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Thread: Machinist question

  1. #1
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    Machinist question

    Name:  P1000474.jpg
Views: 481
Size:  114.5 KB Hi I'm not sure if this is appropriate here as it is more a machinist question.
    I have had this Sealey puller for ages. But the threads have got twisted and broken. the
    threaded inside part is ok as the top two" of thread works good I was looking for a new one as it was
    a very handy puller. But the only one's I can find in that size are on ebay UK and the seller doesn't
    ship to Canada. It is 250mm wide and 200mm long. I wondered if it would be possible to cut a new
    bolt for it? It is a very fine thread. But the centre seems heavy enough to drill and change to a courser
    thread if that would be easier. I appreciate any suggestions . Hope Sam might notice it?
    Thanks

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    Re: Machinist question

    Thread insert

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    Re: Machinist question

    There Journeyman ‎Machinist here.
    I have union card myself but background in welding and fabrication.

    Typically I would just use grade 8 all thread. The internal thread maybe damage too check before buy the all thread.
    You both inch and mm all thread.
    So choose for next step up.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey View Post
    Name:  P1000474.jpg
Views: 481
Size:  114.5 KB Hi I'm not sure if this is appropriate here as it is more a machinist question.
    I have had this Sealey puller for ages. But the threads have got twisted and broken. the
    threaded inside part is ok as the top two" of thread works good I was looking for a new one as it was
    a very handy puller. But the only one's I can find in that size are on ebay UK and the seller doesn't
    ship to Canada. It is 250mm wide and 200mm long. I wondered if it would be possible to cut a new
    bolt for it? It is a very fine thread. But the centre seems heavy enough to drill and change to a courser
    thread if that would be easier. I appreciate any suggestions . Hope Sam might notice it?
    Thanks

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    Re: Machinist question

    The thread insert is only a stop gap that purchased over counter.
    When make insert's I use O1 tool steel. But puller is very then at threads which may fail using inserts.

    Dave

    One of the better in pass was bore threads a little bigger and use straight insert with collar for welding so does not turn it takes less metal still using O1 tool steel.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mac's Crew View Post
    Thread insert

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Last edited by smithdoor; 06-11-2021 at 03:09 PM.

  5. #5
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    Re: Machinist question

    Finer threads allow a lot more torque. I think you should be be able to drill and tap it for the next larger size (or 2 sizes larger depending on drill size for tap) fine thread bolt. Then use a grade 8 or stronger bolt for the screw like Smithdoor mentioned. Most important is getting the threads perfectly straight in the puller so the screw stays centered. Clamped and using a drill press or mill to tap would be best.

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    Re: Machinist question

    Quote Originally Posted by Welder Dave View Post
    Finer threads allow a lot more torque. I think you should be be able to drill and tap it for the next larger size (or 2 sizes larger depending on drill size for tap) fine thread bolt. Then use a grade 8 or stronger bolt for the screw like Smithdoor mentioned. Most important is getting the threads perfectly straight in the puller so the screw stays centered. Clamped and using a drill press or mill to tap would be best.
    Why drill and tap the body when those threads are good? Wouldn't just be easier to get a thread gauge, find out what pitch the bolt has and replace that with something that matches?
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    Re: Machinist question

    Generally the threads on the screw stretch and get banged up. Finding a threaded rod the same pitch and size may be difficult. McMaster Carr carries some weird threaded rods and also many pullers utilize the same odd size threads. Tig welding a nut on the underside and using a different thread size and pitch may be an option.

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    Re: Machinist question

    Quote Originally Posted by G-ManBart View Post
    Why drill and tap the body when those threads are good? Wouldn't just be easier to get a thread gauge, find out what pitch the bolt has and replace that with something that matches?
    Definitely the route I would take. Simple solutions first
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    Re: Machinist question

    Here's a chart of both metric and standard machine screws:
    https://www.bestmaterials.com/PDF_Fi...crew-sizes.pdf

    It likely that the screw is metric since the manufacturer is in the UK

    Putting a coarser screw is a bad idea (re. Welder Dave). A fine screw is like low gear on a transmission. Makes it easier to generate more force. If you want to pull a stump, you put the truck in low gear.

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  14. #11
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    Re: Machinist question

    If I read you right, the body of the puller has threads that are still OK. If that is the case, figure out thread pitch and diameter with a mic or calipers at least and a simple thread pitch gage. I would cut off the damaged part of the rod so you don't damage the thread in the puller body when backing it out and then either replace with an off the shelf item or find a good machinist with a lathe to match it for you.

    If the body threads are damaged but not totally dead, I would do the same process and then find a thread chaser or tap to see if you can restore them first, before taking more drastic measures as posted above. And after you fix it, make sure to use lube on the threads anytime you use it to help avoid the issue.
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    Re: Machinist question

    Im guessing that would be an acme screw, usually Higher quality pullers are.
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

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    Re: Machinist question

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey View Post
    Name:  P1000474.jpg
Views: 481
Size:  114.5 KB Hi I'm not sure if this is appropriate here as it is more a machinist question.
    I have had this Sealey puller for ages. But the threads have got twisted and broken. the
    threaded inside part is ok as the top two" of thread works good I was looking for a new one as it was
    a very handy puller. But the only one's I can find in that size are on ebay UK and the seller doesn't
    ship to Canada. It is 250mm wide and 200mm long. I wondered if it would be possible to cut a new
    bolt for it? It is a very fine thread. But the centre seems heavy enough to drill and change to a courser
    thread if that would be easier. I appreciate any suggestions . Hope Sam might notice it?
    Thanks
    To answer your question, yes a good machinist could make a new screw on a lathe. Typically pullers do not use a commonly available thread (that's not ACME thread), but most lathe's should be able to duplicate it.

    The bigger challenge will be cost. An hour or so of machinist's time, plus the raw material, may cost more than what a replacement puller would be.
    Last edited by scsmith42; 06-12-2021 at 08:39 AM.
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    Re: Machinist question

    Most pulley puller use a extra fine thread.
    If do not have the cost can get hight.
    Even buying tap is costly.

    Dave

    Tap cost
    https://www.mcmaster.com/Taps/general-purpose-taps-9/thread-size~3-4-20/thread-type~unef/

    Pulley puller
    https://www.mcmaster.com/6340K32/

    Quote Originally Posted by scsmith42 View Post
    To answer your question, yes a good machinist could make a new screw on a lathe. Typically pullers do not use a commonly available thread (that's not ACME thread), but most lathe's should be able to duplicate it.

    The bigger challenge will be cost. An hour or so of machinist's time, plus the raw material, may cost more than what a replacement puller would be.
    Last edited by smithdoor; 06-12-2021 at 10:08 AM.

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    Re: Machinist question

    You may want look at hydraulic type

    https://www.harborfreight.com/5-ton-...ler-95326.html

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey View Post
    Name:  P1000474.jpg
Views: 481
Size:  114.5 KB Hi I'm not sure if this is appropriate here as it is more a machinist question.
    I have had this Sealey puller for ages. But the threads have got twisted and broken. the
    threaded inside part is ok as the top two" of thread works good I was looking for a new one as it was
    a very handy puller. But the only one's I can find in that size are on ebay UK and the seller doesn't
    ship to Canada. It is 250mm wide and 200mm long. I wondered if it would be possible to cut a new
    bolt for it? It is a very fine thread. But the centre seems heavy enough to drill and change to a courser
    thread if that would be easier. I appreciate any suggestions . Hope Sam might notice it?
    Thanks

  21. #16
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    Re: Machinist question

    Use some anti-seize on those puller threads and they will hold up a LOT better, and work easier.
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  23. #17
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    Re: Machinist question

    I realize you like the jaw design of your Sealy because it has served you well for years.

    If you are unable to repair yours, a 2 or 3 jaw puller from PosiLock will do the job.

    Notice the cage to keep jaws from spreading. A tube of extreme pressure lube is supplied for the screws.







    These PosiLock are all I used on the farm.


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  25. #18
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    Re: Machinist question

    Thanks everyone for their ideas and suggestions. I will take the puller into the machine shop in our local town
    and hear what they say. A new one is about 80 pounds UK. Which would be about $140 Canadian. With shiooing and customs duties probably over $200. Lis 2323. I do have a posi lock Puller. It is a 208 Two legged puller. I think it opens 12'. It is a far stronger and better puller than the sealey. But out of my selection of pullers I mostly use the sealey as I find it very quick and handy to use, I am very envious Of your collection of pullers though. A lot of moneys worth of tools there.

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  27. #19
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    Re: Machinist question

    The first thing I would probably do is run a die over the threads and see if I could straighten them out. That's if you could purchase the die reasonably.

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    Re: Machinist question

    Quote Originally Posted by wayne55 View Post
    The first thing I would probably do is run a die over the threads and see if I could straighten them out. That's if you could purchase the die reasonably.
    IMO, if you straighten those threads enough to use it as a puller it will get part way through the yoke & gall the threads and probably screw up the threads in the yoke.
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  30. #21
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    Re: Machinist question

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey View Post
    Thanks everyone for their ideas and suggestions. I will take the puller into the machine shop in our local town
    and hear what they say. A new one is about 80 pounds UK. Which would be about $140 Canadian. With shiooing and customs duties probably over $200. Lis 2323. I do have a posi lock Puller. It is a 208 Two legged puller. I think it opens 12'. It is a far stronger and better puller than the sealey. But out of my selection of pullers I mostly use the sealey as I find it very quick and handy to use, I am very envious Of your collection of pullers though. A lot of moneys worth of tools there.
    Wow a puller that opens 12 feet. You could use that on some the the things Mesta made. Having a machine shop do all the work may cost as much or more than a new clamp.

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  32. #22
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    Re: Machinist question

    How do use a 12 foot puller?

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey View Post
    Thanks everyone for their ideas and suggestions. I will take the puller into the machine shop in our local town
    and hear what they say. A new one is about 80 pounds UK. Which would be about $140 Canadian. With shiooing and customs duties probably over $200. Lis 2323. I do have a posi lock Puller. It is a 208 Two legged puller. I think it opens 12'. It is a far stronger and better puller than the sealey. But out of my selection of pullers I mostly use the sealey as I find it very quick and handy to use, I am very envious Of your collection of pullers though. A lot of moneys worth of tools there.

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    Re: Machinist question

    Quote Originally Posted by smithdoor View Post
    How do use a 12 foot puller?

    Dave

    With a 13 foot hand!!

    I would adapt it to a hydraulic cylinder like sold by Porta-Power,, then live happily after,,

    https://www.amazon.com/Porta-Power-H...47081414&psc=1



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    Re: Machinist question

    Looks like good puller
    Lot quicker that old type.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by SweetMK View Post
    With a 13 foot hand!!

    I would adapt it to a hydraulic cylinder like sold by Porta-Power,, then live happily after,,

    https://www.amazon.com/Porta-Power-H...47081414&psc=1



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