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Thread: Tig welding

  1. #76
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    Re: Tig welding

    I agree

    I did have TIG like you it had place.
    The wire and stick is a lot fast but down side to stick is take a lot more learning experience. TIG is a lot easier to learn to do a good weld.

    The downside to TIG it is no wind. When first learning TIG you put candle by for and if it flicker do not weld.
    The other is overhead welding I can torch, stick, mig and fluxcore weld overhead but not TIG.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Sberry View Post
    All that would be a last resort if there was another legit way to do it. I can count on one hand in 40 years had to tig something in a general shop and a couple of those could have been done spooly if we had it. I tigged on power plants and in a couple custom job shops, the job shops could have been spooly too for the most part, they simply had tig. I understand the specialist but most of the world isnt,,,, and this is partly why we get the newbie has "researched" and come to the conclusion he needs every process and one can do 1/2 aluym so he can fool around when he in all likelihood got absolutely no use for it and is a poster child for a 210 wire feed.

  2. #77
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    Re: Tig welding

    I'll disagree. I started welding at age 13, 53 years ago. My first process was acetylene, & I'm damned proficient.
    Next was AC stick. For me, a limited success. I built a bunch of devices without a weld fail, but I longed for more.
    In 1979 myself & a friend rented a MIG machine. He spread a load of BS about what big shots we were! I was humiliated at the lies he told, but the chance to transplant a BMW nose with a state of the arc Miller MIG was delightful! In 1979 I recall the MIG machine itself costing $3500. You could buy a new Thunderbird for that. With needed accessories, it was more expensive than a new T Bird. It wasn't until 2010 I finally bought a Miller MIG. By then, it cost $2400 for a better machine than the 1979 offering.

    I still wanted aluminum TIG, bought my first 2013, it was disappointing. On my third TIG now, a sweet machine!
    Last edited by Willie B; 07-12-2022 at 07:23 PM.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  3. #78
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    Re: Tig welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie B View Post
    I'll disagree. I started welding at age 13, 53 years ago. My first process was acetylene, & I'm damned proficient.
    Next was AC stick. For me, a limited success. I built a bunch of devices without a weld fail, but I longed for more.
    In 1979 myself & a friend rented a MIG machine. He spread a load of BS about what big shots we were! I was humiliated at the lies he told, but the chance to transplant a BMW nose with a state of the arc Miller MIG was delightful! In 1979 I recall the MIG machine itself costing $3500. You could buy a new Thunderbird for that. With needed accessories, it was more expensive than a new T Bird. It wasn't until 2010 I finally bought a Miller MIG. By then, it cost $2400 for a better machine than the 1979 offering.

    I still wanted aluminum TIG, bought my first 2013, it was disappointing. On my third TIG now, a sweet machine!
    What exactly / and who are you disagreeing with?
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  4. #79
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    Re: Tig welding

    Quote Originally Posted by John T View Post
    What exactly / and who are you disagreeing with?
    Some guy doesn't speak pretty much too good English some. He prefers flux core in very hot weather, wearing leather.
    An optimist is usually wrong, and when the unexpected happens is unprepared. A pessimist is usually right, when wrong, is delighted, and well prepared.

  5. #80
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    Re: Tig welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie B View Post
    Some guy doesn't speak pretty much too good English some. He prefers flux core in very hot weather, wearing leather.
    gotcha
    Miller 211
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  6. #81
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    Re: Tig welding

    I would probably use tig more if fixturing were easier/ more convenient. Also, cleanliness can be a factor if tigging. I know with railing, the process can be faster if parts are fixed. When finished tigging, you’re finish… minimal to no post cleaning. And it looks remarkably different. Kinda like metal worked Hot vs metal worked cold. I have built nearly 1000 rails and tig welded only about 3 fully. Whole lot more convenient to grab a mig gun.

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