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Thread: Heating steel with plasma cutter

  1. #1
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    Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Came across this video of a plasma cutter that can be used to heat steel.

    Can not find any other information other then from this manufacturer. I wonder how long consumables last?



    https://www.oxfordwelders.co.uk/plasma.html

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Gas rig do the same thing, and just as fast. Depends on tip size (shrug)

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Long arc a plasma, and it eats stuff. Anyways, that's what I've seen. I'm not really a plasma expert, so take it with a grain of salt.

    I am continually amazed at what the plasma folks do to skew folks away from flame processes.

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by farmersammm View Post
    Long arc a plasma, and it eats stuff.

    I am continually amazed at what the plasma folks do to skew folks away from flame processes.
    I don't think many people care enough to skew.... WGARA comes to mind... use what you want. I know plenty of guys who own plasma AND torches...

    the video is cool and all that... I've used that method myself/low low amps....


    but your right about the eating.... that method can go terribly wrong quick.
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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by farmersammm View Post
    Long arc a plasma, and it eats stuff. Anyways, that's what I've seen. I'm not really a plasma expert, so take it with a grain of salt.

    I am continually amazed at what the plasma folks do to skew folks away from flame processes.
    I have both. It has nothing to do with skewing people away from the flame. Its all about economics. The cost of gases is so rediculous anymore that I only use my torches when I have to. It is much cheaper to use a plasma. I can see the heating feature being very popular. It would make me think bout buying one with that feature. I will probably always have a torch set but will be glad not to use it.

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Not only that it is convenience. Having to haul heavy bottles, then there is the tangle of hoses. I find plasma much easier then gas. I imagine there is a reason a company like Hypertherm does not offer plasma heating. One would think they have done R&D work on it and might have found it not feasible to offer on something like their 45XP model.

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Economics...…………………………

    Factor in the cost of a cutter, and the compressor to keep up with it. Seems that gas wins.

    I use owner bottles...……..about 12 bucks for an O2 fill, and about 60 bucks for the Acetylene IIRC. Not a lot of bucks. Compared to thousands for a real work-with-it plasma setup.

    I'm worried, that, like a lot of other things, that we're dumbing down everything. It's a point, and click, world. Because it's shiny, and new, abandon the old processes. This worries me.

    The soup de jure is electric cars...……….never mind how we're gonna come up with the electricity to run them. I think the same thing is goin' on with the newer welding/cutting processes.

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Crawling up a ladder draging some hoses, compared to crawling up a ladder dragging up plasma leads...……….I'm sorry, but I don't see the difference.
    Last edited by farmersammm; 07-01-2019 at 11:08 PM. Reason: spelling

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    For instance...……………….

    Take yer plasma tip...…...rated at X inches of cut.

    On the flip side...……..take yer O2 tip rated at X inches of cut.

    You can cut deeper with the O2 tip, if necessary, but ya can't with the plasma tip.

    O2 is about skill, plasma is about how much money you can throw at the process. IMHO, of course.

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    How silly....
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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Silly, but true

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    IMHO, of course

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    A gas torch uses very little of either when heating unless using a rosebud. It's when you cut is when the oxy use goes way up especially with the #3 and up sizes.
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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    I'm LMAO literally, my grandfather passed in 2006 I remember back when I first started learning to ARC weld with a lincoln 225 buzz box up in Oregon (I was 11) him and Grandma used to travel around and lived in a travel trailer as they spent parts of each year near onea their kids which were all scattered out, he was retired way back then, when he saw my "work" he told me bout his days welding and riveting up on skyscrapers in new york and chicago and LA and how in the 20s right into the 30s everyone was talking about the dangers of that new fangled arc welder and how men were going to be falling from the skies electrocuted... some guys wouldn't even work on a beam if there was a welding lead strung across it.... we've come so far and yet have hardly moved an inch myself I just use the best tool for the job at hand, torch, plasma, bandsaw, chop saw stick welder, MIG or TIG whatever gets the highest quality job done and gets my bills paid..........

    Still got the 1962 Mack my Dad drove when it was new.. it was onea the first to have a Turbo charged cummins diesel engine, I found it in a construction yard back in 1997, NT280 with a 20 speed quadraplex behind it and an "L" cab funny that lil ol Mack sittin out there next to a row of 379 petes and that shiny 389 peterbilt with its on board computer and all that ol Mack.. its got an anolog tattle tale bolted to the dash has lil paper disks with colered pencil lines to track milage and speed........... back in 62 guys figured that turbo would never catch on after all it was gonna burn up the engines........ that 389 its got 2 turbos on it and a computer controls both of em............ I jump in that ol Mack and take it down the road after I've been on the road awhile in that shiny 389 and start forgetting what it feels like to have a cab thats not air ride and a tranny ya gotta double clutch and if ya miss a gear... running them twin sticks figure on coastin to a stop (cause the shift rods will be locked up) get out your hammer and go reach up under the cab and bang the offending shift rod into neutral so ya can start all over again... it was from a day when it took men to drive those trucks and weld the skyscrapers.. no place for sandal wearing millenials trying to keep up with social media while behind the wheel... buit guess what.. they are now the future as much as it drives me nuts to see some dude in a truck stop looking at his colore coded engine trying to figure out what just popped causin his truck to spew blue smioke.... or recently when I was tryin to sell a stick welder and kept getting asked if it was MIG or flux core.........
    Last edited by monsoon-mech; 07-02-2019 at 02:25 AM.

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by monsoon-mech View Post
    no place for sandal wearing millenials trying to keep up with social media while behind the wheel... buit guess what.. they are now the future as much as it drives me nuts to see some dude in a truck stop looking at his colore coded engine trying to figure out what just popped causin his truck to spew blue smioke.
    .
    Ain't that the truth.

    sad situation out there.

    I can't imagine what the trucking industry will be in another 10 years...... with the dumb teaching the dumber.
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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    I always recommend that anyone starting out in metal fabricating should always have a set of oxy-fuel torches before considering a plasma cutter. The oxy-fuel can heat things up (making it easy to loosen rusted fasteners), can allow parts to be bent, and can cut and gouge (slowly) steel. Once the torches are mastered and you decide you need to expand and get more productive....then it is time to think about plasma cutting. Plasma can cut any conductive material, can gouge as fast as a 600 Amp carbon arc gouging system (oxyfuel is comparatively slow), and can cut faster to 2" thickness on steel (with the right plasma of course, you need about 300 amps or more to do this). In regard to the video: I have tried these "Oxford" systems. 1. The heating function is ineffective as compared to oxy-fuels ability to accurately and rapidly apply heat. 2. Their claims that their combination of transformer and inverter technology being the best thing is old news! These are chopper based power supplies which were first introduced in the 1980's by Hypertherm (Max40, Max100, Max200), and discontinued in the late 1990's when inverter technology became robust, allowing more efficiency and more power as compared to the chopper or transformer plasma system designs. The weight of a 40 amp chopper power supply is 6 to 10 times that of a 40 amp inverter as well. (Max40 from Hypertherm weighed in at 230 lbs, the Powermax45 today weighs 34 lbs). Inverters today are more reliable, more powerful, more efficient. Jim Colt

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by John T View Post
    Ain't that the truth.

    sad situation out there.

    I can't imagine what the trucking industry will be in another 10 years...... with the dumb teaching the dumber.
    Hell, not gonna be any drivers if they have their way. Be a little black box in the cab (wait!!!!!!!!!.....they won't even need a cab anymore)

    It'll all come tumbling down though...……...when some smartazz kid, sitting on an overpass, hacks into the onboard guidance system.

    No factory workers, no truck drivers, no warehouse workers...……………..gee, ain't that great

  18. #18
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    Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by monsoon-mech View Post
    I'm LMAO literally, my grandfather passed in 2006 I remember back when I first started learning to ARC weld with a lincoln 225 buzz box up in Oregon (I was 11) him and Grandma used to travel around and lived in a travel trailer as they spent parts of each year near onea their kids which were all scattered out, he was retired way back then, when he saw my "work" he told me bout his days welding and riveting up on skyscrapers in new york and chicago and LA and how in the 20s right into the 30s everyone was talking about the dangers of that new fangled arc welder and how men were going to be falling from the skies electrocuted... some guys wouldn't even work on a beam if there was a welding lead strung across it.... we've come so far and yet have hardly moved an inch myself I just use the best tool for the job at hand, torch, plasma, bandsaw, chop saw stick welder, MIG or TIG whatever gets the highest quality job done and gets my bills paid..........

    Still got the 1962 Mack my Dad drove when it was new.. it was onea the first to have a Turbo charged cummins diesel engine, I found it in a construction yard back in 1997, NT280 with a 20 speed quadraplex behind it and an "L" cab funny that lil ol Mack sittin out there next to a row of 379 petes and that shiny 389 peterbilt with its on board computer and all that ol Mack.. its got an anolog tattle tale bolted to the dash has lil paper disks with colered pencil lines to track milage and speed........... back in 62 guys figured that turbo would never catch on after all it was gonna burn up the engines........ that 389 its got 2 turbos on it and a computer controls both of em............ I jump in that ol Mack and take it down the road after I've been on the road awhile in that shiny 389 and start forgetting what it feels like to have a cab thats not air ride and a tranny ya gotta double clutch and if ya miss a gear... running them twin sticks figure on coastin to a stop (cause the shift rods will be locked up) get out your hammer and go reach up under the cab and bang the offending shift rod into neutral so ya can start all over again... it was from a day when it took men to drive those trucks and weld the skyscrapers.. no place for sandal wearing millenials trying to keep up with social media while behind the wheel... buit guess what.. they are now the future as much as it drives me nuts to see some dude in a truck stop looking at his colore coded engine trying to figure out what just popped causin his truck to spew blue smioke.... or recently when I was tryin to sell a stick welder and kept getting asked if it was MIG or flux core.........
    Lol. Thanks for the memories about the two-stick shifts. I had to carry a small pry bar with me. No reaching under the cab for me. Had to CRAWL under. And always on a gravel shoulder for some reason....

    Oh and and O/A torch for me. WAY quicker heating than using the plaz torch in that (albeit cool) video.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Lis2323; 07-02-2019 at 02:28 PM.
    :

  19. #19
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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    A "little" Powermax1250 (single phase 230 volt, 80 amp output) cutting 5/8" steel. No preheat, decent cut speed, no dross, no oxygen and fuel gas tank, uses compressed air at 90 psi, about 6.5 cfm from a bottle or a compressor.





    Quote Originally Posted by jimcolt View Post
    I always recommend that anyone starting out in metal fabricating should always have a set of oxy-fuel torches before considering a plasma cutter. The oxy-fuel can heat things up (making it easy to loosen rusted fasteners), can allow parts to be bent, and can cut and gouge (slowly) steel. Once the torches are mastered and you decide you need to expand and get more productive....then it is time to think about plasma cutting. Plasma can cut any conductive material, can gouge as fast as a 600 Amp carbon arc gouging system (oxyfuel is comparatively slow), and can cut faster to 2" thickness on steel (with the right plasma of course, you need about 300 amps or more to do this). In regard to the video: I have tried these "Oxford" systems. 1. The heating function is ineffective as compared to oxy-fuels ability to accurately and rapidly apply heat. 2. Their claims that their combination of transformer and inverter technology being the best thing is old news! These are chopper based power supplies which were first introduced in the 1980's by Hypertherm (Max40, Max100, Max200), and discontinued in the late 1990's when inverter technology became robust, allowing more efficiency and more power as compared to the chopper or transformer plasma system designs. The weight of a 40 amp chopper power supply is 6 to 10 times that of a 40 amp inverter as well. (Max40 from Hypertherm weighed in at 230 lbs, the Powermax45 today weighs 34 lbs). Inverters today are more reliable, more powerful, more efficient. Jim Colt

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    Re: Heating steel with plasma cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by thegary View Post
    I have both. It has nothing to do with skewing people away from the flame. Its all about economics. The cost of gases is so rediculous anymore that I only use my torches when I have to. It is much cheaper to use a plasma. I can see the heating feature being very popular. It would make me think bout buying one with that feature. I will probably always have a torch set but will be glad not to use it.
    Forget the consumables cost, and think about what you're doing to the metal. Plasma is made up of the gases that go into the system. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen. The exact things you DON'T want in contact with heated metal if you want to keep the metal.

    Anyway, if you wanted to do this, a carbon arc torch would be cheaper and better.

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