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Thread: Advice Please

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Richmond, Virginia
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    Re: Advice Please

    Quote Originally Posted by derekpfeiffer View Post
    This is why I insist on customers always stopping by my shop before I build a project for them! ...
    Same here. And I show them my gun, machete and hammer collections. Along with shrunken heads of former or would-be customers.
    "USMCPOP" First-born son: KIA Iraq 1/26/05
    Syncrowave 250 w/ Coolmate 3
    Dialarc 250, Idealarc 250
    SP-175 +
    Firepower TIG 160S (gave the TA 161 STL to the son)
    Lincwelder AC180C (1952)
    Victor & Smith O/A torches
    Miller spot welder

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    Re: Advice Please

    Friend, I myself would drop the job without another word to him and move on to next. Those materials were leftovers anyway and still very useable.

    When he calls asking WTF? Tell him you don't have the time to screw around with his small job and confusion. Suggest he find someone else.

    Next job get it on paper with signature and material costs up front....Move on

  3. #28
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    Re: Advice Please

    Wornout, you obviously didn't make a living as a salesman, as every business owner needs to be. As a long-time salesman, I learned to love almost every one of my azz-hole customers. They are like wayward children that you didn't drown back when you could get away with it. You are stuck with them. Make hay.
    "USMCPOP" First-born son: KIA Iraq 1/26/05
    Syncrowave 250 w/ Coolmate 3
    Dialarc 250, Idealarc 250
    SP-175 +
    Firepower TIG 160S (gave the TA 161 STL to the son)
    Lincwelder AC180C (1952)
    Victor & Smith O/A torches
    Miller spot welder

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    75
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    Re: Advice Please

    I'm from kansas and have often relied on a handshake. It's never bitten me in the ***. People I don't know I write up a formal document and have them sign before I do any work. But as said before I'll show examples before they sign on the line. Terms are always different based on the job. Some people have more $ and prefer to pay up front so all they gotta do is wait for it or pick it up. I'm speaking about everything from fab work to construction and carpentry

    It's simple. get a mud motor. shoot ducks in the face.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    Mount Tabor VT
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    Re: Advice Please

    I've made a living working for hundreds of bosses since 1969. I've had a few dozen paper contracts. All the others have been verbal. There have been a few times I didn't get paid. Usually it's because the customer can't pay. When someone insists on a written contract I become very suspicious. These are people either wanting something for nothing, or terrified I can't be trusted. In either case I don't want to work for this customer. Take the time to learn what the customer wants. Discuss the obstacles of doing it their way. In my work, often the customer's wants violate safety laws. These issues must be addressed. Just yesterday, an industrial customer insisted that burying conduit very shallow across a log yard was the best for him. He knew the rules. Not following rules had made him rich. I could say convincing him to bury it deep wasted two hours. I see it as saving me hours of misery repairing it again in the worst winter weather.

    There are customers who view transactions as conflict, they have to win. Try to identify these customers before you do business. For them you are so busy you can't do their work. The majority want to pay a low price for good work. Make them understand that while you aren't the cheapest, you are the best value. I too get frustrated with how much time I lose communicating with my customer. I force myself to understand that part of my job is educating my customer.

    Your customer wants value. They pay for expertise they don't have. Give enough information that they can tell quality from crap. You will reap the rewards.

    My best customer informed me of a decision he made involving very large sums of his money. I was troubled. I went to him, apologized for sticking my nose into his business, but stated my concerns. A week later I learned my time had been wasted, he was going through with it. Two weeks later he reconsidered, at considerable expense, he backed out of what I believe was a big mistake. Later he approached me and said; "I'm not real smart, so I surround myself with people who are. I want to thank you for stopping me from making a big mistake." In my world you don't get many atta boys. On the rare occasion, they feel good.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

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