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Thread: Car restoration

  1. #1
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    Car restoration

    Hi Guys,

    I have a car restoration to do and was wondering if you guys could give me some advise on which welding equipment to buy. I will be removing and replacing body panels and was wondering if a tig welder would be good for the job or a mig. My budget for the welder is US$900. what good used brand could i get for that money.

  2. #2
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    Re: Car restoration

    Get a GAS Mig any you will be all set..

    NO FLUXCORE FOR BODYWORK!!!!!



    ..zap!


    I am not completely insane..
    Some parts are missing

    Professional Driver on a closed course....
    Do not attempt.

    Just because I'm a dumbass don't mean that you can be too.
    So DON'T try any of this **** l do at home.

  3. #3
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    Re: Car restoration

    Well, you're restoration is on about the same pace as a lot of people - you been asking this off-and-on since 2009

    For $900 you can buy a lot of machine - have you narrowed down the ones you want to choose from over the years?

    My vote is gas shielded mig as well.
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
    MM210
    Dialarc
    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

  4. #4
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    Re: Car restoration

    With a MIG and a bucket of bondo you repair a car. It's back in working order, but not a recreation of how it left the factory.

    With a O/A welder and countless hours of panel beating to get everything to the exact shape it is supposed to have without bondo, you restore cars.

  5. #5
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    Re: Car restoration

    Oh! yes from 2009. The resto has been on and off, as for mig welders still a bit up in the air on that. If i can get a used miller in good working condition for $900 then ok, if not, then i was thinking about a eastwood mig 250.

  6. #6
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    Re: Car restoration

    Thanks for the advice.

  7. #7
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    Re: Car restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by badbug View Post
    Oh! yes from 2009. The resto has been on and off, as for mig welders still a bit up in the air on that. If i can get a used miller in good working condition for $900 then ok, if not, then i was thinking about a eastwood mig 250.
    In full size models, the millermatic 210 is the smallest "big" one. I have one and they weld excellent.

    Used they generally go for $900 and under around here.

    I would not buy any eastwood welder.

    The new Miller mm211 and the Lincoln 210mp are small box versions that have all the power you would need.

    Also, the Lincoln is a mig/tig/stick machine.

    I'm guilty too on restorations, my 77 f150 has been waiting since the 90's for me to work on it...
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
    MM210
    Dialarc
    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

  8. #8
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    Re: Car restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by badbug View Post
    Thanks for the advice.
    hobart 210 mvp, 800+ shipping or get it at tractor supply for a bit more. Your local welding shop should have a small c25 bottle you can buy for 100 dollars or an 80 cf bot for 150-200 (filled!)

    only other things you will need are wire, a welding mask, and gloves.

  9. #9
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    Re: Car restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaDave View Post
    In full size models, the millermatic 210 is the smallest "big" one. I have one and they weld excellent.:
    The site still has a classified section.

  10. #10
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    Re: Car restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by badbug View Post
    The site still has a classified section.
    Not trying to sell mine.
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
    MM210
    Dialarc
    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

  11. #11
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    Re: Car restoration

    I'll post my standard thread with tons of info from a master
    Absorb everything that member MP&C posts...

    http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...ad.php?t=53534
    MillerMatic 252, HTP 221 w/cooler, Hypertherm PM45, Lincoln IdealArc 250 AC/DC

    "I'd like to believe as many true things and as few false things as possible"

  12. #12
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    Re: Car restoration

    Thanks for the link.

  13. #13
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    Re: Car restoration

    G-son.Are you implying that a Oxy acetylene welder would be best for my job. If that's what you are saying, i already have the welder, i just need bottles
    Last edited by badbug; 11-01-2015 at 11:34 AM.

  14. #14
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    Re: Car restoration

    I would think that MIG, used in the fashion shown in the link I provided, would create a much smaller HAZ.
    MillerMatic 252, HTP 221 w/cooler, Hypertherm PM45, Lincoln IdealArc 250 AC/DC

    "I'd like to believe as many true things and as few false things as possible"

  15. #15
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    Re: Car restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by badbug View Post
    G-son.Are you implying that a Oxy acetylene welder would be best for my job. If that's what you are saying, i already have the welder, i just need bottles
    Implying... well... O/A produces soft welds, i.e. a weld that allows you to use hammer & dolly to shape and stretch the metal into the perfect shape. Downside it that O/A warps the metal more, so no matter how good your fitup is you will have warped metal to take care of.
    MIG produces harder welds that can not be worked with hammer & dolly. Basically, you are stuck with whatever shape it has after welding and grinding, if it isn't perfect (and it probably isn't) your only option is to mud it over with bondo or similar products.

    To sum it up, welding in patches with MIG followed by covering it all with bondo is the quick and cheap method most people use. O/A followed by hammering until as flat and unwarped as possible (and then possibly a thin coat of bondo) is the slower and harder to learn method a few people use when they want a top quality result mimicking what was originally there as good as possible, as when restoring very expensive old cars.
    On the other hand, if a full panel is to be spot welded in as many are from the factory, a O/A welder would probably not be the best choice. Diffrent welders for diffrent welds...

    I can't tell you how you should work on your car, and I have no idea what it's worth, how much work you are prepared to put into it, how badly you want it to be as perfect as possible or how long you want it to last. Most of the very expensive cars that get the expensive "O/A restoration" in a high end shop today were cheap cars not so long ago, and as such most of them were repaired with cheap methods just to keep them rolling. Since noone would make expensive high end repairs on cheap cars the quick and dirty repairs actually kept the cars alive until now when the value motivates a complete high end restoration, basically saving the cars from getting scrapped long ago. There's nothing wrong with doing things the quicker, cheaper, easier way... as long as you know what results to expect from it.

    Some people doing alot of high end work to be inspired by. Go ahead and register on those forums too so you can ask their advice, they always help!
    http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/index.php
    http://www.allmetalshaping.com/

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