Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 35 of 35

Thread: Welding galvanized steel

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    98
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffrey.penfield View Post
    I have not considered adhesive on this welders forum before, but you make good points. I understand that the adhesive could be much stronger at resisting separation of the tubing ifI tried pulling them apart. But what about left to right movement? For my case it would be plenty strong, but for general knowledge, wouldn’t a butt weld be stronger at resisting lateral movements than adhesive on an insert?
    I might consider adhesive some other time, but I am going with welding on this one. I am a hobby welder and any weld is good practice and good fun. Gluing pipe, not so much.
    I am retracting my earlier concerns about stick welding it. I have some 3/32 e6011 and an excellent stick welder (Linde 305). I wont have to separate the tubing and grind anything. I can just weld away. I will wear an 95 mask, hold my breath, weld outside with a fan and see how it goes. I will tack weld the corners to make sure I do not burn through before welding the ends. The insert will be a nice backing plate and the screws I placed earlier will hold it in place. This will be done in 1-2 days and I will update you if all goes well.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I wouldn't bother with an P95 (or R95, or N95) for welding. Get a low profile cartridge respirator with the right cartridges for the zinc fumes. I forgot the 3M "pancake" filter number, but I use a 3M half mask with P100 filters under my hood if I'm welding nasty stuff. An SAR would be the way to go but I haven't bothered buying the adapters. A P95 disposable probably isn't gonna do much.

    TL;DR Skip the P95 disposable mask, get plenty of ventilation, hold your breath when welding. Don't breath zinc fumes. Big fan blowing air to you is very helpful.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  2. #27
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,699
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    i wouldnt bother w/ any of it. id b more concerned about whats in our food/water and whatever else there trying to stick us w/

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Clovis California
    Posts
    3,502
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    Hot dip goes by oz a thick coating is 3oz and used for in barley in earth typically on hot roll steel and coil steel.
    The coating used on metal building I think is 0.25 or less coating typically on hot or coil cold rolled steel.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    I built a large gantry crane out of hot dipped A36. Very thick galvanized coating. Gummed up a grinding wheel like aluminum. Anyway, for welding galvi., get the zinc off with a hard stone or a flap wheel, then weld as usual. Run a fan for ventilation and stay up wind of the fumes. The biggest (non-health related) concern I have with welding galvanized is that it makes the welds freeze slower - "runny". Plus it makes an absolute mess on your welding hood. I keep a rag with me to clean the lens every few welds. If you can help it, hold your breath during the weld, flip your hood up, step back, THEN take a breath.

    I should say that most of the galvanized I weld is extremely thick. Not like galvanized pipe. Thick like powder coating.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  4. Likes 52 Ford liked this post
  5. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    central Wis.
    Posts
    5,979
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    Quote Originally Posted by smithdoor View Post
    Hot dip goes by oz a thick coating is 3oz and used for in barley in earth typically on hot roll steel and coil steel.
    The coating used on metal building I think is 0.25 or less coating typically on hot or coil cold rolled steel.

    Dave
    I would think the coating would be much less than a quarter inch thick🤣.

  6. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Clovis California
    Posts
    3,502
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    It is in ounce not inches.
    In inches in most roll steel hot dip is it about 0.000,5" to 0.005".
    I do not remember 3 ounce thickness

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by M J D View Post
    I would think the coating would be much less than a quarter inch thick🤣.

  7. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    4,424
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    When i have products galvy, price is by weight. I think 4 to 5 percent added mass.

  8. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    98
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    https://www.scafco.com/wp-content/up...signations.pdf

    I haven't read through this, yet. I just skimmed through the first page or two, but it looks like a pretty good explanation of zinc coating weight/thickness and classification.

    If I understood them right and did my math right, a G115 (1.15 ounce/square foot) would be about 78 thou total thickness for both sides of a sheet - but it doesnt have to be equal on both sides - but if it was thatd be 39 thou single side thickness.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    Last edited by 52 Ford; 10-02-2021 at 09:06 PM.

  9. #33
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    484
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel






    e I
    These are my results and my thoughts. On the first rail I tacked with 6011 and tacks look nice as shown. When I went to weld a side I burnt through. It may have been thinner than 11 gauge. I then tried grinding and using MIG(not flux core). Welds were really bad with porosity everywhere and brown/black soot all over the place like I did not have the gas on. The zinc may have been thicker than I realized and that might have been contaminating my MIG welds. I ground a lot and then painted and those are the pics. The welds were so bad I could not take a pic of them much less post them. In the end there was way more stability to the tubing. It no long swayed and flopped with just the inserts and screws. I brought it back to the way it was originally designed. It was designed to be continuous tubing. The insert was a fix because I did not want to transport a 30 foot piece of tubing on a 16 foot trailer and that was a poor and unstable fix that welding corrected.
    I learned that stick welding should not be done on thin metal(duh!). I learned that MIG welding should be avoided on galvanized metal even if you grind it. I might have only ground off the zinc oxide and just made the underlying zinc shiny instead of getting to bare steel. I should have done flux core. But in the end it is welded and way more stable.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. Likes 52 Ford liked this post
  11. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    98
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffrey.penfield View Post





    e I
    These are my results and my thoughts. On the first rail I tacked with 6011 and tacks look nice as shown. When I went to weld a side I burnt through. It may have been thinner than 11 gauge. I then tried grinding and using MIG(not flux core). Welds were really bad with porosity everywhere and brown/black soot all over the place like I did not have the gas on. The zinc may have been thicker than I realized and that might have been contaminating my MIG welds. I ground a lot and then painted and those are the pics. The welds were so bad I could not take a pic of them much less post them. In the end there was way more stability to the tubing. It no long swayed and flopped with just the inserts and screws. I brought it back to the way it was originally designed. It was designed to be continuous tubing. The insert was a fix because I did not want to transport a 30 foot piece of tubing on a 16 foot trailer and that was a poor and unstable fix that welding corrected.
    I learned that stick welding should not be done on thin metal(duh!). I learned that MIG welding should be avoided on galvanized metal even if you grind it. I might have only ground off the zinc oxide and just made the underlying zinc shiny instead of getting to bare steel. I should have done flux core. But in the end it is welded and way more stable.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    For galvanized, grind till you see sparks. No sparks - still not down to steel. I also like to grind it back away from the weld by maybe 1/2" or so. For stick welding thin stuff, turn it down as much as you can while still being able to hold an arc, keep a shallow rod angle, and move fast. I've stick welded plenty of exhaust pipe and other thin-ish stuff like that. Practice. Practice. Practice.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  12. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    NW New Jersey
    Posts
    944
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Welding galvanized steel

    3/32" 75 amps DC+ E7014


    Name:  iPhone5 027.jpg
Views: 46
Size:  145.2 KB

    Name:  iPhone5 028.jpg
Views: 44
Size:  130.3 KB


    Usually the wall or floor anchors break before the weld does.

    I might suggest Hobart 3/32" 6011, and 6013 from Tractor supply. they will run on really low amps, and have less slag than the Lincoln rod (especially the 6013).

    E6013 :
    https://www.hobartbrothers.com/wp-co...Hobart447A.pdf


    E6011 :
    https://www.hobartbrothers.com/wp-co...Hobart335A.pdf


    When welding tube up like that , its easier to use an 1/8"x 1" x 4" pieces of flat bar(fish plates, tie plates ?) and weld to the sides. Just a matter of practicing. I personally don't attempt to remove the galvanizing because it just makes the metal thinner, and more difficult to weld without burning through. The flux in the electrode will usually burn off the contamination, unless its really thick hot dip galvy, the stuff with icicle looking pieces of zinc on it. Then you'll need to grind. The stuff your welding is not that, might even be one of the new mixtures they've come up with: Galva-lume , Aluma-Galv or some other mixture.

    Glad you got it done, just thought this might help if you run into something similar. BTW what machines did you use to do this ? I remember you had a big 300 amp Linde, but you mention mig. Just curious.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by albrightree; 10-11-2021 at 10:11 AM.
    Airco 250 ac/dc Heliwelder Square wave
    Miller Synchrowave 180 sd
    Miller Econo Twin HF
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Dayton 225 ac/dc
    Victor torches
    Snap-On YA-212
    Lotos Cut60D

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,638,327,052.76960 seconds with 15 queries