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Thread: Class D fires

  1. #26
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    Re: Class D fires

    In the Navy, if you have a Class D fire on the flight deck, the proper procedure is just to jettison it overboard. They don't even bother trying to put it out. Even if it's a whole aircraft. Over the side it goes.

  2. #27
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    Re: Class D fires

    I bet that's a load of paperwork when that goes down
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  3. #28
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    Re: Class D fires

    Probably just like any other Class A mishap. Better to lose one plane than damage the flight deck from heat and completely shut down operations on a deployed carrier.

  4. #29
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    Re: Class D fires

    Quote Originally Posted by Baloo2327 View Post
    I have a question. My Dad is building an Aluminum jet boat, just a small 11 ft, but because he is just learning to weld aluminum he is smoothing down all of his welds with a flapper disc grinder. No steel being down in the shop right now, and I probably wont now until everything is cleaned up. My question is do I have to watch out for anything right now while he is just working on Aluminum only?
    He should be fine, Aluminum isn't really all that easy to ignite and even when it's in a fine powdered form like you would use for thermite it still takes a magnesium fuse to get it going.

  5. #30
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    Re: Class D fires

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael ray View Post
    I bet that's a load of paperwork when that goes down
    No where near the paper work for when it burns through one deck to the deck below, then the deck below that, and the next one too, till it finally hits the outer hull plate.

  6. #31
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    Re: Class D fires

    Are aircraft fires pretty common on deck? I've heard of a couple but never really got to see first hand the aftermath of one.
    Blue stock- shopmaster, a/bp330, maxstar 150stl, maxstar 210, hf251, Tbolt ac/dc, mm 135
    Red stock-ranger 8, weldanpower 150, idealarc 250 ac/dc
    Esab plasma, Victor OA set, Air products ac/dc 400 amp
    It's me flipped in snow..doughnut fail

  7. #32
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    Re: Class D fires

    Quote Originally Posted by 76GMC1500 View Post
    A bucket of sand works too.
    DRY sand only !

  8. #33
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    Re: Class D fires

    Now if you were running PTFE and aluminum against the same belt sander and could managed to collect up a few lbs of that dust mix well, there's probably some entertainment value to be had from that. At least as far as a really bright short duration light went. Mixing that with some iron oxide might get you more of a reaction than you were planning on.

  9. #34
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    Re: Class D fires

    Quote Originally Posted by Bistineau View Post
    No where near the paper work for when it burns through one deck to the deck below, then the deck below that, and the next one too, till it finally hits the outer hull plate.
    Nothing for it at that point but to insure that Condition Zebra is set and then just hope for the best.

    Do you remember the engine room fire on the LST, USS Fresno when it was tied up to the Mole Pier at 32nd street naval base, SD in 1977? I was on ASR-21 at the time tied up right next to it and it was my duty night so I ended up as a relief #2 noszzelman for part of it. I was barely 20 years old and way in over my head.

  10. #35
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    Re: Class D fires

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    Man those are spendy! Don't really understand why since there main component is just sodium chloride. Got to wonder how much of that cost is to cover the manufacturer's liability insurance premiums?

    As best I can recall our procedure for dealing with Class D fires was "try and get some heavy wood under it and some sand on top of it".
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael ray View Post
    I'm going to invest in one of those...even though I don't play with extra dangerous metals. Never know
    Save your pennies, they are expensive. I keep a 5 gal bucket of play sand around. I can see the graphite powder being expensive, but the salt ones? I guess like HT said, if it doesn't work for whatever operator error caused it, I bet the manufacturer is paying for a BIG insurance policy to defend themselves.

    Quote Originally Posted by Insaneride View Post
    Ive had an extinguisher fail on me. I bought it for mandatory requirement when cutting fire wood in the forest. It was about a year old when it failed.

    From this failure I learned that its good to slam the bottom into the dirt every now and then to keep the chemicals from clodding up in the draw tube. And, have a backup. Just in case.
    Also about those dry chemical extinguishers, they DO need to be maintained or they will be useless when you need it like Insaneride found out. Turn them over monthly and rap the bottom with a dead blow mallet, the powder is SUPER fine and will clump if it just sits.


    A word of caution on the off chance you ever do encounter a metal fire. A "dry chemical" extinguisher is NOT A CLASS D extinguisher, which is a dry POWDER. That word is the difference between putting the fire out and making it MUCH WORSE, just like putting water on it. They are so hot that the dry chemical or water can instantly decompose into more fuel and/or oxygen turning a bad fire into a deadly disaster. Class D extinguishers are either graphite powder or salt. They smother and cool the metal fire, taking out two legs of the fire triangle (Fuel/Heat/Oxygen) remove any one and the fire is out.
    Ryan

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  11. #36
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    Re: Class D fires

    They usually use graphite and are used in machine shops and labs most often, but they do sort of cake it.

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