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Thread: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

  1. #26
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie B View Post
    Probably be best to weld enough to structurally join containers, then caulk with a good polyester caulk (Lexel). I agree, if you feel need to use a steel bridge to make weathertightness more permanent, 1/8" is adequate.
    These containers won't fit together tightly enough to weld the gap. A strip of 1/8" steel might bridge the gap. You can weld where it touches, then hammer the gaps for a close fit.
    If there is a gap, through round bar in it but then it probably needs 2 passes or maybe a weave. I thought Conex boxes are made to get real close together?

  2. #27
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie B View Post
    The whole thing was done with 1109 5/32

    I later learned the bulk 1109 was actually 6011 upside down.

    Murphy's Golden Rule: Whoever has the gold, makes the rules.

  3. #28
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar View Post
    225A for the hobart champion elite from what I see online.
    There are two models now :

    The old model 225 amp model

    Name:  Champion Elite 225.jpg
Views: 90
Size:  38.8 KB


    and the new 260 amp model



    Name:  Champion Elite 260.jpg
Views: 89
Size:  43.1 KB

    The guys I work with that do pre-fab buildings, have 3or 4 of these Hobarts on the trucks, and one 400 amp miller welder/genny(maybe an air pack ?) I asked them how they liked the Hobart because I was thinking of buying one. They told me they like them, they get at least a couple of hours a day use , sometimes all day, not many problems. They do like gas, they were carb models. I was told that 90% of their welding was done with these, only occasionally did they need to bring in the big welder. Only thing I'm surprised at is, that there is no CV for a wire feed on these. One of the guys said it was easier to run a stinger, than a wire feeder when doing buildings.These guys assemble commercial buildings, and factories all the time. Big Box buildings you might say.
    If your doing all the welding in concentrated areas gasless .045 would be good, but a stinger is probably your best bet. I'm in agreement with BD1, and welder Dave. Just buy a box of 50 lb box of 5/32" 7014, or 7024, or maybe even 7018 if you have to do any verticals . You'll be done before you know it, and you might need a leaf blower to get all the slag off the conainters when you finish. My local praxair just had a special on ESAB Atom arc 7018 5/32" 50lb can for $100, I kick myself for not grabbing it when I was there, gone the next time I came back. Post some pic's if you get a chance.

    Good Luck
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  5. #29
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Off-grid living is my thing. I lived off grid in a camper with my wife and 2 kids for two years. Started with 100 acres in the mountains with nothing on it but an old coal haul road and some logging trails. Built a cabin, did solar, water, septic etc.. I know the game of building off grid all too well. I figure you have realized an engine drive is your best bet. Your 8kw max generator only gives about 33 amps at 240v. I have an 8kw generator with 7600 running watts. That gives me about 31 amps. I have an ESAB 235ic(rebel) that will run 1/8" 7018 all day from said generator. It definitely will not run the .045 dual shield from that generator. Anyway.....I'm with the others on suggesting stick welding in stitches and filling in with seam sealer(not caulk). Automobiles are almost entirely held together with that stuff these days. Your containers also have seam seal on them. I have two 40 footers and I believe the corners are closer 5/16" than 3/8". I would think 1/4"x4" flat bar would be more than sufficient. An earthquake would crumple the entire container if it was catastrophic enough to rip the adjoining plate welds.

  6. #30
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Regarding the "seam sealer," if you want a product that will last many, many years (on your hands, too, if you get it on them), and require a bulldozer to pull apart, I'd recommend 3M 5200 Marine Adhesive Sealer. It's a polyurethane product, handles like caulk, and although it takes about a week to cure fully, once it's on there, it ain't coming off. (Not always a good thing but sometimes it is.)

    Just be sure to get it off your hands FAST with acetone or your hands will feel tacky (and turn black with dirt) for WEEKS, and the only way you'll get it off is with a sander or wire wheel. DAMHIKT
    Last edited by Kelvin; 05-11-2021 at 12:59 PM.

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  8. #31
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Hobart machines are just Millers with less features. What would be great is if a Miller Bobcat (closer to the Hobart) had the Excel Power option that only speeds the engine up as needed. The Miller Trailblazer 325 has this available as well as fuel injection to really save on gas but is a higher end welder/generator and quite a bit more $$$$. However it might be worth considering selling or trading one of your existing generators to get one of these. The Excel Power works for 120 outlets as well and runs low idle. Also has battery charging models. The generator end is industrial too and way better than most air cooled non inverter generators. Could run on propane if you wanted too and remote start and stop is an option. It is a CC/CV machine so could run a wire feeder no problem.

    https://www.millerwelds.com/-/media/...5--english.pdf
    Last edited by Welder Dave; 05-11-2021 at 01:35 PM.

  9. #32
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Quote Originally Posted by albrightree View Post
    There are two models now :

    The old model 225 amp model

    Name:  Champion Elite 225.jpg
Views: 90
Size:  38.8 KB


    and the new 260 amp model



    Name:  Champion Elite 260.jpg
Views: 89
Size:  43.1 KB

    The guys I work with that do pre-fab buildings, have 3or 4 of these Hobarts on the trucks, and one 400 amp miller welder/genny(maybe an air pack ?) I asked them how they liked the Hobart because I was thinking of buying one. They told me they like them, they get at least a couple of hours a day use , sometimes all day, not many problems. They do like gas, they were carb models. I was told that 90% of their welding was done with these, only occasionally did they need to bring in the big welder. Only thing I'm surprised at is, that there is no CV for a wire feed on these. One of the guys said it was easier to run a stinger, than a wire feeder when doing buildings.These guys assemble commercial buildings, and factories all the time. Big Box buildings you might say.
    If your doing all the welding in concentrated areas gasless .045 would be good, but a stinger is probably your best bet. I'm in agreement with BD1, and welder Dave. Just buy a box of 50 lb box of 5/32" 7014, or 7024, or maybe even 7018 if you have to do any verticals . You'll be done before you know it, and you might need a leaf blower to get all the slag off the conainters when you finish. My local praxair just had a special on ESAB Atom arc 7018 5/32" 50lb can for $100, I kick myself for not grabbing it when I was there, gone the next time I came back. Post some pic's if you get a chance.

    Good Luck
    I bought a Miller Bobcat 250 from an erector company. He had sold out to a bigger outfit. They only wanted to eliminate a competitor. All equipment was his to sell. He had already sold several Bobcat 225. Mine was likely dropped a few times. At least it was sitting in the bottom of a truck when they piled scrap iron on it. It isn't pretty. I've used it eight years, it performs as intended. It powers my house in outages (10 KW) & welds well. I paid $1200.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  10. #33
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelvin View Post
    Regarding the "seam sealer," if you want a product that will last many, many years (on your hands, too, if you get it on them), and require a bulldozer to pull apart, I'd recommend 3M 5200 Marine Adhesive Sealer. It's a polyurethane product, handles like caulk, and although it takes about a week to cure fully, once it's on there, it ain't coming off. (Not always a good thing but sometimes it is.)

    Just be sure to get it off your hands FAST with acetone or your hands will feel tacky (and turn black with dirt) for WEEKS, and the only way you'll get it off is with a sander or wire wheel. DAMHIKT
    That is good stuff, I've used it to repair delaminated fiberglass truck hoods with out having to tear them apart and reprep for resin repair. Spread the parts, squirt some 5200 in after washing out the dirt and loose stuff. Unfortunately you need to keep it clamped for 7 days to make sure it cures but I have never had one come apart.

  11. #34
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    Re: Off grid 1/4" or 3/8"

    Quote Originally Posted by 12V71 View Post
    That is good stuff, I've used it to repair delaminated fiberglass truck hoods with out having to tear them apart and reprep for resin repair. Spread the parts, squirt some 5200 in after washing out the dirt and loose stuff. Unfortunately you need to keep it clamped for 7 days to make sure it cures but I have never had one come apart.
    Yeah, I've had the unfortunate experience of having to remove 5200 from boats on occasion...got a chainsaw?
    I saw some people using it to caulk wooden planks on a tall ship in Norfolk once, they had a BARREL of the stuff ... I think I'd rather siphon raw sewage by mouth than have that job. Talk about a tarbaby.

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