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Thread: The last word on 7014?

  1. #1
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    The last word on 7014?

    After reading several web sites and searching this and other forums, I still haven't come up with a definitive conclusion about 7014, at least from the perspective of an AC-only welder. I have read comments like:

    "I would never use 7014 for any weld where strength was important."

    "7014 is just as strong as 7018/7018AC, and doesn't need to be stored in an oven."

    "7014 is a medium-penetration rod, the same as 7018."

    "7014 is a light-penetration rod, used mostly with sheet metal."

    "I've used 7014 on our farm equipment for many years, and have never had a weld failure."

    Both Lincoln and Hobart's web sites say 7014 is "ideal for applications requiring light penetration and faster travel speeds."

    Miller's site doesn't even mention it: "Common electrodes used for general work include 6010, 6011, 6013, 7018 and 7024, each of which has specific properties."

    Lincoln's site says 7014 is good for "Maintenance and repair welding, sheet metal and fillet welds, and heavy sections."

    It would be useful, especially for us beginners, to hear from some of the more knowledgeable members of this forum on the subject, even if they disagree, and maybe we can reach some consensus. One gets the impression that 7014 is some kind of "orphan child" of the electrode world.

  2. #2
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    I would like to hear some experts chime in on 7014 too! I use 1/16 rods for sheet metal work and would love to know what welders that make a living off the work think of it.
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    When I worked for a compactor company we used 7014 to weld the sheets of 1/8" to the frames, faster than MIG, and cheap like the owner.
    Disclaimer; "I am just an a$$hole welder, don't take it personally ."

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    I am a "Hobby Welder", and very aware of my limitations. I like 7014: because it is a "Drag Rod", there is almost no skill required on my part to use it, It builds a very smooth bead, it fills gaps nicely, it leaves behind a slag coating that chips very easily. Another big, in my opinion, plus; 7014 does not need a rod oven to properly store it.
    I offer three choices: Good, Fast, & Cheap. You may pick two.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    I'll be interested to follow this thread, as well.

    Seems like you never hear much about 7014 – only 7018.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    70XX is what 90% of the engineers drawings say.

    So 7014-7018-7024 would all qualify.

    Some project specifications will further define other requirements like Charpy V Notch requirements among other requirements


    For the home hobby crafter. 7018 might not be the best choice just because of the skills needed to run it. Can a weld made with non CVN 7018 work as well as one made with 7024-7016-7014-70XX YES definitively YES. Can you make that weld is the bigger more important question.

    As for quality of deposited weld material, they all have the one thing in common they are all 70,000 tensile electrode rods. the XX14-18-16-24-...... and on designate position and coating type and polarity requirements.


    I do suggest that you all go to Lincoln Electrics web site or ESAB and get the knowledge form the manufacture and not from morons spouting off in a forum. ME INCLUDED.

    The only motivation ESAB Lincoln Hobart have is to sell you more rod and equipment. The more you know about their product the more likely you'll be to buy their product. THEY ALL HAVE INFORMATION available for free and customer service persons to talk you through selecting rod.

    SO you will not get the definitive answer here in a forum you will get it from the manufacture of the rod if you select a manufacture worthy of your money.
    Last edited by Fat Bastard; 08-24-2011 at 03:58 PM.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    I love 7014. Imake my foreman always have a box of it on the job. Not only is it my first, second and third choice for welding bridging, I can also hotrod metal if I have to, which is often. I carry 7018 and 7014 in my rod pouch.

    7014 has the same tensile strength per square inch as any other 70xx series rod. It is however more brittle - I can tell you this from many experiences. for instance a tack weld made with 7014, especially on something where we will be moving the other end, is a poor choice. A similar tack weld with 7018 is much more flexible.

    7014 is a "fill-freeze" rod. It has a decent deposition rate, but is not a fast fill rod. The slag also solidifies quickly, but is not a fast-freeze rod. So for me that makes filling gaps easy. I also like it for welding thin deck because it does not penetrate as quickly as 6022 which sometimes just blows the sheet away instead of welding it. Also, for welding in pour stop, which is usually galvanized sheet metal in and around holes in the floor to stop concrete, it penetrates that galvanize better than 7018. Restrike is easy as well.

    on edit: there is no definitive rod out there man. I can do everything I like to do with 7108, or 6011, or whatever they give me. Some guys dont like 7014 at all. You really need to work with all of them, and understand how, for YOU, it works, and the applications for which it is appropriate.

    7024 is on the way out in the structural world. Vulcraft/NuCor prohibits the use of it to weld their joists. Need a jet rod? 7028 is the way to go.
    Last edited by tenpins; 08-24-2011 at 04:26 PM.
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    You have gotten some good advice here, but I'll add my 2 cents as well. If you are limited to an AC stick welder, 7014 is one of the better choices out there. They are easy to strike and easy to run, as the coating can be dragged on the base metal. They run well even on welders with low open-circuit voltage. They are strong enough for most non-critical applications, and critical applications are best not attempted by beginners.

    That being said, all rods have their uses- there would not be as many different electrodes as there are if there was one "best for everything" rod. You should try to become proficient with 6011, 6013, and 7018 as well (use 7018AC on an AC welder). If you are welding out-of-position (that is on vertical or overhead joints), you will find that 6011 and 7018 work a lot better than 7014.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    I never seen 7014 on a job site, so I'd never ran any, until a couple months ago. After reading post after post about it, I decided to give it a go. I thought it was child's play.
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Cool demo CEP. Way cool.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    How are samples prepared for those root and face bends? Cut strips with the bandsaw and then polished with a belt sander or something?

    Mikel

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    That's pretty much it in a nut shell.
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Thanks for those picts CEP! I'll save them for a thread I want to do in October on bends when I have the free time and access to more of the 3/8" material.

    Nice job on the bend demo as well. I may steal those picts as well when I do the thread.
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Cool bend tester.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    I'm planning to weld 3/8" chain hooks onto the bucket of my tractor's front end loader. These are pretty common; you hook a chain through them so you can use the loader to pick up heavy objects such as large logs, tree stumps, etc. which may weigh upwards of 1,000 pounds. It seems universal to attach these chain hooks with 7018. But all the "experts" here are shouting, "no, don't use 7018 if you don't keep it in an oven!!!" Would you use 7014? Here is a picture of one such installation:
    http://tinyurl.com/3negt86
    Last edited by Ruark; 08-25-2011 at 10:44 AM.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Instead of welding the hook to the bucket I suggest you weld an eye to the bucket and connect the hook via clevis and pin.

    Good hooks are hardened and welding them will negativity effect the the hook material.

    This welding can all be accomplished with any E(R)70XX

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bastard View Post
    Cool demo CEP. Way cool.
    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by DSW View Post
    Thanks for those picts CEP! I'll save them for a thread I want to do in October on bends when I have the free time and access to more of the 3/8" material.

    Nice job on the bend demo as well. I may steal those picts as well when I do the thread.
    You're welcome!


    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    Cool bend tester.
    Thanks!
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Quote Originally Posted by tenpins View Post
    I love 7014. Imake my foreman always have a box of it on the job. Not only is it my first, second and third choice for welding bridging, I can also hotrod metal if I have to, which is often. I carry 7018 and 7014 in my rod pouch.

    7014 has the same tensile strength per square inch as any other 70xx series rod. It is however more brittle - I can tell you this from many experiences. for instance a tack weld made with 7014, especially on something where we will be moving the other end, is a poor choice. A similar tack weld with 7018 is much more flexible.

    7014 is a "fill-freeze" rod. It has a decent deposition rate, but is not a fast fill rod. The slag also solidifies quickly, but is not a fast-freeze rod. So for me that makes filling gaps easy. I also like it for welding thin deck because it does not penetrate as quickly as 6022 which sometimes just blows the sheet away instead of welding it. Also, for welding in pour stop, which is usually galvanized sheet metal in and around holes in the floor to stop concrete, it penetrates that galvanize better than 7018. Restrike is easy as well.

    on edit: there is no definitive rod out there man. I can do everything I like to do with 7108, or 6011, or whatever they give me. Some guys dont like 7014 at all. You really need to work with all of them, and understand how, for YOU, it works, and the applications for which it is appropriate.

    7024 is on the way out in the structural world. Vulcraft/NuCor prohibits the use of it to weld their joists. Need a jet rod? 7028 is the way to go.
    7024 is NOT on its way out.
    7024 is used in the horizontal or flat position. The"2" of the 7024.
    It is a iron powder rod and it makes a large fillet weld which is good for many things.
    It makes a good fillet weld around the deck of a boat where you want a joint that is easy to clean ,smooth , thereby reducing uneven weld surface that can start corrosion if the paint is not smooth. 7024 deposits a lot of metal.

    Many people on this forum need to take the time to find out what different rods are used for and what the numbers mean.

    You need a POCKET WELDING GUIDE. You can get them on Ebay. It fits in your pocket and can answer many simple welding questions.
    The pocket welding guide can tell you what the numbers of the welding rod mean, type of flux (light or heavy deposition), depth of penetration, tensile strength, How to run the rod.
    Last edited by Donald Branscom; 08-26-2011 at 06:24 AM.
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    I for one hate 7014 there is nothing I like about it, I for one learned to weld using 7018 and can use it in all positions. All we have at work is 7014 and the boss uses it because anyone can strike a arc with it. I for one wouldnt want "anyone" welding a sign thats 60' tall that would kill someone if the weld were to fail.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Branscom View Post
    7024 is NOT on its way out.
    7024 is used in the horizontal or flat position. The"2" of the 7024.
    It is a iron powder rod and it makes a large fillet weld which is good for many things.
    It makes a good fillet weld around the deck of a boat where you want a joint that is easy to clean ,smooth , thereby reducing uneven weld surface that can start corrosion if the paint is not smooth. 7024 deposits a lot of metal.

    Many people on this forum need to take the time to find out what different rods are used for and what the numbers mean.

    You need a POCKET WELDING GUIDE. You can get them on Ebay. It fits in your pocket and can answer many simple welding questions.
    The pocket welding guide can tell you what the numbers of the welding rod mean, type of flux (light or heavy deposition), depth of penetration, tensile strength, How to run the rod.
    I have used the 7024 rod think it was 1/4", it burned hot as hell but filled in a hurry. I used it to repair the belly on a gantry crane and had a large area to fill (2" thick plate with 45 degree bevel for 100%) ran a 7018 root and filled with the 7024 after the material was preheated. If I ever needed to use a fill rod and had a lot of welding to do it would be my first pick.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Quote Originally Posted by thelbz View Post
    I for one hate 7014 there is nothing I like about it, I for one learned to weld using 7018 and can use it in all positions. All we have at work is 7014 and the boss uses it because anyone can strike a arc with it. I for one wouldnt want "anyone" welding a sign thats 60' tall that would kill someone if the weld were to fail.
    You are making foolish, brash and ignorant comments.
    They are not relevant to the discussion, relevant to 7014, nor relevant to general welding practices.


    Welds today don't typically fail "joints" do.

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    CEP, very nice demo and post!
    ~~~~
    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bastard View Post
    Instead of welding the hook to the bucket I suggest you weld an eye to the bucket and connect the hook via clevis and pin.

    Good hooks are hardened and welding them will negativity effect the the hook material.

    This welding can all be accomplished with any E(R)70XX
    I like FB's answer here.
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bastard View Post
    Instead of welding the hook to the bucket I suggest you weld an eye to the bucket and connect the hook via clevis and pin.
    Good hooks are hardened and welding them will negativity effect the the hook material.
    This welding can all be accomplished with any E(R)70XX
    Thanks, but I think I'll go with welding them directly to the bucket. That's the standard way to do it, as it has been done with tens of thousands of FELs out there. The one in that picturre is a classic example. In fact, you can buy hooks (as I have) called weld-on hooks, shaped specifically for being welded in this manner.

    I'm planning to use 7014, although a sizable number of people out there will shudder in horror at the idea of using anything besides 7018(AC).

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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Branscom View Post
    You need a POCKET WELDING GUIDE. You can get them on Ebay. It fits in your pocket and can answer many simple welding questions.
    The pocket welding guide can tell you what the numbers of the welding rod mean, type of flux (light or heavy deposition), depth of penetration, tensile strength, How to run the rod.
    I can't find the thread, but someone here posted a link to get that pocket guide from Hobart direct. I can't even find it on their site. Does anyone remember that post?
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    Re: The last word on 7014?

    7014 is a iron powder 6013 good for sheet metal and poor fit up . We use it on my side job to tack detail on structural. At harris we use 8018 c 3 as we do a lot of 588 work a terriable tack rod. E 7024 is a low hydrogen fast fill Jet rod good for structural.

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