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Thread: Jack Repair

  1. #1
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    Jack Repair

    This is the one I bent like a noodle a few weeks back

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Size:  238.9 KB The thing wouldn't budge, so the area where the bend occurred had to be slit, and cut off.

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Size:  239.3 KB The cut off section has some damage, and wouldn't have slid off unless it was slit.

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Size:  199.9 KB Taking a look at the bend, and where heat will be required to straighten in. The heat is applied to the top flange, and both sides, in the pie shaped pattern, then hit with water to hasten the shrinking process. Nary a hammer, or heavy object will touch this piece. It's all a heat shrinking process.

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Size:  219.1 KB Damage to the inner tube from cutting the section of outer tube is filled, and ground flush. I don't do MIG, so y'all can just kiss my butt

  2. #2
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    Re: Jack Repair

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Size:  208.9 KB The clamps are tightened a bit, not too much. Very little force is needed...............the clamps are mainly for restraint.....keeping the metal from expanding beyond the upset point. They'll loosen once the steel starts to shrink. Heat is kept to around 1200*

    Name:  jack repair13.jpg
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Size:  212.3 KB Here you can see how the heat is applied. I generally don't need to go beyond the neutral axis on tubing. Depends on the severity of the bend. This piece took about 3 different heating cycles in 3 places to get it straight.

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    Get back to it tomorrow. Put the cut off piece back on, and then focus on either straightening, or replacing, the thingy that pins the jack to the baler.

  3. #3
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    Re: Jack Repair

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Size:  220.4 KB The main tube was also bent, and had to be smoogied. Shrining was made easy by using the inner tube to apply the necessary force when retracted.

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Size:  246.7 KB Inner tube is blued to see where the interference is.

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Size:  216.6 KB Just that one spot was hanging it up.

    Cut off portion was reattached using scabs/fishplates. The welds look like someone at Vo Tech did 'em. Earliest they can take me for the cataracts is in late December.

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Size:  181.9 KB Fully extended.

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Size:  182.3 KB Fully retracted past the previously damaged portion. I guess it's a success

    The square tubing that attaches the jack to the baler was heat worked, not heat shrunk. It was heated to orange, a bar inserted in the holes, and twisted back into rough shape.

  4. #4
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Name:  jack repair22.jpg
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Size:  246.9 KB Ready to go

    The baler was on a hydraulic jack (all my cribbing is in use on other stuff, and the equipment stand is under the Allis), which shifted, and the baler fell off. It's still under the tongue. I'm hoping the pickup reel wasn't damaged when the baler fell. I believe the baler weighs somewhere near 5K, with a huge proportion of the weight on the tongue. I guess we'll find out when I put the little crane back on the Oliver to lift it up today.

  5. #5
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Looks good. Probably better than new but I would likely have gone this route here and that's CAD$: https://www.princessauto.com/en/5000...t/PA0008051013
    ---Meltedmetal

  6. #6
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by Meltedmetal View Post
    Looks good. Probably better than new but I would likely have gone this route here and that's CAD$: https://www.princessauto.com/en/5000...t/PA0008051013
    Me too, but here's the route I would have gone. https://www.princessauto.com/en/5000...t/PA0008055055

    I've been picking up the 5,000 to 8,000 lb drop legs that weld on for most of my equipment and I love em. I can usually pick them up on sale for $40 to $60 Cdn. They don't shift sideways when you try to unhook like the pinned versions do. Just Chinese junk, but I have yet to have problems with one. I did the same thing Sam did with a rented spreader and replaced the bottom piece with new square tubing drilled full of holes and welded to the original base. It was also a weld on drop leg so no issues with where it attached to the frame.
    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
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    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
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  8. #7
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Me too, but here's the route I would have gone. https://www.princessauto.com/en/5000...t/PA0008055055

    I've been picking up the 5,000 to 8,000 lb drop legs that weld on for most of my equipment and I love em. I can usually pick them up on sale for $40 to $60 Cdn. They don't shift sideways when you try to unhook like the pinned versions do. Just Chinese junk, but I have yet to have problems with one. I did the same thing Sam did with a rented spreader and replaced the bottom piece with new square tubing drilled full of holes and welded to the original base. It was also a weld on drop leg so no issues with where it attached to the frame.
    Even better than the one I listed.
    ---Meltedmetal

  9. #8
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Sam. A few old railway ties Sawn into 18" lengths make perfect stands for placing under any jacked up equipment
    I always have a few handy and wouldn't go under anything without placing them first.
    Just a suggestion I find very handy and safe.

  10. #9
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by Josey View Post
    Sam. A few old railway ties Sawn into 18" lengths make perfect stands for placing under any jacked up equipment
    I always have a few handy and wouldn't go under anything without placing them first.
    Just a suggestion I find very handy and safe.
    yes and railroad ties and treated lumber cutoffs don't bend!!!!
    lincoln 125sp
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    miller 211 w/spool gun
    ahp 200 sx tig
    lotos ltp5000d
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    of course duramax diesel

  11. #10
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Dagnabbit Samm.... you cursed my jack! At least I got it stopped before the square tubing got tore up. Hit the corner of the tire on a sharp turn and tore off the spring loaded retaining pin. I think I'll drill some more holes and use a through pin... nothing to catch the tire next time. I know the baling twine is passe but it's all I had handy at the time....
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    Sometimes you just have to make do with what you have....

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    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  12. #11
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    Jack Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Dagnabbit Samm.... you cursed my jack! At least I got it stopped before the square tubing got tore up. Hit the corner of the tire on a sharp turn and tore off the spring loaded retaining pin. I think I'll drill some more holes and use a through pin... nothing to catch the tire next time. I know the baling twine is passe but it's all I had handy at the time....
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Size:  497.6 KB

    Sometimes you just have to make do with what you have....

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    My dad wired everything up. But I gotta admit he was a PRO. His wired up jobs looked “factory “. LOL.

    Must have been because he was in the army. Military precision


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  14. #12
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    Re: Jack Repair

    No cows and the miles of telephone wire I rolled up in the 70's is pretty much gone. I have to resort to the newer plastic materials...
    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A
    Cut 50 Plasma
    Les

  15. #13
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    Re: Jack Repair

    Great work.

    Heat bending and straightening is always fascinating. It's truly an art of understanding the nature of metal, and sammm you are quite the artist in this regard.

    I love the zip tie cotter pin, I've heard stories of everything from green wood/bark, tape, nails and screws, wires of every type, and even super glue (most used to make more of a lump than a pin) saving the day and getting stuff limped home.

    We always have at least a few rolls of thick and thin bailing or rebar wire around at all times, and it gets used consistently!

  16. #14
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    Re: Jack Repair

    All our new 50 and 100 pound jute/burlap sacks came in big bundles secured by a really good grade of steel wire.

    We always had a pile of 10 foot lengths around. Nice for gas welding with too.


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  18. #15
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    Re: Jack Repair

    A coffee can in your truck or tractor with large nails and small garden spikes work too for emergencies. Just don't spill them in the field!!

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