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Thread: Wood treatment "bora-care" recipe

  1. #1
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    Wood treatment "bora-care" recipe

    This is a wood treatment I use in a very termite and wood - boring insect heavy area. It is extremely effective. Also works great for drywall. I just finished making a couple gallons and thought I'd share this info in case any of you didn't know.

    The commercial equivalent is used in commercial construction, and is a proven and time tested effective wood preservative.



    FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY:



    Bora-care is a VERY popular, super effective commercially available wood preservative, but it is based on an OLD US Navy recipe (over 100 years from what I understand).

    It is just borates suspended in a medium (glycol) that facilitates their travel and deposit through wood.

    It penetrates most popular wood finishes, paints, varnishes ** DOES NOT PENETRATE POLYURETHANE OR EPOXY finishes **

    Does not affect glues, caulks, wood filler, etc.

    It actually works better on green wood, but it works fine on dried wood (water facilitates the glycol travel).

    It is anti fungal, anti pest. One of the few treatments that Will kill current mold and spore infestations (remedial use), and prevent future infestation. The same goes for current infestations of all known wood harming insects.

    Borates work as long as they are present (FOREVER).




    The RECIPE I use is as follows:

    1 gallon glycol, 4.5 lbs Borax, 3.5 lbs boric acid

    (there is another recipe with less borax and boric acid but I have read THIS recipe compensates for water locked in the borates, and IMO a borate heavy solution is not a bad thing)

    Mix everything and heat to 260 degree F.

    Finished product is toxic and will kill living things (weeds, plants, trees, insects, larger animals in relatively large doses), so be mindful of where your runoff is going, and any spills. Don't want the dogs or cats licking this off their paws.

    EVERYTHING IS TOXIC, don't breathe fumes, don't touch anything, don't look at anything, and use proper protective equipment for everything.
    (boiling radiatior fluid = not good for the human body but be realistic about risks)

    End product will be thicker than syrup, with an almost candy like consistency.

    I use the cheapest concentrated anti freeze I can find for the glycol (98% ethylene glycol), though any glycol can be used.



    DIRECTIONS FOR USE:

    Mix solution 50/50 with water VERY WELL, apply liberally to every exposed wood surface you treat. (weed sprayer is usually the easiest method)

    DO NOT wet wood prior to application.

    A couple coats on thicker beams and members ( you will get 4-6 inches of penetration from applied surface, but you need enough on the surface to carry through).

    Let dry and then paint/finish wood as you usually would. Bare wood is fine if in dry location (attic, walls, etc).

    Product will work as long as it is not washed out (forever).

    If the glycol you use is colored (anti-freeze) you may tint paint or finishes, always test a sample if in doubt.
    Last edited by SlowBlues; 08-26-2021 at 09:07 PM.

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  3. #2
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    Re: Wood treatment "bora-care" recipe

    So, not to be used on outdoor wood fence posts?
    Chris
    Auction Addict

  4. #3
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    Re: Wood treatment "bora-care" recipe

    I believe it's effectiveness in that case would be depend on the amount of rain and moisture, and how thick the members are (faces will have the borates leeched out first).

    In a dry climate (where I live) I've found it to be pretty effective, even in unfinished wood. The borates are in a relatively dry form in the wood after dry, and they do not get leeched out by dust (like an oil), but moisture WILL pull them out.

    I like to use it in conjuction with some kind of tar based product if used without an anchor in ground.

    Above ground in a fence situation you would probably want a finish on your fence. I would suggest a *real* lacquer or varnish type finish - something that will not peel (it just wears off), and is easy to recoat/touch up.

    Borates aren't good for living things around the fence, but when used as above I've never had any problem with grass or weed growth right next to the post.

    Another thing is if you use ethylene glycol (other glycols are considered food safe) you probably don't want it leeching into any live things around the post, grass, flowers, etc.

  5. #4
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    Re: Wood treatment "bora-care" recipe

    Quote Originally Posted by SlowBlues View Post
    I believe it's effectiveness in that case would be depend on the amount of rain and moisture, and how thick the members are (faces will have the borates leeched out first).

    In a dry climate (where I live) I've found it to be pretty effective, even in unfinished wood. The borates are in a relatively dry form in the wood after dry, and they do not get leeched out by dust (like an oil), but moisture WILL pull them out.

    I like to use it in conjuction with some kind of tar based product if used without an anchor in ground.

    Above ground in a fence situation you would probably want a finish on your fence. I would suggest a *real* lacquer or varnish type finish - something that will not peel (it just wears off), and is easy to recoat/touch up.

    Borates aren't good for living things around the fence, but when used as above I've never had any problem with grass or weed growth right next to the post.

    Another thing is if you use ethylene glycol (other glycols are considered food safe) you probably don't want it leeching into any live things around the post, grass, flowers, etc.
    I bought a 15 gallon drum of pentachlorophenol at an auction a few years back for $25. Was a nursery so, they were exempt from the EPA ban on it. I use it on my wood deck flatbed trailer once a year. Has kept the rot away since I started using it. Only takes a gallon to treat the entire deck.
    Chris
    Auction Addict

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