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Thread: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

  1. #26
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by rod.bruce.90 View Post
    One thing to remember is if you are crossing state lines as an electrician you most likely will have to be licensed in each state. Some states may reciprocate but others wont. Also an electrician generally has to take continuing education classes to stay current on their license and NEC code changes. An electrician also has to start at the bottom as an apprentice doing all the grunt work, climbing in attics and crawl spaces so your first few years are dirty, hard and hot.
    The state line thing is a big obstacle. In the late eighties a VT company I subbed for had a product far ahead of the competition. We had 700 hours a year work commuting into Mass. The licensing board, inspectors, union members, (both electricians, and teamsters) did all they could to oppose. A few stopped just short of violence. The license took six months for what they describe as reciprocal licensing. They used every trick in the book. Mail never arrived, certified mail arrived one day late for the board to act on it, The hand written $110. fee mysteriously turned into $140 owed, (rejected for lack of $30.00). Ultimately, they sent the Master Electrician's License with a hand written note: "This does not entitle the holder to perform hands on work in the State of Massachusetts. licensed master electricians are limited to a supervisory activity in Massachusetts. Hands on work requires a Journeyman's license." They then denied me a journeyman's license, as the agreement is reciprocal, and I didn't hold a Journeyman's license in VT. Ultimately I had to get dual licensing in VT, (an expensive, but otherwise simple process).

    Are you saying after 47 years I shouldn't have to go into attics, and crawl spaces???
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  2. #27
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    States need to simply adopt NEC and NFPA like they have for boilers...Simply standardize stuff...Our skilled non immigrant workers need to be able to trans this whole country if the stats and feds expect them to pay big taxes, then allow them to work whole country-where work exists, but is spotty.

    Every one has gotten SO protective of their jobs, but we get almost nuthin done today.

  3. #28
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Electrical licensing is a dam joke, as if the NEC changes from border to border, city to city. In ny there is no reciprocal license. You have to hire a monkey from a local shop even if your a union contractor working out of town. Anyway to the original question, in our local the rate for electrician journeymen is about 34 an hour and the benefit package is around 16 bucks. That is for commercial/industrial. Residential work really sucks imo, unless you like attics and basements lol. I prefer lifts and pipe to spinning romex.

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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Forget about running conduit and jerking romex, yea those guys are called Electricians also. Go to school and learn controls, PLC's, AC and DC drives, process instrumentation etc. Believe me, I manage a wood products plant and we can't find those guys with those skills. If you have those skills and a little experience you can write you own ticket.

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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Wow, I didn't expect so many people to be willing to help me. Thanks! I would join the Navy, but seeing as how I can't get into the Army or Marines due to hospitalization when I was about 16 (broken hearted punk problems) I can't imagine that they would let me in. I don't really know what to say other than thanks for all of the information and wisdom. I needed it!

  6. #31
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Leroy View Post
    Forget about running conduit and jerking romex, yea those guys are called Electricians also. Go to school and learn controls, PLC's, AC and DC drives, process instrumentation etc. Believe me, I manage a wood products plant and we can't find those guys with those skills. If you have those skills and a little experience you can write you own ticket.
    ^^^^This^^^^
    From a central controls operator standpoint this is what I see of electricians, and the ones most marketable are more than conduit installers and wire pullers.

  7. #32
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    You could always take up farming, long hours, low pay be your own boss, btw he is a jackass to work for. But on the upside I'm sure we will always be in demand because I don't see anyone quitting eating any time soon. Mike

  8. #33
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Leroy View Post
    Forget about running conduit and jerking romex, yea those guys are called Electricians also. Go to school and learn controls, PLC's, AC and DC drives, process instrumentation etc. Believe me, I manage a wood products plant and we can't find those guys with those skills. If you have those skills and a little experience you can write you own ticket.
    Yep, this ^
    I'm an union Journeyman electrician. I can do nearly all the work covered my my license: residential, commercial, industrial, and telecom. I can bend conduit pretty accurately, which can be an art form in itself. What makes me more employable is that I have knowledge and skills in areas that many other electricians find difficult. I have lots of experience doing fire alarm work, which is a specialty. I've done lots of control work, another specialty. The job I just got was a foreman call by name doing Life Safety for a contractor at Intel's Ronler Acres campus. They needed someone who could perform and manage specialty control work. Fortunately, that's me. In our local, journeyman rate is $40.22 an hour and as a foreman I get 10% more.

    Welding is a really fun hobby for me, but I wouldn't much care to do it as a full time job. The only way I could see that coming true would be if I was pipe fitter doing orbital welding on stainless process piping at a chip fab.

    Like, what if we start using wireless tech and electricians become obsolete? We will still be welding. Just a thought
    Seriously, if we start using more wireless tech than we do now, there will be even more jobs for electricians. All that wireless crap runs on electricity. For example, cell phones are connected wirelessly to their network, but to have that network, you need cell towers. Those require electricians to build. Data networks? Data server farms require a lot of electricians to build. New houses have more wires in them now than they did 20 years ago and the older houses continue to be updated. The average office space is remodeled every 2 years. Point is, Electricians will never become obsolete.

  9. #34
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    everything will be 3D printed soon, from hamburgers to ranch hand bumpers
    Last edited by Jimmy_pop; 03-19-2016 at 03:50 AM.

  10. #35
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    In 1975 I was the apprentice when with my father we used a mile of cable to wire a single family home. It was a 10,000 square foot mansion. These days a 2500 square foot modest home uses a mile of cable. People expect many more conveniences now than they did 40 years ago. Once we used one light in each room. If people wanted more light, they used a table lamp, or desk lamp. These days, ten fixed hard wired lights are common. Security, and security lighting are a big thing. One house had 31 motion sensors, and had a total of 12 places in the house where they could be overridden and turned on. The husband refused to discuss what the wife was asking for; "Just do what she asks." When he figured out the outdoor lighting cost, he flipped out, furious with me for allowing this extreme overkill.

    The scale of electrical work in new single family homes is at least tenfold what it was in my youth. Industrial is at least tenfold, as is commercial space. The only thing downscaled here in VT is dairy farms. Danby, the next town to me went from 70 shipping dairy farms in 1960 to 3 in 2016.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  11. #36
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by Tyler Howell View Post
    Hi, I'm sorry if this is the wrong place to post but I can't find much decent information. I'm considering two careers at the moment--Electrician and Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder--and I'm trying to get some advice as to which one to choose. My community college offers an associate's degree in either field, and that is the route that I'm going to take. I'm just curious about benefits, union stuff, salary, how hard it is on your body, health hazards, etc. Pretty much this: If you were young/healthy and had nothing holding you down which of the two would you prefer? Also, neither has to be permanent, and I plan to save most of the money that I make regardless so that I can invest in something else in the future. Thanks, and sorry if this is an unwelcome post.

    Edit: One other thing is that I'm concerned about the future. Like, what if we start using wireless tech and electricians become obsolete? We will still be welding. Just a thought.
    You could major in one degree but take the extra classes for the other and petition for a dual degree. It would take an extra couple of semesters but would be well worth it if you have the desire. I took welding technology and numerical control technology concurrently and the basics qualified for both. My parents were very supportive of it and was well worth it in my mind. Community College was cheaper than dirt in the late 70's and early 80's. Paid for it all myself working part time jobs in the evening while living at home.
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  12. #37
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Leroy View Post
    Forget about running conduit and jerking romex, yea those guys are called Electricians also. Go to school and learn controls, PLC's, AC and DC drives, process instrumentation etc. Believe me, I manage a wood products plant and we can't find those guys with those skills. If you have those skills and a little experience you can write you own ticket.
    Leroy is right, as a 35 year commercial/industrial electrician I'll tell you that controls, motors, automation ect. is the way to go. Fixing down machines in mills or anywhere is about the best. Of course you don't start out as "the go to guy" but you'll get there.

  13. #38
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Something to consider is that welding is primarily a hand skill. Electrical work involves considerably more brain power. The real question is if you can be successful in a more science/math environment or you are more suited to the manual arts. In most cases all you need to enter a welding training program is high school graduation. For electrical training most of the time the post high school/college programs require math and science as a prerequisite. As mentioned electrical work is not just pulling wires and running conduit. Electrical work ranges from control systems running on a couple of volts to power systems using thousands of volts.

  14. #39
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Ty, you've had plenty of great information offered, so I'll move back to basics and provide some questions for Ty to ask himself.

    Do you have techie inclinations? Are you a computer builder, programmer, gamer, CAD guy? Do you fiddle with them for fun or are you a hands on mechanical guy? I'm asking you to sort out if you're going to grow into a low voltage controls electrical guy? That's been mentioned as one of the biggest paying and most sought after skill set in the electrical trades.

    I've been an oil and gas controls and automation contractor since '90 so I have a little knowledge in the subject. Both instrument techs and electrical apprentices come in three categories. Pipe and Bracket Electrical guys don't do much control programming they're very close to the pipe trades in welding and in instrumentation they're somewhat limited to valve repair and other more or less mechanical work. Both groups are one part of the trade.

    Next are the electricians who pull wire, terminate and calibrate devices in the field and these correlate the the middle group of instrument techs who do similar work. This group could have both the industrial and commercial electrical groups, and in the industrial there would be lines and transmission, power /motors and lights, and then toward controls or low voltage.

    Last are those in both groups who understand programming well enough to work directly on the controls systems regardless of the system being controlled- these guys work with engineers and are paid the most. But the last group are those who are most interested in the math, logic, and details involved in controls theory and not as focused on the pipe, hardware, power and construction parts of the trades.

    Ty, do you see yourself interested in the high end? or the more mechanical trade side? Good NEW! Most guys in stage 3 of their trades started in stage 1 and 'grew' so you may find that in yourself as well- few people start at the top of their trades.

    Next, in welding is the same series of questions.
    (I've had welders work for me as well as worked in pipe offshore, various fab shops and had my own boat building bidness and designed and built pressure rated ASME B31.3 control sub-assemblies in my own company)

    Beginning welding even for someone with a pipe cert might be grinding stringers for someone else while they look you over? But at the high end of the trade may be running an NC welding cell unit in some factory? So like electrical work there's a spread in the trade.

    Yes, there is some romance to being the traveling rock star who moves from job to job- but that seriously depends on your hands. I'm pointing out that several people have noted this decision on your part is not as open to everyone as you may think? The level of skill in a hot bluegrass band is not purely practice and that is true of pipe welding too. If you don't have hands- somewhat a gift from God- then you're going to struggle to deliver the work, and you'll never keep up on the firing line of a pipe crew- if you ever got there?

    So I'm just summarizing a bit what's been said. There are levels to the trades, where each trade has people that work from primary skill and mechanical/bodily actions to those who work more with their minds -all levels trained in the same basics of that trade. Farther, the farther you go in pipe welding them more skill you'd need to have 'born-n-bred' to keep going. The farther you go in tech end of all the trades the more you're working with your brain power than your body power.

    Last, the brain usually wears out less and at much lower rate than the body. So if you're young and still bullet proof (I fondly recall those days) then body work and skill (guitar hero) seems more attractive. But if you've got some miles on your back ( bending over and pulling the stringer up a joint in the ditch at 20deg F in some little tent,your feet in mud, your back wet- when you're push'in 50 won't be near as much fun as it was at 25!).... then the brain power goals look more appealing.

    One of the Good Lord's most frustrating aspects of our lives is to ask us to make good decisions about life-long forks in the road while we're young! What is it that makes a good decision? Well experience is about the most effective contribution- so we're asked to make life-long choices when we have the least amount of the most important element of good decisions! Experience.

    I'd ask myself if I was techie or a mechanic and go from there- regardless if you have the hands to weld- both trades have a more mechanical level and a more advance level so each one could be interesting challenging and fulfilling as a career.

    I've enjoyed being both, approaching the upper ends in controls, automation, programming, NC and automated or semi-automated welding process are all work I've done. Since I have decent hands but not "steelsurgeon's" or ZtFab's ( and the rest of the Z-men! on here) and since I could program 'OK' but not like the code-jocks I could hire ; my solution was to be a contractor. I had to know about all these processes to lead the company, and to help troubleshoot when we all fell on our noses. But I wasn't the best welder, programmer, or controls electrician/technician; but I sure got a clear picture that if you don't like what you're doing- if you're not willing to work long hours to get 'there'- find something else as soon as you can.

    All I've said here has been said above by others more informed than me. I just tried to correlate the tread into a rough summary for you.

    One last thing. Some guys like being home every night, other are good to "gypsy-around". I did plenty to be able to stay home and not work offshore in the Cook Inlet, camp jobs here in Alaska, or the North Slope, even when it meant I'd have been paid more. That's another matter to consider.

    Best of fortune to you.. Remember; if you get a few steps down the wrong path - it's time to turn around as soon as possible- don't wait! - correct your errors the minute you realize them- if possible!!

    Cheers,
    Kevin Morin
    Kenai, AK

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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Morin View Post
    Ty, you've had plenty of great information offered, so I'll move back to basics and provide some questions for Ty to ask himself.

    Do you have techie inclinations? Are you a computer builder, programmer, gamer, CAD guy? Do you fiddle with them for fun or are you a hands on mechanical guy? I'm asking you to sort out if you're going to grow into a low voltage controls electrical guy? That's been mentioned as one of the biggest paying and most sought after skill set in the electrical trades.

    I've been an oil and gas controls and automation contractor since '90 so I have a little knowledge in the subject. Both instrument techs and electrical apprentices come in three categories. Pipe and Bracket Electrical guys don't do much control programming they're very close to the pipe trades in welding and in instrumentation they're somewhat limited to valve repair and other more or less mechanical work. Both groups are one part of the trade.

    Next are the electricians who pull wire, terminate and calibrate devices in the field and these correlate the the middle group of instrument techs who do similar work. This group could have both the industrial and commercial electrical groups, and in the industrial there would be lines and transmission, power /motors and lights, and then toward controls or low voltage.

    Last are those in both groups who understand programming well enough to work directly on the controls systems regardless of the system being controlled- these guys work with engineers and are paid the most. But the last group are those who are most interested in the math, logic, and details involved in controls theory and not as focused on the pipe, hardware, power and construction parts of the trades.

    Ty, do you see yourself interested in the high end? or the more mechanical trade side? Good NEW! Most guys in stage 3 of their trades started in stage 1 and 'grew' so you may find that in yourself as well- few people start at the top of their trades.

    Next, in welding is the same series of questions.
    (I've had welders work for me as well as worked in pipe offshore, various fab shops and had my own boat building bidness and designed and built pressure rated ASME B31.3 control sub-assemblies in my own company)

    Beginning welding even for someone with a pipe cert might be grinding stringers for someone else while they look you over? But at the high end of the trade may be running an NC welding cell unit in some factory? So like electrical work there's a spread in the trade.

    Yes, there is some romance to being the traveling rock star who moves from job to job- but that seriously depends on your hands. I'm pointing out that several people have noted this decision on your part is not as open to everyone as you may think? The level of skill in a hot bluegrass band is not purely practice and that is true of pipe welding too. If you don't have hands- somewhat a gift from God- then you're going to struggle to deliver the work, and you'll never keep up on the firing line of a pipe crew- if you ever got there?

    So I'm just summarizing a bit what's been said. There are levels to the trades, where each trade has people that work from primary skill and mechanical/bodily actions to those who work more with their minds -all levels trained in the same basics of that trade. Farther, the farther you go in pipe welding them more skill you'd need to have 'born-n-bred' to keep going. The farther you go in tech end of all the trades the more you're working with your brain power than your body power.

    Last, the brain usually wears out less and at much lower rate than the body. So if you're young and still bullet proof (I fondly recall those days) then body work and skill (guitar hero) seems more attractive. But if you've got some miles on your back ( bending over and pulling the stringer up a joint in the ditch at 20deg F in some little tent,your feet in mud, your back wet- when you're push'in 50 won't be near as much fun as it was at 25!).... then the brain power goals look more appealing.

    One of the Good Lord's most frustrating aspects of our lives is to ask us to make good decisions about life-long forks in the road while we're young! What is it that makes a good decision? Well experience is about the most effective contribution- so we're asked to make life-long choices when we have the least amount of the most important element of good decisions! Experience.

    I'd ask myself if I was techie or a mechanic and go from there- regardless if you have the hands to weld- both trades have a more mechanical level and a more advance level so each one could be interesting challenging and fulfilling as a career.

    I've enjoyed being both, approaching the upper ends in controls, automation, programming, NC and automated or semi-automated welding process are all work I've done. Since I have decent hands but not "steelsurgeon's" or ZtFab's ( and the rest of the Z-men! on here) and since I could program 'OK' but not like the code-jocks I could hire ; my solution was to be a contractor. I had to know about all these processes to lead the company, and to help troubleshoot when we all fell on our noses. But I wasn't the best welder, programmer, or controls electrician/technician; but I sure got a clear picture that if you don't like what you're doing- if you're not willing to work long hours to get 'there'- find something else as soon as you can.

    All I've said here has been said above by others more informed than me. I just tried to correlate the tread into a rough summary for you.

    One last thing. Some guys like being home every night, other are good to "gypsy-around". I did plenty to be able to stay home and not work offshore in the Cook Inlet, camp jobs here in Alaska, or the North Slope, even when it meant I'd have been paid more. That's another matter to consider.

    Best of fortune to you.. Remember; if you get a few steps down the wrong path - it's time to turn around as soon as possible- don't wait! - correct your errors the minute you realize them- if possible!!

    Cheers,
    Kevin Morin
    Kenai, AK


    1. I have ALWAYS been a techie kind of guy. I love using my mind to do things, and I enjoy computers a lot. My Electrical degree will train me in controls.

    2. I want to do the more technical side of things. It's not that I'm against labor, but I'm a thinker and I like to "figure and allow" as my dad would say... sounds like industrial is where it's at for me. Since I will be given training for it woudl it be possible to start learning my journeyman as an industrial?

    3. I have awesome hand-eye coordination, but my hands are fairly small for a man.. and I'm 5'6".. would this be an advantage or disadvantage in welding? I do enjoy using my hands, but I DON'T like the fear of messing up and being ridiculed by an inspector.

    Thanks for the advice man. I really appreciate all the effort that you put into it. I would say more but I'm short on time this morning. God bless.

  16. #41
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Which job would you like to do more? That's the one you should go for, IMHO.'
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by FishPlate View Post
    Which job would you like to do more? That's the one you should go for, IMHO.'

    That's a pretty hard question to answer lol, but I think that I would prefer electrical.

  18. #43
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    from a 53 year old jack of all trades
    If I were you I would look at instrumentation
    power engineerin (great trade and if you keep working our way up in 4th class to 1st class the pay a job security just gets better. )
    protection and controls technologist
    X-ray and lab tech
    the tick is to find a job that interests you and pays the most with the least wear and tear on your body and the most time off to enjoy the money you make.

  19. #44
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Ty, instrumentation has been mentioned, just above, so I'm going to spend a few lines trying to make the difference out in instrumentation and electrical careers and end by showing they often end up in the same place.

    Instrumentation basics are to teach the relationship between 'processes' or any aggregated system of equipment with some type of 'control' method built in. The thermostat in the house senses the room heat- there is a 'set-point' and when the room it above or below that measured and compared set point- the furnace's water valve is opened a pump started and hot water circulated until the thermostat 'sees'/senses/detects the heat is in range of the set-point and turns the 'add heat' controls off.

    Automatic controls- in a very simplified form we use every day. (model based on hot water baseboard home heating for simplicity).

    The trade instrumentation used to involved mechanical clock timing or mechanical movement devices call instruments- there were actually no real electrons flowing in those early systems. The name is no longer really well defined but the study focuses in devices that control- devices that convey the information- devices that 'decide' and-send back control signals to devices that change pressure, level, temperature and flow (we're skipping all analytical for simplicity).

    On the electrical side, you don't really begin with low voltage like you do in instrumentation. You most often get circuit theory and then some AC and work toward controls (common apex of these two trades) but you spend more time in the power distribution and less in controls to begin.

    The electrical trade has more power, motors and lights than would be present in instrumentation education. However when done- when the controls are the last stage of the system to learn- both electrical and instrument trades now rely on people who can program (many times its merely configuration not programming) and for whom logic is logically applied to process systems.

    So as was advised by bcguide, instrumentation has the goal in mind that you'd go to programming, controls, sequencing and the related work as the apex of your field.

    In the industrial electrical side- you won't have that beginning assumption since there aren't that many electrical to instrument conversion people as there are purely instrument careers that end up at the apex.

    There are some electricians you end up doing this work and that is fact, both from common experience and my own personal work hiring from both groups.

    One very important decision to make is based on research. Let's say you live at the tip of Florida so that Washington State is the far away. They still have one of the US' best schools for instrumentation. Perry Institute, Yakima WA, has a series of programs that I can highly recommend having hired plenty of their students and made a very pleasant profit hosting them as they ascended their career ladders.

    But the local college has a degree program you can afford it much more easily? What is the difference between the local college and the for profit, and EXtremely pricey Perry Tech Institute programs? Quality and credibility, opportunity (related to cost is proportional).

    IF someone calls any knowledgeable instrument contractor West of the Mississipppi and says they're a Perry grad, they can get an interview in my experience. I've hired them blind and paid to move them and more often than not got my money back and some.

    Any Perry Program graduate has plenty of job offers -BEfore- they graduate. So, go to any program you're considering and ask to see the graduate hire stats. NExt, get on the phone and interview the companies that hire those grads and see what they started as? Would they hire again- what are the rates for new hires...

    An electrical degree may not offer you what you think? Now it's time to find out what the syllabus of each program is? How that related to the trade work you prefer? and any advice from those in that trade?

    What will a McD's look like in a few years? You will drive up to a screen and see a person's likeness filmed 5k mi away, and make your order pay by card and sit for no more than 31 sec.s at the chute where your order will come out. Then you'll look in the bag, hit confirm on your steering wheel and drive on. Or the car will drive on if you said "Ok, its fine" outloud.

    What will keep that automated ultra sterile concrete box serving 'fast food' a technician who has both electrical and instrumentation controls background and has extensive robotic training to interact with the non-human system maintenance 'bots.

    This will happen in the next few years, since there are already prototypes running, and either electrical or instrumentation careers that work in this field will not be eliminate from the work force. Most other skilled tasks will be , and that included welding of almost anything- down to job shop work.

    So, Ty, the closer you work with the computer systems that host our ever increasingly automated world- the longer you'll last.

    Cheers,
    Kevin Morin
    Kenai, AK

  20. #45
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Kevin advice is spot on. A friend took an instrument course at a local to him collage and never did get work in instrumention became a electrion instead.
    way back when I did power engineering it touched on instrumentation and I thought it would be an interesting trade so I called BCIT to get some info on their courses and was told that 80% of the students were hired out of the class, not one of the power engineers in my class were hired out of the class. most of us were 6 months to a year before we found work
    So do your research before you put your time and money into it

  21. #46
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Good hand/eye coordination is relative. Being able to TIG weld equally well with both hands while looking in a mirror to get at the backside of an x-ray pipe weld is what other welders would consider good hand eye coordination. Being able to run a fillet weld on plate not so much.

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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Kevin took the time to post great info.

    .....But I don't know what is more frustrating today-A coin op coffee machine that forgets to first drop the cup before it squirts the coffee, or the idiot ratchet fem behind the walk up sales counter on her cell phone sporting $100 fingernail job and seriously goofy hairdo.

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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Quote Originally Posted by Welder Dave View Post
    Good hand/eye coordination is relative. Being able to TIG weld equally well with both hands while looking in a mirror to get at the backside of an x-ray pipe weld is what other welders would consider good hand eye coordination. Being able to run a fillet weld on plate not so much.
    Welder Dave I have seen exactly that done by shipyard welder suspended in rope sling welding very thick walled copper/nickle HP piping on nuclear submarines. They had to bend their filler rods every few inches of bead to clear the overhead just maybe two inches above the piping....And you can believe every inch of weld on nuc subs are X-rayed.

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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    Nowadays it is really hard to find good specialist in this field. Therefore, I manage a company and I was looking for an experimented electrician and it was a real challenge. When I hire an electrician, I don’t really care about his licenses and stuff like this. Of course, he must have a license, however he must have some skills too. I found such an expert at specialized company. If you are looking for an electrician or a person to solve your electrical problems, you could ask these guys https://bates-electric.com/locations/st-louis-mo/. I do really recommend them, cause they got me out of trouble lots of times.

  25. #50
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    Re: Travelling Industrial Pipe Welder vs Electrician

    One thing about Electricians.... They can really fry SPAM.

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