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Thread: Pattern Book

  1. #1
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    Pattern Book

    I've always found it very handy to have the old books on hand. For some reason, they are just more easily understood. Maybe it's the writing style. Dunno. But I like them and The Archive is a wonderful resource for anyone curious about how things were done back in the day.

    On top of that, most everything they did then is still applicable today.

    One of my favorite "Pattern Books", for example, helps you do a ton of things in the shop even if you're not working tin. Many is the time I've used these layout techniques to design and cut out thicker steel that I wanted to forge to shape and weld up into a larger piece. It's real easy to draw something out on a piece of paper, but drawing a working pattern that'll get you from a flat sheet to a curved sheet that'll fit like you want it to fit.... well, a Pattern Book sure comes in handy!


    https://archive.org/details/tinsmith...ge/20/mode/2up

    Name:  Tinsmith-Helper-and-Pattern-Book-47.jpg
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  3. #2
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    Re: Pattern Book

    It is a good book.
    I think most could use this book. I have more book one showing this data that dates back to 1940's.
    My father first show how to use data on plate. We had a drafting board 40" x 96" to and use white butcher paper 36" wide to draw out patterns.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    I've always found it very handy to have the old books on hand. For some reason, they are just more easily understood. Maybe it's the writing style. Dunno. But I like them and The Archive is a wonderful resource for anyone curious about how things were done back in the day.

    On top of that, most everything they did then is still applicable today.

    One of my favorite "Pattern Books", for example, helps you do a ton of things in the shop even if you're not working tin. Many is the time I've used these layout techniques to design and cut out thicker steel that I wanted to forge to shape and weld up into a larger piece. It's real easy to draw something out on a piece of paper, but drawing a working pattern that'll get you from a flat sheet to a curved sheet that'll fit like you want it to fit.... well, a Pattern Book sure comes in handy!


    https://archive.org/details/tinsmith...ge/20/mode/2up

    Name:  Tinsmith-Helper-and-Pattern-Book-47.jpg
Views: 452
Size:  48.0 KB

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  5. #3
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Never said it was the only book. That Archive site has hundreds of books, some very relevant, but out of print.

    I prefer the older books, pre-1970, because of their writing style and that special patina that only old books can have.

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    Re: Pattern Book

    I agree
    It is like the Machinist Hand Book after 1960's it less information. The last one I look just so must useless information.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    Never said it was the only book. That Archive site has hundreds of books, some very relevant, but out of print.

    I prefer the older books, pre-1970, because of their writing style and that special patina that only old books can have.

  8. #5
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Quote Originally Posted by smithdoor View Post
    I agree
    It is like the Machinist Hand Book after 1960's it less information. The last one I look just so must useless information.

    Dave
    Are you talking about Machinery's, or another book?

    Machinery's is the equivalent of the welders Bible from Lincoln. I use the Machinery's almost on a weekly basis.

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  10. #6
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    Re: Pattern Book

    [Yes it is the machinist bible I have both books

    Dave

    QUOTE=farmersammm;8792575]Are you talking about Machinery's, or another book?

    Machinery's is the equivalent of the welders Bible from Lincoln. I use the Machinery's almost on a weekly basis.[/QUOTE]

  11. #7
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Smithdoor..........................

    I definitely agree that Machinery's has some antiquated info. But..................is it still valid?

    I had to tap some bronze about 2 yrs ago. Machinery's recommended an animal fat tap lube. I got some bacon fat/drippings, and had at it That tap ran like butter!!!!!!!!!! And the tap tasted like HEAVEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Kidding aside..............the bacon fat ran nice........better than the tapping fluid I use.

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  13. #8
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Thanks for the link, I have been on the lookout for some pattern books for sheet metal, they seem to be few and expensive.
    Miller Challenger 172
    Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC 225/150
    Miller Maxstar 150 STL
    Victor 100C
    Victor Journeyman
    Oxweld OA
    Harris O/A
    Smith O/A little torch

    No, that's not my car.

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  15. #9
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Been wandering on that site a bit, there's some great old TV shows. I like watching those old shows from the 50's and 60's where they had live music performances. What a great site!
    Miller Challenger 172
    Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC 225/150
    Miller Maxstar 150 STL
    Victor 100C
    Victor Journeyman
    Oxweld OA
    Harris O/A
    Smith O/A little torch

    No, that's not my car.

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  17. #10
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Quote Originally Posted by bigb View Post
    Been wandering on that site a bit.....
    Yea, it's definitely one of those websites that'll suck the time right out of your day!

    I just bought a copy of The Tinsmith's Helper Pattern Book off ebay for a pittance... and from a Goodwill shop so all the money goes to charity. I wouldn't necessarily have done that if I couldn't have seen inside the cover on the Archive site first.

    I wonder if roof flashing is too thin to use. I'd had to practice on something like that just to have it be so flimsy that I end up with something that just can't be used beyond setting on a shelf to look pretty for fear it'll get dent or bent.

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  19. #11
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Hey Vaughn T, what type of layouts are you looking for ? I have round, rectangular, triangulation, parallel line pattern development. Anything tat can be fabricated from flat sheet. Also 45 + years of experience.

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  21. #12
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    Re: Pattern Book

    Quote Originally Posted by hommeacier View Post
    Hey Vaughn T, what type of layouts are you looking for ? I have round, rectangular, triangulation, parallel line pattern development. Anything tat can be fabricated from flat sheet. Also 45 + years of experience.
    Can't say that I have anything particular in mind. After smithing for all these years, the idea of doing something "easier" does sound appealing and it'd be nice to not have to swing a heavy hammer for hours at a time.

    I've always been intrigued by sheetmetal work, especially the tin stuff from the Colonial days. Not having to light the forge and deal with scorching-hot steel and setting my beard on fire would be a bonus.

    Knowing absolutely nothing about the trade, I'm always up for learning and seeing what I can do and how I can incorporate what I know from blacksmithing - even if that's just making some stakes and chisels.

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