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Thread: Miller Dialarc HF question

  1. #1
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    Miller Dialarc HF question

    Would this make a decent aluminum welder for a home shop?
    Jim

  2. #2
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    Re: Miller Dialarc HF question

    depends on what it is you want to weld. It takes more skill to weld super thin aluminum with one of these than a machine with pulse, or some other features. But it will weld aluminum for sure.
    Miller Multimatic 255

  3. #3
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    Re: Miller Dialarc HF question

    Thanks, Louie...that's exactly what I wanted to know!
    Jim

  4. #4
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    Re: Miller Dialarc HF question

    may run out of steam for 1/4" or thicker but 1/8 definitely doable.
    "Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum"

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  5. #5
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    Re: Miller Dialarc HF question

    Dialarc 250HF is a powerhouse. It'll weld pretty thick aluminum.

    Dialarc is 60 HZ Sine wave.

    To weld aluminum EP Electrode positive is needed to blast away the oxidation from the surface of aluminum, along with contaminates. This half cycle heats the tungsten electrode more than the metal you want to weld. This deforms the tungsten.

    The EP half cycle is slow to initiate because electrons are less concentrated in bigger surface of weld metal. Aluminum oxide is a poor conductor. Shielding gas must ionize to conduct.

    Newer inverter welders more often offer square wave power. The change in direction of current flow happens so suddenly ionization of shielding gas isn't lost. EP half cycle (electrons flowing from work to electrode) is more effective. It can be turned down, still cleaning adequately, but not overheating the tungsten.

    The short answer is yes it can do what higher tech machines do, it just takes WAY more skill.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

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