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Thread: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

  1. #26
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    Re: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

    Agreed and yes it does. this is dual use land and since this is an ag building the only thing required are engineered and stamped foundation and trusses. They'll inspect the foundation and inspect how the building is put together once the shell is up. That's it.

    I suspect on your building since it's not ag zoned it 'could' be used as residential, thus the need for trusses every 2'. On insurance requirements, I've never not been able to insure every and any building I've put up. None with engineered stamped plans even.

    It's going to be built well. I'm just wanting some 2nd opines. I did contact another engineer to look at it. Plus I have talked to a post frame supplier and they are drawing it up. That way I'll have the wood option.

  2. #27
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    Re: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

    If you feel like figuring out how to do the calculations yourself there are quite a few places to do this ThIS tool is one of them, but you still need to know what everything in there is.

    But to put it simply, I don't think your engineer is far off with the suggestion of 6"x6"x1/2" ShS depending on the size of the building (judging by the picture you posted earlier it looks fairly large), I'm not going to go into a detailed explanation of why, but I will say if the building is intended for snow load and 110mph wind load, in 40 years when corrosion has well and truly set in I don't see the 5x5x1/4 holding up, the 6x6 is likely for bending stiffness, and the 1/2 thickness is likely for corrosion allowance so in 40 years you still have a building that's sound.

    Could you get away with 5x5x1/4? yeah, I have no doubt you could, but I would be betting that if you get a full snow load with some high winds in 30 years you might not want to be inside it.

    that being said there are other options, going with RhS or an I beam may more a more efficient use of steel for the same result, but again you either need to do the calculations yourself or get an engineer to to figure it out.
    Last edited by ttoks; 02-02-2021 at 05:25 PM.

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  4. #28
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    Re: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

    I did get an engineer to take a peek. He said 6x1/4" is worse case, but he thinks 5x1/4 will work. I'm waiting on the post frame building supplier before I pull the trigger. He wanted $2,100 for a full set. The post frame is no charge. I did find out the post frame company uses CCA treated on their columns, so that's good. That was a concern before.

  5. #29
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    Re: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

    Quote Originally Posted by sedgehammer View Post
    Howdy. I'm new here. Grew up on a farm. Was in the military, manufactured ag equipment that sold in several countries, owned a construction business amongst other things. Retired now (mostly medically induced). Can weld mig really good. My stick welding is alright, but getting better.

    Have a question on what tube size our monitor barn should take. Hope some can chime in. Thanks

    I know this isn't a welding only question, as it first takes designing. Just hoping that some of you guys have experience in this area.

    Were building a monitor barn. It's a weld up. Will be welding to weld plates set in the concrete footings. Will be gravel floor to start. Snow load is 25 lbs and wind load is 110 mph. Center part of the monitor is 30' wide. 4/12 pitch. Posts are to be 27' tall 8' apart. lean to on both sides are 18' wide x 16' tall. 3/12 pitch.

    Now I know this isn't as simple as it looks to figure. That is a tall post, but it is also supported by the lean to trusses welded to it as far as a stiffener goes. Yes it's more weight, but the wedge design on the mono truss does offer vertical strength to a point.

    I don't need the building engineered per se, but I want it to be strong enough to last.

    Thanks
    I've been thinking about this more today (i'm stay at home dad atm, need something to keep me entertained).

    I think there are better options than the 6"x6"x1/2" the engineer you consulted suggested, I'm not going to argue with whatever calculations or estimations they've made as I'm not an engineer, but I'm going to take a few educated guesses as to why they've gone with that and maybe offer up some alternatives to do the same job.

    Your suggestions of 5x5x1/4 would be plenty for the static load, even with a roof loaded with wet snow and high winds putting bending and twisting loads on it, where it doesn't stand up is once it starts to corrode, if you have a high wind load with corroded steel and a heavy static load from a roof full of wet snow I can see it failing.

    I think perhaps going with a rectangular hollow section in 6x3x1/2 or 6" I beam, and adding in additional bracing in the longitudinal directions to account for the narrower sections there could be a good option (threaded round steel rod in an X configuration is really common in a few or all of the bays between columns it adds to the fabrication time but it seems you will be doing that yourself so might not be an issue.

    another options is using a good coating to prevent corrosion in the first place, hot dip galvanising is a great option if there is a company close by that does it, corrosion allowance can be bought down a lot with good coatings offsetting the cost of the coating in steel savings, with good water management (meaning good footing design as the footing is where corrosion is going to happen the most) galvanised steel can last a heck of a long time, just keep in mind if going this route that once corison does start you don't have much allowance for it, so you will need to move quick to fix things once it starts.

    Using good quality rot resistant timber is also a good option, with the right choice of wood it doesn't behave the same as steel once corrosion sets in, some timbers are incredibly rot resistant and last a long time, although I suspect buying good timber would be more expensive than steel, and the general use pressure treated stuff doesn't last anywhere near as well as something like purple heart (which is really expensive and really good) so that's a choice for you to make.

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  7. #30
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    Re: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

    Columns not only have to withstand structural load under all circumstances, they have to hold up to unforseen stuff......................................Like running into a column with a truck/tractor/etc. It's one of the reasons I don't really like a lot of the pipe structures I see around here. Not much there.

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  9. #31
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    Re: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

    Thanks every one for their inputs. Even @welder Dave. I know he was just trying to give insight based on his experiences. Just like the rest of you.

    I'm currently waiting on the post frame company. They'll do the plans for free, but I have to buy a certain amount of the building from them. I do have an engineer that will do it for $2,100, so we'll see. Trusses locally are cheaper and I can use rough cut SYP for the girts. Anyways, once I get the costs I'll decide which direction we're going.

  10. #32
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    Re: Need help in what tube size to use for weld up building

    New engineer ran the loads. 3x.1875 on 10' centers passes load.

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