Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 43 of 43

Thread: Interesting video on cut off wheels

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    432
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by psacustomcreations View Post
    That was in reference to a recent newer member who had a bit of an attitude.


    Sent from my SM-G996U using Tapatalk
    Getting off topic, but I have to ask, who was Brandon?

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Laredo, Tx
    Posts
    6,065
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Try 3M Cubitron II cut off wheels in 0.045" thickness. They will give you a new perspective on how well a cutting wheel will work/last.
    1st on WeldingWeb to have a scrolling sig!



  3. Likes N2 Welding liked this post
  4. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    1,709
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Interesting to see the attitude on here towards breathing grinding dust.

    Over here we would never be bothered about a little bit of grinding dust unless you're doing a lot of it, or if you're cleaning rust off. Pulling black bogies out of your nose for the next day or two gets old.
    We would wear a dust mask or a PAPR hood for any significant dust, but I wouldn't think twice about just slipping safety glasses on to do a couple of quick cuts or flatting down a weld or two.

    We do, as a rule, all keep the guards on our angle grinders though.

    The HSE have tightened down on a lot of businesses generating welding fume - generally stick and mig welding needs to have good fume extraction, and/or PAPR hoods. PAPR hoods are very common place now, in fact they're simply expected. The 3M Speedglas 9100FX is pretty much the industry standard. Great for wearing all day for both grinding and welding.
    Murphy's Golden Rule: Whoever has the gold, makes the rules.

  5. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Hellinois
    Posts
    5,853
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    I have always used the score method. I never thought it would last that much longer. I do it that way because, without scientific evidence like this video, I was taught long ago when using a skil saw on lumber that the blade should be just past the depth of the lumber. This way, when cutting, there are more teeth cutting at one time, which is more efficient and less wear. Thanks for posting
    "Where's Stick man????????" - 7A749
    "SHHHHHH!! I sent him over to snag that MIC-4 while tbone wasn't looking!" - duaneb55
    "I have bought a few of Tbone's things unlike Stick-Man who helps himself" - TozziWelding
    "Stick-man"

  6. Likes Weldalittle liked this post
  7. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    central Wis.
    Posts
    6,110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Stick-man View Post
    I have always used the score method. I never thought it would last that much longer. I do it that way because, without scientific evidence like this video, I was taught long ago when using a skil saw on lumber that the blade should be just past the depth of the lumber. This way, when cutting, there are more teeth cutting at one time, which is more efficient and less wear. Thanks for posting
    Exactly, and the same applies when using the metal cutting circular saws. Seems so many people bury the blade and then complain about poor blade life.

  8. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    4,546
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    I have heard a chop saw is supposed to be used in a chopping manner, not a steady push? I wonder there is a connection to blade life.

    I am usually more interested in speed. Though I score to steer the wheel.

    Nice video, thanks for sharing. Helpful to know, when you on your last 2 wheels and in a remote location, how to use them wisely.

  9. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Laredo, Tx
    Posts
    6,065
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by tapwelder View Post
    I have heard a chop saw is supposed to be used in a chopping manner, not a steady push?
    I've yet to see any reference to someone actually using it like that. I think someone took the "chop" part and just finished watching Karate Kid, and tried to put 2 and 2 together. IMO, the "chop" part of the name is simply because you're chopping steel apart.
    1st on WeldingWeb to have a scrolling sig!



  10. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    4,546
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar View Post
    I've yet to see any reference to someone actually using it like that. I think someone took the "chop" part and just finished watching Karate Kid, and tried to put 2 and 2 together. IMO, the "chop" part of the name is simply because you're chopping steel apart.
    Perhaps so. It has been many years since i have used a chop saw. However, i did chop in attempts to keep blade flex down. Then, i gave up and sold it.

  11. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    6,032
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    The Makita rep explained to me that abrasive chop saw blades indeed
    benefitted from a gentle chopping action.

    This minimized blade deflection, glazing and resulted in longer blade life due to less heat build up.

    Once again.. we are talking about ABRASIVE chop saws.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    :

  12. Likes farmersammm, 12V71, VaughnT liked this post
  13. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    6,500
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    The Makita rep explained to me that abrasive chop saw blades indeed
    benefitted from a gentle chopping action.

    This minimized blade deflection, glazing and resulted in longer blade life due to less heat build up.

    Once again.. we are talking about ABRASIVE chop saws.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Absolutely. I never go through a piece of metal with a steady push on the saw. I cut, release a bit of pressure, then resume cutting with adequate pressure.

    Using a chop saw with a heavy hand causes deflection, as well as wearing the wheel prematurely. Not very good for the motor and gear train either.

    I don't expect real accuracy from a chop saw. It's just a fast, cheap, way to cut metal for run of the mill fabrication.

    As far as folks in the UK not being bothered by a bit of grinder dust...........................it should be considered that the "dust" is a combination of very nasty abrasives, and tiny shards of the metal the abrasive is wearing through as it cuts. Not something I'd like to breathe in any kind of time frame........seconds, minutes, or hours.

  14. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    368
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    It's ok for flat bar stock or plate but clearly he's not done pressure pipe butt joints where time and precision are paramount.

  15. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    1,709
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by farmersammm View Post
    As far as folks in the UK not being bothered by a bit of grinder dust...........................it should be considered that the "dust" is a combination of very nasty abrasives, and tiny shards of the metal the abrasive is wearing through as it cuts. Not something I'd like to breathe in any kind of time frame........seconds, minutes, or hours.
    Just bear in mind that grinding dust isn't half as bad as welding fume... say the stuff that comes off stainless steel stick or MIG
    Murphy's Golden Rule: Whoever has the gold, makes the rules.

  16. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    3,173
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Woznme View Post
    It's ok for flat bar stock or plate but clearly he's not done pressure pipe butt joints where time and precision are paramount.
    What technique and tools do you use in those applications?


    Sent from my SM-G996U using Tapatalk
    Millermatic 252 MIG
    Miller Dynasty 200DX TIG
    Miller Spectrum 625 Plasma
    Altas 12x36 Metal Lathe
    Bridgeport Milling Machine
    www.psacustomcreations.com

  17. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    368
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Mark out pipe carefully with a wrap. I use a pferd 5" zip disc. Grinder held horizontal in right hand, left hand on pipe with thumb on guard to help guide it. Start on near side of pipe with short back and forth motion until the wheel penetrates the pipe. Then follow the waste side of the line while rotating the pipe towards you keeping the wheel fully penetrated and plumb.
    Nice fast square cut, no wavey knife edges.
    Consumables go on the bill.
    Gloves on both hands of course. Guard in back position.

  18. Likes psacustomcreations liked this post
  19. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    368
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    And that's for pipe on stands. If it's in position, same technique but you go around the pipe.

  20. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Laredo, Tx
    Posts
    6,065
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by farmersammm View Post
    Using a chop saw with a heavy hand causes deflection, as well as wearing the wheel prematurely. Not very good for the motor and gear train either.
    I think if you use a heavy hand on the initial contact point, when the wheel is largely un-supported (on either side) on the radial distance to the center mount, then that will definitely cause large deflection issues; but once you're into the cut, the sides of the abrasive wheel are more and more supported the deeper the wheel is into the part, and the more pressure can be used until you once again reach the bottom 20% of the cut when you have to let up on some pressure because the un-supported piece is now starting to fall off and is not bracing the disc on it's side. If the "cut off" side is also clamped, then there's less to worry about as well, IMO. I figured all this was common knowledge from having actually used abrasive chop saws.
    1st on WeldingWeb to have a scrolling sig!



  21. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Laredo, Tx
    Posts
    6,065
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    You'll wonder why you ever used anything else (except as emergency back-up's)



    1st on WeldingWeb to have a scrolling sig!



  22. Likes psacustomcreations, VaughnT liked this post
  23. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    144
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Interesting video on cut off wheels

    There has been a lot of good discussion in this thread about using cutoff disks. Maybe the best point that Jason's video makes is that good techniques play an important part in using about any tool.
    His first demonstration of the plunge method ( I think that is the term he uses), though, doesn't do as much to discount the method, as it does to show how improper technique can destroy a wheel. That thin steel, hanging unsupported out in thin air, and left to vibrate like it did, was more the problem then the technique. At least in my opinion. And in my experience. He could hardly have placed the wheel at a greater disadvantage. I believe one would achieve far better results with the steel stud securely held and with the cut line right on the edge of the table, sawhorse, etc., that is supporting it. The steel needs to be as rigid as possible. Then you let the wheel do the cutting.
    Proper work habits will give better results than the "plunge" versus "score" debate.
    However, if carefully scoring the thin steel stud a number of times gives one the results you like, then score to your hearts content!!


    Sent from my E6810 using http://tiny.cc/Forums_reader

  24. Likes psacustomcreations, VaughnT, Lis2323 liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Page generated in 1,642,733,274.90252 seconds with 12 queries