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Thread: Cold Saw

  1. #26
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    Re: Cold Saw

    I had a very pretty blue and gray Italian cold saw in my shop for ten years and used it rarely. All stainless applications. Thought it would reduce the dust of a chop saw and make more accurate cuts. Keeping sharp blades around was a PITA. Sounds like a dry saw is the way to go for steel.
    My main cut-off tool now is a cheap Makita 4.5" grinder with .030 Pferd disk on it. Cuts faster than most anything on stainless. The Makita is the quietest 4.5 grinder I've ever used.

  2. #27
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    Re: Cold Saw

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    Another vote for the Makita dry cut saw.


    Plus 1 on the Makita LC1230. Here is a trash project. Dumbbell rack. The post-cut squareness is near perfect. I have mine on a cart so I can bring into play as needed. Plans for a integral feed roller for long support. Currently I use rollers off the pic screen.

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  4. #28
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    Re: Cold Saw

    Quote Originally Posted by Continuum View Post
    Plus 1 on the Makita LC1230. Here is a trash project.
    I will say this too. I treat this Makita with extra care. These blades will be destroyed quickly cutting hardened steel. And this is where abrasive cut technology really shines. Before I made these cuts, I did several file tests. Even so, they were just a tad harder than I’d like.

    Bottom line, like Lis, both.

    Regards

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  6. #29
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    Re: Cold Saw

    Quote Originally Posted by G-ManBart View Post
    You will be very limited in the thickness of steel you can cut with that...1/8" for tubing, angle, and 1/4" for plate. The blade RPM is simply too high for cutting heavier stock.

    An observation:

    If you stick with the Evolution 10" 28-tooth blade, the circumferential speed in combination with the lower tooth-count leads to a slower speed, in terms of tooth-impacts per unit time, compared to a standard 14" 66- or 72-tooth blade. Raw blade RPM alone is not the sole determining factor, IMO.

    A 14" 66-tooth blade will produce ~1,450 tooth impacts per second @ 1300 RPMs.
    A 10" 28-tooth blade will produce ~1,150 tooth impacts per second @ 2500 RPMs. (Equivalent of a 14" 66-tooth blade spinning at 950 RPMs)

    So even though the raw RPM is higher on the 10" saw, from the perspective of the part being cut, the tooth impact frequency would "feel" like a 14" 66-tooth blade spinning slower was cutting it.

    A "more standard" 10" blade with 50-teeth, would produce the equivalent of a 14" 66-tooth blade ~2100 RPMs. That could probably be more limiting.
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  7. #30
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    Re: Cold Saw

    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar View Post
    An observation:

    If you stick with the Evolution 10" 28-tooth blade, the circumferential speed in combination with the lower tooth-count leads to a slower speed, in terms of tooth-impacts per unit time, compared to a standard 14" 66- or 72-tooth blade. Raw blade RPM alone is not the sole determining factor, IMO.

    A 14" 66-tooth blade will produce ~1,450 tooth impacts per second @ 1300 RPMs.
    A 10" 28-tooth blade will produce ~1,150 tooth impacts per second @ 2500 RPMs. (Equivalent of a 14" 66-tooth blade spinning at 950 RPMs)

    So even though the raw RPM is higher on the 10" saw, from the perspective of the part being cut, the tooth impact frequency would "feel" like a 14" 66-tooth blade spinning slower was cutting it.

    A "more standard" 10" blade with 50-teeth, would produce the equivalent of a 14" 66-tooth blade ~2100 RPMs. That could probably be more limiting.
    I'll let you do the math, but Evo's website lists the S380CPS as 1,450rpm and the R255MS at 2,600rpm...those are no-load speeds, so no idea what they are when actually cutting. I would expect the bigger blade would slow more under load, but that's just a guess.
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  8. #31
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    Re: Cold Saw

    Quote Originally Posted by G-ManBart View Post
    I'll let you do the math, but Evo's website lists the S380CPS as 1,450rpm and the R255MS at 2,600rpm...those are no-load speeds, so no idea what they are when actually cutting. I would expect the bigger blade would slow more under load, but that's just a guess.
    I bought a diamond saw blade for concrete, and the 7 1/4" blade cut so well, I thought about getting the 10 1/4" saw and blade.
    Like the 7" saw, which is rated at 15 amps, the 10" is also rated at 15 amps,,

    (one saw is rated at 2600 watts, that is over 20 amps,, so we know the manufacturer is "taking advertising liberties,," )

    The biggest complaints about the bigger saw was that if you pressed it hardly at all,
    you had to let off the pressure, and let the saw speed up again.

    with the smaller saw, I can get the saw into concrete full depth, and push pretty hard, the saw has that much power.

    So, no 10 1/4" saw and blade for me,, at least for cutting concrete,, NOW, I WANT A GAS ENGINE SAW!!

    Maybe a gas engine metal cutting saw would be the perfect answer??

  9. #32
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    Re: Cold Saw

    4-1/2 wheel works pretty good too.

    (Just scoring here)

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  10. #33
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    Re: Cold Saw

    Quote Originally Posted by SweetMK View Post
    I bought a diamond saw blade for concrete, and the 7 1/4" blade cut so well, I thought about getting the 10 1/4" saw and blade.
    Like the 7" saw, which is rated at 15 amps, the 10" is also rated at 15 amps,,

    (one saw is rated at 2600 watts, that is over 20 amps,, so we know the manufacturer is "taking advertising liberties,," )

    The biggest complaints about the bigger saw was that if you pressed it hardly at all,
    you had to let off the pressure, and let the saw speed up again.

    with the smaller saw, I can get the saw into concrete full depth, and push pretty hard, the saw has that much power.

    So, no 10 1/4" saw and blade for me,, at least for cutting concrete,, NOW, I WANT A GAS ENGINE SAW!!

    Maybe a gas engine metal cutting saw would be the perfect answer??
    I once did installations of energy efficiency upgrades in walk in coolers. It involved a lot of cutting concrete & masonry. No gasoline powered saws would be acceptable. I used a 10" diamond blade with a 9" Milwaukee grinder. I could cut only about 3" deep, so it wasn't perfect, but along with a big rotary hammer, I managed.
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