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Thread: "ground"

  1. #26
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    Re: "ground"

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    It's a wooden structure without much metal... the angle iron protecting the door sill at the concrete is one of the few pieces of structural metal in the building. Not much for outlets either... 5 110 plugins and 2 240's . I'm thinking I'll check the 240's first to make sure they are grounded to the white and not the green, but I'm sure they are. Lighting is just 2 big 200 watt incandescents since the building isn't heated in winter. Hmmm.... possibly the bare ground cable ( to the rod) is touching the circuit to the white grounds in the box? I'll have to look at it closer, but it's been that way for over a year. In the middle of seeding right now.
    This is incorrect.

    Your 3-wire 240v receptacles will not be connected to the white wire.

    Black wire- Hot leg 1
    Black or red wire Hot leg 2 ( Some people use a red wire and some just use another piece of black wire)
    Green wire for the ground.
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  2. #27
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    Nov 2013
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    Re: "ground"

    You want to know about Grounding?

    Got an Hour?

    From, The Man ->

  3. #28
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    Mar 2010
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    Re: "ground"

    Are the galvanized Pipes driven or old water pipes. I have see water pipes used as the neutral return on an old farm out building electrical system. Each building had a single conductor in the air between them and the system in each building was "grounded" to a water pipe. Worked quite well that way for many years until the system was updated. In general an electrical system has hot conductors, neutral conductors and safety Grounds,
    In a common single phase 240/120 system. The neutrals and the grounds can only be connected together at one place. The buss bar in the main entrance. A driven copper coated ground rod is connected to it.
    this way your green ground will not carry any current unless there is a fault and it will cause the breaker to trip.
    The white wire carries the same current as the black and red wires and should be the same size. If the white wire come loose from the neutral buss bar it could be at 115 volts. If the switch is on.
    When I get asked about why you get shocked or sparks happen when work clamp is being connected.
    I have them measure the voltage between the metal and the clamp. Is it AC or DC and how much.
    Depending on the welder model. This will point to where the voltage might be coming from.
    Is there a short in the welder or some where else.
    You can try measuring the door to a water pipe. Then measure ohms. Then the welder work clamp. Check both AC and DC. Unless the water pipes are all plastic.
    To check the welder check both electrode and work to plug ground, depending on the model will determine what the voltage will be. Some old TIG welders will have voltage on both. If the welder has 80 ocv it will read 60 on the electrode and 20 on the work. For this welder it is correct because of how it is wired.
    Sp post you measurements and what model welder you have.

  4. #29
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    Re: "ground"

    I had an electrical nightmare when I moved in this place, I had wires that in no way matched code, I had #10 wire ran with #14 wire, one solid and a stranded,no color coding at all, maybe not a big deal I guess, but I'm kind of a nit pick on things, I ripped those circuits out and ran proper wire. It was just a PITA, and maybe a little dangerous, if you didn't know. I think the carport still has to be done when I rebuild it..
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  5. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Re: "ground"

    Quote Originally Posted by walker View Post
    If you are a welder and cant figure out what somebody means when they say your ground clamp came off, then you have troubles. Improper terminology sure, but becomes proper terminology when used that way for a hundred years.
    Yea the ground in the car being the chassis or negative/black side of the system, a bare or green ground in a A/C electrical box and the ground lead from the welder are pretty hard to get confused from one another.

    If your that confused it won't matter. Your gonna #$# it all up !!!!!

    LMAO !!!! Got the one guy so confused he is gonna ground all his plugs to the neutral instead. Broccoli informed him not good idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Ok... while we're on the topic of grounds... I have a question. I'm in a farm yard (240, single phase ) and where the power comes in at the yard pole, there is a ground (literally a galvanized rod driven into the earth). Both houses and three sheds all have grounds (galvanized rods driven into the earth). Some of these rods are getting older and are no doubt corroded /eaten by moisture and electricity. Will the ability of these rods to transmit electricity affect my power availability or my power bill in any way, or are these simply there to accept the power from the green wire ground in the event of a failure? I know I have touched the steel door sill in one shed with the ground from my welder and saw sparks , so I cabled it to the ground rod to prevent that. Now I'm wondering if that was a good move, or is this an indication that it might be time to start replacing those ground rods?
    ….or the wiring system itself. Doesn't seem right unless it was high voltage feeding transformers but one leg of secondary power and the earth for a return is not a good plan.
    Last edited by danielplace; 06-07-2019 at 12:11 PM.

  6. #31
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    Oct 2014
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    Re: "ground"

    Think I may have quoted wrong post above.

    In any case ground rods do need to be replaced as they erode over time especially the steel ones of course. The rod, clamps and wiring should all be checked regularly and repaired/replaced if damaged at all.

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