Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    742
    Post Thanks / Like

    Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    I'm just curious about this...I was talking to someone in my neighborhood the other day who was talking about working in a huge warehouse and having to cut out and replace sections of vertical support beams that had been damaged by forklifts. The welds were x-rayed and/or checked ultrasonically.

    Is stick the standard process for that application? I've seen him with a Miller engine welder on his work truck but I didn't think to ask him at the time and I don't see him very often. Depending on which engine welder he had (maybe a Bobcat), would mig bite deep enough to work for that application?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Landrum, SC
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by JD1 View Post
    Is stick the standard process for that application? I've seen him with a Miller engine welder on his work truck but I didn't think to ask him at the time and I don't see him very often. Depending on which engine welder he had (maybe a Bobcat), would mig bite deep enough to work for that application?
    No stick isn't the standard and yes mig would work.
    Lincoln 330 MPX
    Modified Tombstone
    Lincoln Activ8X / LN-25X-TVT
    Magnum PRO 250LX GT Spool Gun
    Ton of Torches OFC-A / OFG-A
    SMAW FCAW GMAW

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    4,353
    Post Thanks / Like

    Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    I think technique would be more important than process or power.

    I just checked my pallet racking uprights and as I suspected they are only 14 gauge.

    A good dual voltage welder on 110V would be adequate if 220V wasn't handy.

    Load beams (horizontals) will vary in thickness though depending on rating and span.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Lis2323; 05-12-2021 at 11:09 AM.
    :

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    ct.
    Posts
    1,336
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Are we talking about repairing pallet racks or
    the building support columns in cheap per sq.ft.
    warehouse buildings? Some of those columns
    look to be 3/8 thick or more.
    Miller a/c-d/c Thunderbolt XL
    Millermatic 180
    Purox O/A
    Smith Littletorch O/A
    Hobart Champion Elite

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    4,353
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpump5 View Post
    Are we talking about repairing pallet racks or
    the building support columns in cheap per sq.ft.
    warehouse buildings? Some of those columns
    look to be 3/8 thick or more.
    Good question. When I read the first post I assumed he was talking vertical pallet racking support (frames) as they were IN the warehouse.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    :

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    4,353
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpump5 View Post
    Are we talking about repairing pallet racks or
    the building support columns in cheap per sq.ft.
    warehouse buildings? Some of those columns
    look to be 3/8 thick or more.
    Good question. When I read the first post I assumed he was talking vertical pallet racking support (frames) as they were IN the warehouse.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    :

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    33
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    I thought he was referring to support post in a building to hold the roof up.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Clovis California
    Posts
    2,630
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    I would go to manufacturer of build for a drawings. Next local planing department. If that fails I would replace with same.
    This can be a mine field as some manufacturer's will use high strength steel.

    When did this work I would calculate what need but most are not train for work. You would to engineer and check calculations. Most do not do this due to do the cost of the engineer.
    FYI In doing calculations I have found a few times the manufacturer under size the steel. I charged extra for fixing it right

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by JD1 View Post
    I'm just curious about this...I was talking to someone in my neighborhood the other day who was talking about working in a huge warehouse and having to cut out and replace sections of vertical support beams that had been damaged by forklifts. The welds were x-rayed and/or checked ultrasonically.

    Is stick the standard process for that application? I've seen him with a Miller engine welder on his work truck but I didn't think to ask him at the time and I don't see him very often. Depending on which engine welder he had (maybe a Bobcat), would mig bite deep enough to work for that application?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    3,554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by Freebirdwelds View Post
    No stick isn't the standard and yes mig would work.
    WRONG WRONG WRONG! Short circuit Mig is not approved for structural welding that it sounds like this is, especially if it was X-rayed and ultrasound tested. Spray arc or Flux-core can be used for structural. Spray arc requires welding in the flat or horizontal position only and would be kind of a pain to do. Stick is if using the right rods like 7018. Can't remember if 6010 can be used for root passes where full penetration is required.
    Last edited by Welder Dave; 05-12-2021 at 05:26 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    742
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpump5 View Post
    Are we talking about repairing pallet racks or
    the building support columns in cheap per sq.ft.
    warehouse buildings? Some of those columns
    look to be 3/8 thick or more.
    Sorry, they're building support columns that he has to cut out messed up sections and shore up the ceiling/roof while the work is being done. He has an engineer working with him on it.
    Last edited by JD1; 05-12-2021 at 06:44 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Landrum, SC
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by Welder Dave View Post
    WRONG WRONG WRONG! Short circuit Mig is not approved for structural welding that it sounds like this is, especially if it was X-rayed and ultrasound tested. Spray arc or Flux-core can be used for structural. Spray arc requires welding in the flat or horizontal position only and would be kind of a pain to do. Stick is if using the right rods like 7018. Can't remember if 6010 can be used for root passes where full penetration is required.
    Nice approach?
    I'm sorry I did not specify SMAW or GMAW-S. I've only been welding for 48 years and still take a lot for granted.


    .
    and PS: GMAW-S can be a prequalified process as a per case basis.





    .
    Last edited by Freebirdwelds; 05-12-2021 at 08:04 PM. Reason: Speeling
    Lincoln 330 MPX
    Modified Tombstone
    Lincoln Activ8X / LN-25X-TVT
    Magnum PRO 250LX GT Spool Gun
    Ton of Torches OFC-A / OFG-A
    SMAW FCAW GMAW

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Clovis California
    Posts
    2,630
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    I agree 👍
    At time I used 7018 now I like flux core E71T-11

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Welder Dave View Post
    WRONG WRONG WRONG! Short circuit Mig is not approved for structural welding that it sounds like this is, especially if it was X-rayed and ultrasound tested. Spray arc or Flux-core can be used for structural. Spray arc requires welding in the flat or horizontal position only and would be kind of a pain to do. Stick is if using the right rods like 7018. Can't remember if 6010 can be used for root passes where full penetration is required.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    3,554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by Freebirdwelds View Post
    Nice approach?
    I'm sorry I did not specify SMAW or GMAW-S. I've only been welding for 48 years and still take a lot for granted.


    .
    and PS: GMAW-S can be a prequalified process as a per case basis.





    .
    Sorry if I seemed harsh. I have no idea if the OP or anyone else is going to take info off of this site as the gospel. I'm sure the engineer would have a welding procedure and filler metal requirement. That's what they're paid for. I'm in Alberta that has some of the highest standards for welding in the world. As far as I know short circuit Mig is not approved for structural here. In specific applications maybe it can be??? I didn't work on a lot of structural except for oil and gas equipment. Skids up to 20 tons, pipe supports, base plates for vessels etc.

    I worked on pressure vessels and piping the last part of my welding career. Biggest job was probably about a 50 ton vessel 2 1/2" inches thick. A repad for a 20" nozzle was mistakenly cut for a 24" nozzle. Shop didn't want to pay to have a new repad made. 2 1/2 shifts to weld up the nozzle and repad burning boxes of 1/4" 7018. Dual-Shield was not yet approved for vessels and piping. I also got to re-tack one of the heads on this vessel. The head was 10' dia. and 2 3/4" thick tapered to 2 1/2" where it met the shell. The 10 ton crane was struggling with it. Anyway a few of us were not too far away when we started hearing these weird pinging sounds. We figured out what it was pretty quick. The bridge tacks with round bar holding the head on were cracking! Then boom the head fell off. It put a big dent in the concrete floor and crushed a wire feeder but the welder below was OK. I helped put the head back on and then did the Mig (short circuit) root pass and hot pass before it went to the Sub-arc boom. More time was spent grinding out all the 2" long bridge tacks than welding the root. Weld 4", grind out the tacks on both sides, weld 4", grind the tacks etc.

    Also a lot of people confuse wire feed welding processes or refer to them interchangeably. Basically a wire feed process is Mig. Flux-Core is a good example too. Many don't realize there are 2 types of flux-core and many variations in each. Innershield or Self-Shielding and Dual-Shield with gas shielding. For the most part the Dual-Shield is used for more critical type work. There are self-shielded wires for critical applications but they are not nearly as common. I'm sure you have tons of experience and know your stuff. I just didn't want someone to take your advice as what was OK for the job. It can be very hard when you know what you're talking about but less experienced people aren't even aware of the different processes or filler metal requirements.

    Oh welcome to the forum

    Dave
    Last edited by Welder Dave; 05-12-2021 at 11:40 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Landrum, SC
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by Welder Dave View Post
    Sorry if I seemed harsh. I have no idea if the OP or anyone else is going to take info off of this site as the gospel. I'm sure the engineer would have a welding procedure and filler metal requirement. That's what they're paid for. I'm in Alberta that has some of the highest standards for welding in the world. As far as I know short circuit Mig is not approved for structural here. In specific applications maybe it can be??? I didn't work on a lot of structural except for oil and gas equipment. Skids up to 20 tons, pipe supports, base plates for vessels etc.

    I worked on pressure vessels and piping the last part of my welding career. Biggest job was probably about a 50 ton vessel 2 1/2" inches thick. A repad for a 20" nozzle was mistakenly cut for a 24" nozzle. Shop didn't want to pay to have a new repad made. 2 1/2 shifts to weld up the nozzle and repad burning boxes of 1/4" 7018. Dual-Shield was not yet approved for vessels and piping. I also got to re-tack one of the heads on this vessel. The head was 10' dia. and 2 3/4" thick tapered to 2 1/2" where it met the shell. The 10 ton crane was struggling with it. Anyway a few of us were not too far away when we started hearing these weird pinging sounds. We figured out what it was pretty quick. The bridge tacks with round bar holding the head on were cracking! Then boom the head fell off. It put a big dent in the concrete floor and crushed a wire feeder but the welder below was OK. I helped put the head back on and then did the Mig (short circuit) root pass and hot pass before it went to the Sub-arc boom. More time was spent grinding out all the 2" long bridge tacks than welding the root. Weld 4", grind out the tacks on both sides, weld 4", grind the tacks etc.

    Also a lot of people confuse wire feed welding processes or refer to them interchangeably. Basically a wire feed process is Mig. Flux-Core is a good example too. Many don't realize there are 2 types of flux-core and many variations in each. Innershield or Self-Shielding and Dual-Shield with gas shielding. For the most part the Dual-Shield is used for more critical type work. There are self-shielded wires for critical applications but they are not nearly as common. I'm sure you have tons of experience and know your stuff. I just didn't want someone to take your advice as what was OK for the job. It can be very hard when you know what you're talking about but less experienced people aren't even aware of the different processes or filler metal requirements.

    Oh welcome to the forum

    Dave
    It's all good Dave. No worries.

    Thank You.
    Lincoln 330 MPX
    Modified Tombstone
    Lincoln Activ8X / LN-25X-TVT
    Magnum PRO 250LX GT Spool Gun
    Ton of Torches OFC-A / OFG-A
    SMAW FCAW GMAW

  15. Likes Welder Dave liked this post
  16. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    NW New Jersey
    Posts
    773
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by JD1 View Post
    Sorry, they're building support columns that he has to cut out messed up sections and shore up the ceiling/roof while the work is being done. He has an engineer working with him on it.
    Like these :

    Name:  IMG_1907.jpg
Views: 126
Size:  120.9 KB


    Name:  IMG_1911.jpg
Views: 128
Size:  62.8 KB


    Name:  IMG_1909.jpg
Views: 125
Size:  105.6 KB


    Name:  IMG_1912.jpg
Views: 125
Size:  53.5 KB


    The company that engineered the building will spec the repair for our Plant Engineer.
    Airco 250 ac/dc Heliwelder Square wave
    Miller Synchrowave 180 sd
    Miller Econo Twin HF
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Dayton 225 ac/dc
    Victor torches
    Snap-On YA-212
    Lotos Cut60D

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    3,554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Process for cutting and replacing sections of vertical supports in a warehouse?

    Quote Originally Posted by Freebirdwelds View Post
    It's all good Dave. No worries.

    Thank You.
    I forgot to mention the repad weld was with 2 weldors, 1 on each side. 2 tiger torches (weed burners for preheat). Nozzle was fitted and welded on inside. Outside had to be gouged to get into inside weld and then cleaned up with a die grinder cause no room for a standard grinder. Stayed hot for about a day! A job you never forget. I liked it because the time flew by just burning the big rods and not having to worry about anything else.

  18. Likes Freebirdwelds liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,624,260,953.22364 seconds with 15 queries