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Thread: Shop Made Tools

  1. #51
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Shop build stand for Baldor polisher







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  3. #52
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    Blacksmith work station with 300 pound concrete filled base




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    Like the Miller roll around cart, where did you get that?
    Richard
    West coast of Florida

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  5. #53
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by LtBadd View Post
    Like the Miller roll around cart, where did you get that?
    It's just a Princess Auto/ HF one.

    extended the undercarriage, and added a drawer ....




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  7. #54
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Mobile weld clamp rack....

    Slide out rack under welding table




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  8. #55
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    It's just a Princess Auto/ HF one.

    extended the undercarriage, and added a drawer ....




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    Did you paint it? The color matches up pretty well with the fume extractor.

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  9. #56
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Did you paint it? The color matches up pretty well with the fume extractor.

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    rattle can


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  11. #57
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post



    rattle can


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    Oooooo fancy Miller brand paint!

    I was going to buy a case of Rolair green to repaint one of my compressors... well, it's $40 a can. I now have a red Rolair.

    Edit: I know I could've just gone with something close, but when I saw the price, I just said screw it and grabbed a can off paint I already had. Matches the engine cover on the Honda, anyway.

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    Last edited by 52 Ford; 06-15-2022 at 07:52 PM.

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  13. #58
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    I made this platform for work, it slides onto the forks of the front end loader then off you go.

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  15. #59
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by C4Mac View Post
    I made this platform for work, it slides onto the forks of the front end loader then off you go.

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    Nice!

    Serious question: What's OSHA think about this kinda platform?

    Edit: personally, I'd have no issue with getting in it (as long as the loader is in good shape and the operator is competent).

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  17. #60
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Nice. Could do with some compliant lanyard fixing points (eg. rated eye bolts or large carabiners that can go around the whole angle ). A gate would also be a nice addition. Do you have any bars under the channels to keep it from bouncing off the forks?

  18. #61
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    here's my non compliant man basket



    Doing my version of " How Many Farmers Does It Take...To Change A Lightbulb??!"


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  20. #62
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Nice!

    Serious question: What's OSHA think about this kinda platform?

    Edit: personally, I'd have no issue with getting in it (as long as the loader is in good shape and the operator is competent).

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk
    Supervisor didn't want to get it inspected so we used it for a couple jobs in the yard for about a month and it's been parked ever since. I was the heavy equipment operator in our yard most of the last couple years so I would have been the operator.

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  22. #63
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Woznme View Post
    Nice. Could do with some compliant lanyard fixing points (eg. rated eye bolts or large carabiners that can go around the whole angle ). A gate would also be a nice addition. Do you have any bars under the channels to keep it from bouncing off the forks?
    In order:
    If you look on the opposite side of the platform you will see at the bottom and at the top rail I welded on 1/2" steel bar loops, the lower one is for chaining to the forks on the loader the upper one is for clipping on fall arrestor lanyards.
    I asked if I could build a gate into it, would have been no problem putting in an inward swinging gate but the boss wasn't on board. That's why I put the grip tape on the left hand side, so you can climb in a little easier. Should have been a gate.
    You can't really see it from these pictures but the channels on the bottom are actually rectangular tube that had some sections from the bottom removed so as long as the chain is hooked up it can't slide far enough off the forks to come out of the skid tubes.

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  24. #64
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    here's my non compliant man basket



    Doing my version of " How Many Farmers Does It Take...To Change A Lightbulb??!"


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    Im gonna say 2 - 3. Though, only one if it's someone lile Weldman, he'll just monkey is way up the boom and hop into the basket.

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  25. #65
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Im gonna say 2 - 3. Though, only one if it's someone lile Weldman, he'll just monkey is way up the boom and hop into the basket.

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    nope


    weldman would climb straight up the pole.....


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  27. #66
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    For a right handed smith, you want the horn on the left side. Might wanna flip it around so you don't get made fun of.
    That's backwards. I've had 100+ vintage anvils and sold off all but a couple because I'm partial to double-horn anvils. A good smith should be able to work on both sides of the anvil, but for traditional work, the horn is on the hammer side.

    My Refflinghaus South German No. 57 that weighs 330lb and No. 58 that weighs 325lb with side shelf:

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    Check out my bench vise website:
    http://mivise.com


    Miller Syncrowave 250DX
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    Miller Regency 200 with 22A feeder and Spoolmatic 3
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  29. #67
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Looks nice.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by G-ManBart View Post
    That's backwards. I've had 100+ vintage anvils and sold off all but a couple because I'm partial to double-horn anvils. A good smith should be able to work on both sides of the anvil, but for traditional work, the horn is on the hammer side.

    My Refflinghaus South German No. 57 that weighs 330lb and No. 58 that weighs 325lb with side shelf:

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  30. #68
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Posting issues...
    Last edited by G-ManBart; 06-16-2022 at 04:37 PM.
    Check out my bench vise website:
    http://mivise.com


    Miller Syncrowave 250DX
    Millermatic 350P with XR AlumaPro
    Miller Regency 200 with 22A feeder and Spoolmatic 3
    Hobart Champion Elite
    Everlast PowerTig 210EXT

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  32. #69
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by G-ManBart View Post
    Posting issues...
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    The harder you fall, the higher you bounce...

    250 amp Miller DialArc AC/DC Stick
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  34. #70
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by G-ManBart View Post
    That's backwards. I've had 100+ vintage anvils and sold off all but a couple because I'm partial to double-horn anvils. A good smith should be able to work on both sides of the anvil, but for traditional work, the horn is on the hammer side.

    My Refflinghaus South German No. 57 that weighs 330lb and No. 58 that weighs 325lb with side shelf:

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    Maybe it's a regional thing. I almost always see the horn on the left.

    If you look at pictures of old blacksmith shops with single horn anvils, the horn is usually on the left side. Given, I'm looking at shops in America.

    I've never used a Bavarian pattern anvil with a shelf. What's it's intended use? I understand what the upsetting block is for.... upsetting.


    Edit: All of the farriers I've seen have the horn on the left, too. Again, it might be a regional thing.

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    Last edited by 52 Ford; 06-16-2022 at 07:18 PM.

  35. #71
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Maybe it's a regional thing. I almost always see the horn on the left.

    If you look at pictures of old blacksmith shops with single horn anvils, the horn is usually on the left side. Given, I'm looking at shops in America.

    I've never used a Bavarian pattern anvil with a shelf. What's it's intended use? I understand what the upsetting block is for.... upsetting.


    Edit: All of the farriers I've seen have the horn on the left, too. Again, it might be a regional thing.
    I'm not sure it's regional as much as task related. Farriers seem to like having their tong hand closer to the horn, and you can't use a clip point on the cutting table with it facing you, so they point the horn to the left (for a righty). The added benefit is they can go from face to horn without taking a step, or at least a smaller step. For people doing a lot of ornamental forging they're more likely to be the other way around. They are often working with hardy tools, and having those under the hammer hand can be dangerous if you're switching back and forth from face to hardy without removing the tool every time. For heavy forging I think having the horn to the right (for a righty) makes more sense...you want to be forging over the biggest area of mass and that's closer to the horn on a London pattern anvil. That also lets you rest heavy work on more of the face rather than have it hanging over the horn...at least from a balance standpoint. The two full-time shops and one part time shop I've been to around here are largely horn to the hammer side, but they're all doing quite a bit of ornamental stuff with a good helping of heavy forging thrown in. I do some stuff on the right side and other stuff on the left...just whatever seems to be the most convenient.

    This is one of the interesting things about the double-bick anvils....most have the hardy near the rounded horn. That lets you go from face to hardy with the horn to the left (for a righty)...you can leave the hot cut in and not risk hammering your hand into it (yes, it's still better to remove it). I cheat...have multiple anvils set up for different things so I can have two or three all right around the forge and switch quickly.

    The side shelf is just handy for those times when you don't want or need the full width of the face. Acute angles are easier both across the width of the shelf and around the end. Some people will even sharpen the end of the shelf to a finer point for work they do frequently. Some folks like how it makes the face effectively wider for doing long scrolls, and some folks even claim it's better for forge welding small parts as it doesn't soak up as much heat from the work so you get a bit more work time. I just think it's a handy shape to be built into the anvil. In some ways it's kind of like a hardy tool like a forming block...just a bit smaller shape to work with.
    Check out my bench vise website:
    http://mivise.com


    Miller Syncrowave 250DX
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    Miller Regency 200 with 22A feeder and Spoolmatic 3
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  37. #72
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by G-ManBart View Post
    I'm not sure it's regional as much as task related. Farriers seem to like having their tong hand closer to the horn, and you can't use a clip point on the cutting table with it facing you, so they point the horn to the left (for a righty). The added benefit is they can go from face to horn without taking a step, or at least a smaller step. For people doing a lot of ornamental forging they're more likely to be the other way around. They are often working with hardy tools, and having those under the hammer hand can be dangerous if you're switching back and forth from face to hardy without removing the tool every time. For heavy forging I think having the horn to the right (for a righty) makes more sense...you want to be forging over the biggest area of mass and that's closer to the horn on a London pattern anvil. That also lets you rest heavy work on more of the face rather than have it hanging over the horn...at least from a balance standpoint. The two full-time shops and one part time shop I've been to around here are largely horn to the hammer side, but they're all doing quite a bit of ornamental stuff with a good helping of heavy forging thrown in. I do some stuff on the right side and other stuff on the left...just whatever seems to be the most convenient.

    This is one of the interesting things about the double-bick anvils....most have the hardy near the rounded horn. That lets you go from face to hardy with the horn to the left (for a righty)...you can leave the hot cut in and not risk hammering your hand into it (yes, it's still better to remove it). I cheat...have multiple anvils set up for different things so I can have two or three all right around the forge and switch quickly.

    The side shelf is just handy for those times when you don't want or need the full width of the face. Acute angles are easier both across the width of the shelf and around the end. Some people will even sharpen the end of the shelf to a finer point for work they do frequently. Some folks like how it makes the face effectively wider for doing long scrolls, and some folks even claim it's better for forge welding small parts as it doesn't soak up as much heat from the work so you get a bit more work time. I just think it's a handy shape to be built into the anvil. In some ways it's kind of like a hardy tool like a forming block...just a bit smaller shape to work with.
    The way my forging area is set up, My forge is to the right of my anvil and my anvil has the horn on the left side. When I'm hot cutting stock, I usually have the hotcut oriented "sideways". That way the offcuts fall off next to the anvil, instead of behind it. I don't usually forge with a striker/helper and I don't like to leave hot steel on the ground. (I don't usually cut all the way through. Normally, I leave a small amount of material holding the stock together and remove the offcut with tongs)

    I also don't do much heavy forging. Most of my stock is under 1-1/2" square and round bar. The thing that I like about having the horn on the left is that when I'm using it, I tend to direct my hammer blows angled at maybe a 20 or 30 degree angle towards the body of the anvil versus straight into horn if I was forging with the horn on the right. It's hard to explain in writing.
    Last edited by 52 Ford; 06-16-2022 at 10:58 PM.

  38. #73
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Nice!

    Serious question: What's OSHA think about this kinda platform?

    Edit: personally, I'd have no issue with getting in it (as long as the loader is in good shape and the operator is competent).

    Sent from my Lincoln Buzzbox using Tapatalk
    That is great,,, I been 400 ft in a 55 gallon barrel we blow a couple holes in and shackle to the rig,,, I dont think there was a tie off lanyard within 50 miles of the place.

  39. #74
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    I was working on the car yesterday and needed a 5.5mm thin-walled deep socket or driver. Didn't feel like trying to walk or ride a bike to get one and no place nearby sold one separately, so I made one from a steel rod, turned down a bit, drilled to 5mm and cut the flutes with a small triangular file.

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  40. #75
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    Re: Shop Made Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Woznme View Post
    Nice. Could do with some compliant lanyard fixing points (eg. rated eye bolts or large carabiners that can go around the whole angle ). A gate would also be a nice addition. Do you have any bars under the channels to keep it from bouncing off the forks?
    I remember years ago, when I made this thing, that I looked up all the OSHA stuff, and was fairly compliant with the regs. I didn't have lanyard thingies, but figure you can loop your safety line around any one of the rails.



    I have the inward opening gate, and very good protection against the thing falling off the fork. Even have toe boards. Far as the operator goes..................K'kins is the one I trust my life to. She did shove me up into some tree branches though, but she didn't mean to(I thinkName:  unsure.gif
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