    Last edited by rjacobs; 06-29-2015 at 04:12 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by rjacobs View Post
    How long do you have left in college to finish you bachelor's degree? sounds like not long.

    I ask because if its a year or two and you have spent a ton of money already, dont quit now, suck it up. An engineering degree of any kind can bring in big bucks.

    One other thing I was told about getting a degree was that it shows you can accomplish a long term goal. A lot of jobs require a "4 year degree" but dont actually say in what(I have a degree in drinking beer with a masters in drinking Captain Morgan spiced rum). This is more of a "can this person accomplish a long term goal" type of a requirement.

    As far as the gen-ed type classes that suck, yea they suck. The key is to find classes that satisfy the requirements that dont suck. Say you can pick from 10 different literature classes. Pick the one that seems most interesting to you. I took a literature class on war's. We read and reported on books written during and about wars. I read a lot of great non-fiction books during that class. Find stuff like that that will keep you interested. I had to take 2 physical education class. I took golf(free large bucket of range balls and 18 holes 2x a week) and weight lifting(which I already did anyway). I have a B.S. in Aviation and a M.S. in Safety. I was also a ****ty high school student that dropped out and got a GED.
    I understand that any engineering degree can be lucrative, but I've noticed that quite a few engr degree holders are currently unemployed, so even such a degree is not a guarantee for raking in money right out of university. I have about 4 years more of college to get a bachelor's, because I want to take it slow (engineering study workload can be a b*tch) and still have a lot of GE classes (god I hate them) to finish. My contention with GE is that many of those classes are just indoctrination programs rather than real education, taught by liberal instructors whose political ideology and attitudes I want nothing to do with. I did consider trying to pick out GE classes that would suck the least, but my issue is that they are still off-topic to engineering, and I don't to put effort into "studying" (more like memorizing) and doing stuff that won't be relevant whatsoever to my future.

    I haven't spent any money so far, because in my state and due to my financial background, I am able to have tuition fees completely waived at my community college. However, once I transfer to a university, I might have to take on some loans. If I instead decide to go into welding, I won't have to go to university, and can get certified from a community college and start work after a couple years of school.

    I have an interest in welding, because I like the idea of building things with my own hands, and have a healthy interest in metallurgy. Plus, the sparks and pretty lights are cool.

    Did you need to spend a lot of time on your feet in your career history as a welder? That's a very important point for me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    6,178
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Yes, long days crawling around and up on your feet, squeezing into tight places and climbing on things to do repair. I'm not saying you can't land a job sitting in a chair and tig welding all day, but I wouldn't count on it. It is not a trade that is forgiving on the body, that's why it falls under the physically taxing trades. What is wrong with your feet by the way?
    I hate being bi-polar it's awsome




    My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by weldermike View Post
    What is wrong with your feet by the way?
    Really wish I knew. I don't have the money to get it checked out a by a podiatrist, nor is that a guarantee to bring about a solution.

    Squeezing into tight spaces shouldn't be an issue; I'm short and skinny! haha Climbing should be easy, unless I have to carry a ton of gear. If for every 45 minutes that I have to stand I can sit for 15 minutes, I will be satisfied.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    China
    Posts
    1,063
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Sometimes I get to use a bucket. Heh. I use to have feet pain problems till I bought me a pair of timberland pro series anti fatigue boots. So comfy, and my legs no longer feel like crap when I get home even after 12 hour shifts.
    Miller Maxstar 200 SD
    Piperliner #10 Gold

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by smilexelectric View Post
    Sometimes I get to use a bucket. Heh. I use to have feet pain problems till I bought me a pair of timberland pro series anti fatigue boots. So comfy, and my legs no longer feel like crap when I get home even after 12 hour shifts.
    Yea I've read a lot of testimonies from people getting miraculous results with certain shoes, but then I try them and don't get anywhere near the same result. My feet would still hurt with the supposedly super comfortably work shoes that cost upwards of $80 per pair.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Panama City Beach, FL
    Posts
    138
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    My opinion - just suck it up man.

    I have a bachelors in mechanical engineering with a masters in engineering management yet still work with my hands most days, still weld/machine a couple times a month for work, and 3d model and design the rest of the days.

    School and your career are what you make it so when you say
    I understand that any engineering degree can be lucrative, but I've noticed that quite a few engr degree holders are currently unemployed, so even such a degree is not a guarantee for raking in money right out of university
    that doesn't mean anything to anyone really. Nothing in life is guaranteed and all you can do is give it everything you've got to make your career what you want it to be. I invested most of my time while at the university being a part of the Formula and Baja SAE teams. I designed, machined, welded, raced, broke and raced again for years. That experience got me to where I am today and made me the engineer that I am today.

    I have about 4 years more of college to get a bachelor's, because I want to take it slow (engineering study workload can be a b*tch) and still have a lot of GE classes (god I hate them) to finish
    . If you are as smart as you say you are and get the grades that you do then you should be able to get your degree in 5 years easy. I worked 15-20 hours a week, spent 50 hours a week at the SAE shop building the cars and studying then had classes on top of that. I had "no life" according to my peers but that's that I wanted and I had multiple job offers right out of school in 2009 when the recession was BAD. Your work ethic and grades sell you on the first job, after that grades don't matter and it comes down to recommendations and your work ethic. Life is mostly who you know and not what you know anyways.

    My contention with GE is that many of those classes are just indoctrination programs rather than real education, taught by liberal instructors whose political ideology and attitudes I want nothing to do with. I did consider trying to pick out GE classes that would suck the least, but my issue is that they are still off-topic to engineering, and I don't to put effort into "studying" (more like memorizing) and doing stuff that won't be relevant whatsoever to my future.
    This is because the schools aren't looking after you, they are looking after their dollars and pennies. No other option, just do it and get it over with. Besides in all the bull**** classes are where the girls are anyways, if you suck it up and follow through with the electrical degree the ladies are going to be few and far between and the ones that are there usually look like Gollum.

    So my two cents man, deal with it and get it over with. College was the best time of my life and I still get dirty all the time. If you really like welding that much and get your degree look into a job with Miller, ESAB or Lincoln.
    Mechanical Engineer

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    ...Shoulder of Orion...
    Posts
    3,509
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    "Discovery is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought" - Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Orchard, WA.
    Posts
    10,270
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    In construction you just never know what youíll be doing. In the morning you might be making UT, or x-ray quality welds, and in the afternoon doing this. You just have to take the good with the bad!
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Donít pay any attention to me
    Iím just a hobbyist!

    Carl

    Dynasty 300
    V350-Pro w/pulse
    SG Spool gun
    1937 IdealArc-300
    PowerArc 200ST
    3 SA-200s
    Vantage 400





  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by BLUE2KSS View Post
    My opinion - just suck it up man.

    I have a bachelors in mechanical engineering with a masters in engineering management yet still work with my hands most days, still weld/machine a couple times a month for work, and 3d model and design the rest of the days.

    School and your career are what you make it so when you say that doesn't mean anything to anyone really. Nothing in life is guaranteed and all you can do is give it everything you've got to make your career what you want it to be. I invested most of my time while at the university being a part of the Formula and Baja SAE teams. I designed, machined, welded, raced, broke and raced again for years. That experience got me to where I am today and made me the engineer that I am today.

    . If you are as smart as you say you are and get the grades that you do then you should be able to get your degree in 5 years easy. I worked 15-20 hours a week, spent 50 hours a week at the SAE shop building the cars and studying then had classes on top of that. I had "no life" according to my peers but that's that I wanted and I had multiple job offers right out of school in 2009 when the recession was BAD. Your work ethic and grades sell you on the first job, after that grades don't matter and it comes down to recommendations and your work ethic. Life is mostly who you know and not what you know anyways.

    This is because the schools aren't looking after you, they are looking after their dollars and pennies. No other option, just do it and get it over with. Besides in all the bull**** classes are where the girls are anyways, if you suck it up and follow through with the electrical degree the ladies are going to be few and far between and the ones that are there usually look like Gollum.

    So my two cents man, deal with it and get it over with. College was the best time of my life and I still get dirty all the time. If you really like welding that much and get your degree look into a job with Miller, ESAB or Lincoln.
    I'm also 28 years old. I took a few years off of college due to personal obligations. Do you think a 32-year-old fresh EE graduate would have much opportunity in the labor market? I'm genuinely curious, because I think most employers are much more interested in hiring the younger graduates.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by CEP View Post
    In construction you just never know what you’ll be doing. In the morning you might be making UT, or x-ray quality welds, and in the afternoon doing this. You just have to take the good with the bad!
    That looks exciting, but probably very bad for my feet.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Orchard, WA.
    Posts
    10,270
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by tigonridge View Post
    That looks exciting
    Running a rivet buster gets really old in about 30-seconds! I gave up on welding, and went into rigging full time. Iíd much rather rig than weld.
    Donít pay any attention to me
    Iím just a hobbyist!

    Carl

    Dynasty 300
    V350-Pro w/pulse
    SG Spool gun
    1937 IdealArc-300
    PowerArc 200ST
    3 SA-200s
    Vantage 400





  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    4,197
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    School doesn't have a clinic to get checked. Won't insurance cover your Dr. Visit. I ASSume you have insurance since you are I'm college and get financial assistance. Seems like you need to get checked out .

    Get your degree. Especially since it is free. F R E E. It might be very difficult to find free college education if you let this go. Earn a scholarship for the university.

    I stand much and Crawl, lift, drag, lean ...
    8:2

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    6,178
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    How were you raised, what did you do, what are your hobbies? This tells a lot about a persons nature. Most kids I see today have zero motorskills and hardly any dexterity unless it's a video game. When they think they are working hard, in reality they are not, not one bit. Most likely this is not the trade for you. It pays great, but takes balls, daredevils and talent that comes from growing up a certain way that really hasn't been seen in years. It's probably not for you to be honest. If sore feet is your biggest issue you will never make it. You gotta be built like a bull to make it here, even if you are a little squirt. Just being honest.
    I hate being bi-polar it's awsome




    My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Houston Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    4,061
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Not much sitting going on in these trades and its hard on the body.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Sounds like I need to continue with my EE degree. Sigh...

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Orchard, WA.
    Posts
    10,270
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by weldermike View Post
    How were you raised, what did you do, what are your hobbies? This tells a lot about a persons nature. Most kids I see today have zero motorskills and hardly any dexterity unless it's a video game. When they think they are working hard, in reality they are not, not one bit. Most likely this is not the trade for you. It pays great, but takes balls, daredevils and talent that comes from growing up a certain way that really hasn't been seen in years. It's probably not for you to be honest. If sore feet is your biggest issue you will never make it. You gotta be built like a bull to make it here, even if you are a little squirt. Just being honest.
    Welp, that about sums it up. 100% truth!
    Donít pay any attention to me
    Iím just a hobbyist!

    Carl

    Dynasty 300
    V350-Pro w/pulse
    SG Spool gun
    1937 IdealArc-300
    PowerArc 200ST
    3 SA-200s
    Vantage 400





  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sebeka and Bemidji MN
    Posts
    14,831
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Yep - definitely finish your degree.

    +2 Weldermike nailed it.

    At any time after you finish your degree you can still decide to start welding - but sure as hell finish it.

    Edit: I forgot to add - video game dexterity means nothing.
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
    MM210
    Dialarc
    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    western new york
    Posts
    658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    As far as sore feet go... eat some cherries. I know it sounds crazy, but it really works. Fresh or dried, it doesn't matter, just eat a bunch of them (like a pound at least). Foot pain can often be attributed to Gout, and cherries are the best medicine. They somehow improve blood circulation, and make foot pain a thing of the past.
    IAMAW Local 330
    Airco 300 AC/DC Heliwelder
    Airco Dip-Pak 200 with Profax spool gun
    Powr-Kraft AC225
    Everlast PowerArc 200st
    Buffalo Forge No.21 drill press
    Speedglas 9100xx
    Airco, Oxweld, Purox, Victor torches
    Lincoln Ranger 8

  21. #21
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Barre Town, VT
    Posts
    871
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    I'm an EE major in my last semester and I just have to ask have you done any EE classes yet? The reason I ask is it sounds like you haven't welded before and other than math and science you haven't done any EE stuff yet. Welding isn't like video games and metal is heavy. I think it is a bad idea to give up on something you've barely started for something you've never tried because classes are boring and sparks are cool. I'm sorry if this sound harsh but college is hard and welding is hard. This is life. You could always do what I do and do both.
    My "collection":

    Homemade Stick Welder
    Victor O/A Torch
    AC 225
    Ideal Arc 250

    HF 90 Amp Flux Core
    HF Mig 170
    Solar 2020 Plasma Cutter
    Power i-Mig 140E
    Harris O/A torch
    HF Dual Mig 131
    140ST
    Alpha Tig 200x

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    In A Nice Comfy Chair
    Posts
    18,764
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    The only time I sit during the working day is when I have to bench TIG...other than that on my feet all day long.

    Sometimes even TIG is done on one foot...




    I do however have a nice old sled track I stand on when operating my lathe that keeps me off the concrete floor and it really helps the feet and back.

    But like others stated...
    This ain't no job for a whimp.



    ...zap!


    I am not completely insane..
    Some parts are missing

    Professional Driver on a closed course....
    Do not attempt.

    Just because I'm a dumbass don't mean that you can be too.
    So DON'T try any of this **** l do at home.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Stay in school.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    san antonio texas area
    Posts
    136
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    OP
    Getting through all those GE classes demonstrates to employers that you have discipline and can accomplish things that interest you and don't interest you. They are necessary in the growing process. It is sometimes more about the growing process than the sheepskin.
    Syncrowave 210
    HH140
    Victor O/A

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4,228
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are you always standing on the job?

    Quote Originally Posted by wnywelder View Post
    As far as sore feet go... eat some cherries. I know it sounds crazy, but it really works. Fresh or dried, it doesn't matter, just eat a bunch of them (like a pound at least). Foot pain can often be attributed to Gout, and cherries are the best medicine. They somehow improve blood circulation, and make foot pain a thing of the past.
    Good to know about the cherries, thanks. I wonder if it will help the artheritis in my finger? I get gout from eating oatmeal everyday. Standing helps the ache go away after sitting in the truck on my way to work. I havnt eaten oatmeal for a while so no gout at the moment.

    Like rjacobs said,"its a test to see if you can finish". Stay in school. My two cents, get stronger. Im so used to standing, I have a hard time sitting to TIG.

    Zap mentioned standing on a rubber mat (sled belt). This is a good idea for concrete floors. Wood floors are more forgiving but standing/walking on cement all day is hard even if your used to it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,627,259,177.42089 seconds with 12 queries